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Because moving our inventory online is a work in progress, you may not find everything you want or need today. You may see a message that says, No products are currently available in this category. But don't worry! You can still use our current list and order as usual while our shelves are being filled. To order from the catalog, Download the 2010 NESC Products Catalog pdf file (932 KB in size). Eventually all of our products will be available to you through the Free Shopping Cart. We welcome your comments about this service.



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Ozone Treatment of Drinking Water Supplies
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Ozone is a strong oxidizing agent, and like chlorine, it is used to kill disease-causing bacteria and viruses. Ozone units are installed as a point-of-entry treatment system. This illustrated fact sheet provides information about this home treatment option.

DWFSPE296DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Paying for Onsite System Management
National Environmental Services Center

The Fall 2001 Pipeline discusses ways small communities can finance the centralized management of onsite wastewater treatment systems to ensure their performance. The newsletter outlines many funding options and resources. It includes a case study of how one small community funds their onsite system management program.

SFPLNL27DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


Performance Benchmarking for Effectively Managed Water Utilities
Performance Benchmarking for Effectively Managed Water Utilities
Water Research Foundation

This booklet discusses the objectives of the project, “Performance Benchmarking for Effectively Managed Water Utilities.” It further explains how to build upon past Effective Utility Management (EUM) work by: identifying practice areas associated with achieving the Ten Attributes associated with EUM; identifying key performance metrics for each practice area; providing the capability for utilities to identify targets associated with each leading practice; developing a benchmarking framework and assessment methodology; developing a supporting benchmarking tool; pilot testing the framework across an appropriate cross-section of utilities; and making the tool available for the use and benefit of the water sector.

DWBLMG224DL/Book: 271 pp. (2014)

Price: $0.00
 
Performance of a Textile Filter, Polishing Sand Filter & Shallow Trench System for the Treatment of Domestic Wastewater at the Northeast Regional Correction Center
University of Minnesota - Duluth, Natural Resources Research Institute

An estimated half million households in Minnesota are not connected to public sewer systmes. Along with the growing use and expansion of lakeshore cabins and resorts, many have the potential to degrade surface and groundwater resources as they depend primarily on inidvidual sewage treatment systems (ISTSs) for the treatment and dispersal of domestic wastewater. The Northeast Regional Correction Center research site provided an excellent location to evalute the treatment and operational performance of a proprietary recirculating textile filter (for enhanced pathogent removal) and shallow infiltration trenches for final treatment and dispersal. This reserach study about third-party testing provides the audiences with an unbiased evaluation of the treatment and operational performance of the system.

WWBLRE48DL/Booklet: 28pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Performance of an Aerobic Treatment Unit and Drip Dispersal System for the Treatment of Domestic Wastewater at the Northeast Regional Correction Center
University of Minnesota - Duluth, Natural Resources Research Institute

This research paper provides an overview of the operation and performance of one brand of aerobic treatment unit and a drip dispersal system tested at the northern Minnesota research facility. An estimated half million homes in Minnesota are not connected to public sewer systems. Along with the growing use of lakeshore cabins and the conversion of cabins into year-round homes, many have the potential to degrade surface and groundwater resources as they depend primarily on individual sewage systems for the treatment and dispersal of domestic wastewater. This research paper provides a methodology that monitored discharge from the ATU every three weeks from October 1997 through January 1999. Between February 1998 and May 1998, an additional effluent sample was collected from the drip dose tank to obtain a composite sample of ATU effluent. The paper also provides performance results and full references for further information.

WWBLRE47DL/Booklet: 12pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Performance of Engineered Treatment Units and Their Effects on Biozone Formation in Soil and System Purification Efficiency
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

Due to the high demand for land, development in areas traditionally considered unsuitable for typical wastewater treatment systems are now employing engineered treatment units. This document reports on an extensive research project carried out by the Colorado School of Mines, Environmental Science and Engineering Division to determine performance of these treatment units. The primary objectives of this research were to delineate the effluent with respect to chemicals and pathogens, determine the effects of higher effluent quality on soil clogging and determine the treatment efficiency. Effluents of differing quality from a septic tank, septic tank with textile filter and septic tank with membrane bioreactor were compared.

WWBKRE52DL/Book: 241pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Performance of Pre-engineered Modular Peat Filters for the Treatment of Domestic Wastewater at the Northeast Regional Correction Center University of Minnesota - Duluth, Natural Resources Research Institute

University of Minnesota - Duluth, Natural Resources Research Institute

Approximately 500,000 Minnesota residences rely on the use of oniste wastewater treatment systems and more than 50 percent of these systems may be in noncompliance with state rules or are failing to the surface. A research site at Northeast Regional Correction Center near Duluth was established in 1995, involving approximately 50 private and public sector partners, to design, construct, and monitor the performance of advanced onsite treatment systmes. The NERCC research site provided an excellent location to evalute the first Puraflo peat filter system in Minnesota. Third-party monitoring provides the onsite wastewater treatment industry, local and state regulators, contractors and interested homeowners with an unbiased evaluation of year-round treatment and operational performance of this peat filter system, especially in a cold climate. This evaluation also provides data regarding the sitability of Minnesota peat as a possible substitute for the standard peat imported from Ireland.

WWBLRE49DL/Booklet: 24pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Pesticides in Drinking Water Wells
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances

This booklet describe various issues well water users should be aware of concerning pesticide contamination. It discusses testing methods and other actions homeowners should take if they fear their water is or possibly could become contaminated.

DWBLPE86DL/Booklet: 16 pp. (1990)

Price: $0.00


 
Pesticides in Drinking Water Wells
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Servics, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, Consumer and Environmental Health Services

Pesticides include a large group of chemicals that are used in agricultural and residential settings to control plant and animal infestations. This booklet explains how pesticides get into drinking water supplies and provides information about related health risks. It includes a chart of allowable limits of common pesticides and provides information about how consumers can get their water supply, including private wells, tested for pesticides.

DWBLPE210DL/Booklet: 20 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
pH of Well Water
pH of Well Water
Water Quality Program, University of Rhode Island

This tip sheet provides information about pH for home owners who rely on well water. Topics covered include what pH is, why low pH can be a problem, how to tell if water is acidic and what to do about it.

DWFSPE452DL /Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2014)

Price: $0.00


 
pH-Acidity of Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

The pH of drinking water is not a health concern, however, acidic water (low pH) can leach metals from plumbing systems, which can cause health problems. This fact sheet gives the general public the facts about the acidity of their well water.

DWFSPE305DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products: An Overview
National Environmental Services Center

Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) include such things as antibiotics and hormones that are turning up in our waterways. Research is only beginning to understand the possible health effects of these chemicals. This article includes a detailed diagram showing the origins and fate of PPCPs in the environmment and gives tips on how homeowners can prevent them from entering the system.

SFPLNL47DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

Natural gas plays a key role in our nation’s clean energy future. Recent advances in drilling technologies—including horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing—have made vast reserves of natural gas economically recoverable in the U.S. Responsible development of America’s oil and gas resources offers important economic, energy security, and environmental benefits. The study plan overall purpose is to elucidate the relationship, if any, between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. More specifically, the study has been designed to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources and to identify the driving factors that affect the severity and frequency of any impacts.

DWBKMG207DL/Book: 190 pp. (2011)

Price: $0.00
 
Planning for Septic Systems: Use of Onsite Decentralized Wastewater Systems in Developing Areas—A guide for county decision makers, planners, and local public health officials
National Association of County Planners

An onsite management plan promotes and protects environmental quality, public health, homeowner investment, community investment, and the local tax base. Proper management of onsite systems is essential to a county's planning and zoning decision-making process regarding water quality protection. This fact sheet is an introduction to small community onsite wastewater treatment management plans to be used in developing a comprehensive management approach for the proper design, installation, operation and maintenance of onsite systems.

WWFSMG42DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Planning for Sustainability: A Handbook for Water and Wastewater Utilities
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Sustainable water infrastructure is vital to providing the American public with clean and safe water and helping to ensure the environmental, economic, and social health of the nation’s communities. This U.S. Environmental Protection Agency handbook describes some of the steps utilities can undertake to enhance their existing planning processes to ensure that water infrastructure investments are cost-effective over their life cycle, resource efficient, and support other relevant community goals. Developed after extensive consultation and input from utilities, states, and other stakeholders, the handbook is organized around a series of Core Elements, including:

• Setting utility sustainability goals and objectives that also support relevant community goals;

• Analyzing a range of alternatives, including green infrastructure and other innovative approaches, based ?on full life-cycle costs; and

• Implementing a financial strategy, including adequate rate structures, to ensure the alternatives selected are sufficiently funded, operated, maintained, and replaced over time.

DWBKMG210DL/Book: 74 pp. (2012)

Price: $0.00
 
Planning Is Essential for Successful Onsite System Management
National Environmental Services Center

The Spring 2001 Pipeline outlines many factors that community leaders need to consider when planning onsite system management. The newsletter promotes centralized management as a way for communities to ensure that local onsite systems are adequately monitored and maintained and that public health and the environment are protected. Most of the information is adapted or taken directly from a prepublication draft of the new EPA Design Manual.

SFPLNL25DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


Planning Wastewater Treatment for Small Communities
Planning Wastewater Treatment for Small Communities
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

This video highlights key factors in the wastewater facility planning process. It discusses the need for appropriate technology, the importance of public participation, and operation and maintenance aspects to consider when determining wastewater treatment needs for small communities.

WWDVPE97DL/Video 15 minutes: 0 pp. (1987)

*** For video downloading and viewing instructions, please use this link

Price: $0.00
 
Plomo en el agua potable: lo que usted hacer para reducir el plomo en el agua potable
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Lead in drinking water can cause a variety of adverse health effects. In babies and children, exposure to lead above the action level can result in delays in physical and mental development. In adults, it can cause increases in blood pressure and kidney problems. This booklet offers suggestions of ways to avoid lead contamination in the home.

DWBLPE195DL/Fact Sheet: 9 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Point-of-Use or Pont-of-Entry Treatment Options for Small Drinking Water Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

To help small public water systems, Congress allows them to install point-of-use (POU) and point-of-entry (POE) treatment devices to achieve compliance with some of the maximum contaminant levels established in the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations. POU and POE treatment devices are designed to treat only a portion of the total flow. This EPA guide book outlines the technical, operational, and managerial issues involved in implementing a POU or POE treatment strategy.

DWBKOM93DL/Book: 123 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Point-Of-Use Reverse Osmosis
Montana Water Center

This interactive training tool helps engineers bring small water systems into compliance with arsenic regulations. The product features activities and cost calculators to illustrate POU-RO concepts, glossary flash cards to increase familiarity with terminology, logbook records to document completed work, and unit quizzes test what you've learned.

DWCDTR20DL/Zip File Download 23MB (2004)

Note that this product may not save your work if you have Windows 7 as your operating system. Using Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Mac OS X will allow you to document progress.

Price: $0.00


 
Point-of-Use Water Treatment Units for Lead Reduction
Minnesota Department of Health, Environmental Health Division, Section of Drinking Water Protection

Lead differs from other contaminants in that it rarely occurs naturally in the raw water supply, rather it becomes a problem after the water has left the treatment plant-usually through the corrosion of the water distribution system and household plumbing. This pamphlet reviews the different types of home water treatment units available and their effectiveness in reducing lead contamination.

DWBRPE378DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Polluted Runoff: Lessons Learned from the National Estuarine Research Reserve System
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, Estuarine Reserves Division

It is clear that the things we do on the land have direct and indirect effects on the streams, rivers, lakes and estuaries, and oceans. Management measures can be developed that reduce the adverse effects of our activities. Significant research has been conducted at the National Estuarine Research Reserves into the sources, character and impacts of polluted runoff. This booklet reports the latest findings on sources of runoff pollution and demonstrates how water quality impacts aquatic habitats.

GNBLPE122DL/Booklet: 28 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Polluted Runoff: Lessons Learned from the National Estuarine Research Reserve System
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This brochure folds out to graphically illustrate sources of runoff, such as forestry, agriculture, urban stormwater, household and automotive care, and construction. The brochure lists community activities that may help reduce the impact of runoff and pollution entering nearby waterways. Regional EPA nonpoint source coordinators are listed for more information.

GNBRPE51DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00
 
Pollution Prevention Fact Sheet: Septic System Controls
Storm Water Center

Septic system source control refers to the use of outreach programs to educate homeowners about the proper operation and maintenance of their septic systems to reduce the likelihood of failure. This fact sheet describes the effectiveness, cost and limitations of a homeowner education program.

WWFSPE129DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Potential Effects of Water Softener Use on Septic Tank Soil Absorption On-Site Wastewater Systems
The National Sanitaiton Foundation

This research was performed to answer concerns that water softener recharge wastes adversely affect the performance of onsite wastewater treatment systems. Study results found that water softener waste effluents caused no operational problems in anaerobic or aerobic onsite residential treatment systems. Septic tank effluents containing water softeners have significant amounts of calcium and magnesium that counteract the effect of sodium and maintain soil permeability. The studies concluded that it was better to discharge water softener waste to septic tank systems than to separate dry wells or ditches; the only disadvantage being additional water passing through the wastewater treatment system.

WWBKRE21DL/Book: 104 pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00
 
POU Adsorption Study for Removal of Arsenic
Penn State Harrisburg, Small Public Water Systems Technology Assistance Center

To achieve the maximum contaminant level of 10 micrograms per liter in accordance with the arsenic rule of January 2001, many small water systems may choose point-of-use (POU) devices such as activated alumina, ion exchange, iron-based sorption media, specialty sorption media or reverse osmosis. This fact sheet presents performance results from a case study of a town in Pennsylvania using 9 different POU devices.

DWFSGN81DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Predicting Attenuation of Viruses During Percolation in Soils 1. Probabilistic Model
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

EPA's Office of Water is currently promulgating a Ground Water Rule to ensure water supplies are safe from contamination by viruses. The Rule clarifies the conditions that define risk to public water systems from viruses. This document presents the conceptual and theoretical development of a predictive screening model for virus attenuation above aquifers.

GNBLRE55DL/Booklet: 43pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Preliminary Risk Assessment for Viruses in Municipal Sewage Sludge Applied to Land
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

This preliminary risk assessment study focuses on the probability of human infection from enteric viral pathogens in municipal sludge applied to land. The study is based on the Pathogen Risk Assessment (PRA) computer model and methodology described in Pathogen Risk Assessment for Land Application of Municipal Sludge (EPA, 1989). This study includes results from a literature review on pathogenic viruses and the results of several site-specific computer simulations running the PRA model with a wide range of values for the parameters required. Six sites were chosen to provide diversity in geographic location, topography, soil type, rainfall pattern, and temperature.

WWBKRE16DL/Book: 190 pp. (1992)

Price: $0.00


 
Preparing for a Sanitary Survey: Information to Help Small Water Systems
Washington State Department of Health, Division of Environmental Health; Office of Drinking Water

A routine sanitary survey is a periodic inspection of a water systems' facilities, operations, and records. These inspections often reveal conditions that may endanger public health. This small booklet, produced by the state of Washington, clearly and simply describes the process. Checklists and operations and maintenance schedules are included.

DWBLOM126DL/Booklet: 32 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Preparing for the Unexpected: An Assessment Process for Small Wastewater Systems
National Environmental Services Center

This issue is intended to serve as a guide for decision makers when considering the vulnerability of their wastewater treatment system. Also discussed are recognizing your system's assets, identifying potential threats, defining the system's vulnerability to these threats, and developing a plan of action in response to the emergency. The end result of this process is an improved ability to prioritize and implement effective actions, safeguarding your community's public health, economic assets, and environment.

SFPLNL32DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Preparing Sewage Sludge for Land Application or Surface Disposal: A Guide for Preparers of Sewage Sludge on the Monitoring, Record Keeping, and Reporting Requirements of the Federal Standards for the Use or Disposal of Sewage Sludge, 40 CFR Part 503
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This book describes Part 503 requirements for preparing sewage sludge or a material derived from sewage sludge. Part 503 regulations establish monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements; pollutant limits; operational standards; and management practices. The book discusses requirements for sewage sludge that is applied to land, placed on a surface disposal site, or incinerated in a sewage sludge-only incinerator.

WWBKRG44DL/Book: 52 pp. (1993)

Price: $0.00
 
Preparing Your Drinking Water Consumer Confidence Report: Revised Guidance for Water Suppliers
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Consumers have the right to know what is in their drinking water and where that water comes from. The Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996 require that all community water systems provide their customers with an annual consumer confidence report (CCR) that summarizes information systems already collect to comply with current regulations. This EPA booklet was created to help water suppliers write their CCRs and includes information on content, timing, and distribution, plus sample reports.

DWBKMG19DL/Book: 66 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Presentations from the Five Radionuclides Rule Implementaiton Workshops held in 2007
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

A radionuclide is an unstable form of a nuclide. They may occur naturally, but can also be artificially produced. They are also known as radioactive isotopes. Drinking water can become contaminated by these dangerous forms thereby endangering the public health. The USEPA held a workshop in 2007 bringing water professionals and regulators together to share information about the regulations as they apply to these contaminants. The slide presentations from this workshop are offered in this download.

DWCDRG121DL/Multiple zip files: 0 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Preventing On-lot Sewage System Malfunctions
Penn State University, College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

For most people living in rural areas, sewage collection, treatment, and disposal must be accomplished onsite. Properly designed and installed onsite sewage systems provide adequate treatment and disposal of liquid household wastes. Still, some onsite systems malfunction for the following four reasons: faulty installation, hydraulic overloading, biological overloading, or lack of maintenance. This fact sheet discusses these malfunctions and suggests potential remedies for each. The fact sheet also includes diagrams of a typical onsite sewage system and a cross-section of a typical two-chamber septic tank. Although intended for Pennsylvania residents, public health officials across the country can use the information in this fact sheet as part of a homeowner education program. State regulatory agencies, local officials, general public, state officials, public health officials, and contractors/developers may also find this information useful.

WWFSPE70DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00


 
Preventing Pollution Through Efficient Water Use
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This brochure describes efficient water use and its role in preventing pollution while protecting and conserving water resources. Tips for individuals and communities are provided.

WWBRPE26DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (1990)

Price: $0.00
 
Primer on Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)
Pollution Probe

This book discusses volatile organic compounds: what they are, where they come from, the health effects associated with exposure to them, and ways to remove them from drinking water.

DWBKPE427DL/Book: 56 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Proceedings of the First National Expert and Stakeholder Workshop on Water Infrastructure Sustainability and Adaptation to Climate Change
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Office of Water

This booklet contains the proceedings of the first national expert and stakeholder workshop about infrastructure sustainability and adapting to climate change.

DWBKMG157DL/Book: 136 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
Process Design Manual: Land Treatment of Municipal Wastewater Effluents
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

Land treatment is the application of appropriately treated municipal and industrial wastewater on the land at a controlled rate in an environmentally sound manner. This manual describes the three principal land treatment processes: slow rate, overland flow and soil aquifer treatment (also known as rapid infiltration). This manual provides design critera for the planning, design, construction and operation of land treatment systems. Many tables and graphics are included.

WWBKDM110DL/Book: 194pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Promoting the National Source Water Collaborative's Call to Action: Your Water. Your Decision
Source Water Collaborative

The Source Water Collaborative, a group of federal, state and local entities, has united to protect America's drinking water at the source–specifically the lakes, rivers, streams and aquifers used for drinking purposes. This guide gives local decision-makers a look at their options for protecting sources of their water. These actions vary from development restrictions to budgeting considerations.

DWFSMG109DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Proposed Ground Water Rule: Questions and Answers
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The EPA proposed to further protect U.S. drinking water by requiring action to protect groundwater sources from disease-causing viruses and bacteria. This fact sheet helps people learn more about groundwater protection and how this rule will contribute to public health.

DWFSRG60DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Proteccion de sus Ninos del plomo en el agua potable (Protecting Your Kids From Lead In Drinking Water)
New York City Department of Environmental Protection and National Environmental Services Center

This Spanish-language brochure provides information about lead poisoning in children, how lead occurs in drinking water, what precautions to take in the home, and how to improve plumbing to reduce lead exposure.

DWBRPE28DL/Brochure: 2pp. (1993)

Price: $0.00
 
Protect Our Health From Source to Tap: National Drinking Water Program Highlights
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

A variety of safeguards form multiple barriers against contamination in public water supplies in the U.S. This pocket-sized booklet explains how our drinking water is protected through regulations, standards, and best management practices for preventing contamination.

DWBLPE121DL/Booklet: 50 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Protect Water Resources—Understand Pesticide Movement
University of Arizona, College of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension

The impacts of pesticides on surface and groundwater are a serious matter. This fact sheet examines different ways that pesticides travel through the environment, including discussion about how varying chemical properties, as well as localized soil characteristics, can influence this movement. Reference tables for assessing the risk of groundwater contamination from over 25 common pesticides and a list of management strategies for preventing contamination are also provided.

DWFSPE208DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2011)

Price: $0.00
 
Protect Your Family: Test Your Wells Water Quality Today–A Guide to Water Quality Testing for Private Wells in Rhode Island
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency New England; Rhode Island Department of Health, Office of Drinking Water Qualtiy; University of Rhode Island

If you have a private well as a drinking water source, water quality testing is important to you and your family. Some contaminants pose a risk to human health. This pamphlet describes the recommended tests for the well water. Information about when to test and what the tests tell you is included.

DWBRPE372DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Protect Your Family: Test Your Well’s Water Quality Today–A Guide to Water Quality Testing for Private Wells
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, Drinking Water Program

If you have a private well as a drinking water source, water quality testing is important to you and your family. Some contaminants pose a risk to human health. This pamphlet describes the recommended tests for the well water. Information about when to test and what the tests tell you is included.

DWBRPE371DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00
 
Protect Your Family: Test your Well’s Water Quality Today–A Guide to Water Quality Testing for Private Wells
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, Water Supply Engineering Bureau

If you have a private well as a drinking water source, water quality testing is important to you and your family. Some contaminants pose a risk to human health. This pamphlet describes the recommended tests for the well water. Information about when to test and what the tests tell you is included.

DWBRPE373DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Protect Your Water for Life: Vulnerability Assesment Fact Sheet
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet shows how vulnerability assessments help water systems evaluate susceptibility to potential threats and identify corrective actions that can reduce or mitigate the risk of serious consequences from adversarial actions. This sheet also shows what to consider when making the assessment.

DWBLMG73DL/Fact Sheet: 8pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Protect Yourself & Your Family's Health: Test your Well's Drinking Water Qualiy Today
State of Connecticut, Department of Public Health

If your family uses a private well for drinking water, water quality testing should be an important part of your household routine. This pamphlet gives homeowners information about the contaminants they should be concerned about, provides a list of steps to take to protect a well from contamination, and what the tests reveal.

DWBRPE387DL/Brochure: 2pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Protecting Drinking Water Through Underground Injection Control
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

More than 750 billion gallons of hazardous and non-hazardous fluids are disposed of through underground injection. The Underground Injection Control (UIC) program insures that these fluids are disposed of safely and cost effectively while protecting underground sources of drinking water. This illustrated booklet describes UIC basics and the minimum federal requirements for an effective UIC program.

DWBLPE133DL/Booklet: 40 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Protecting Drinking Water Through Wellhead Protection
Minnesota Department of Health, Division of Environmental Health, Source Water Protection Unit, Wellhead Protection Program

Drinking water wells become polluted when substances that are harmful to human health get into the groundwater. This pamphlet, as part of a statewide effort to protect public wells, describes some possible sources of drinking water pollution. Some typical action items in a wellhead protection plan are described.

DWBRPE390DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Protecting Drinking Water: County Partnerships That Work
National Association of Counties

To most citizens, clean drinking water is a common expectation. But this expectation can easily turn to dismay in the event of contamination. This booklet, offers four case studies of source water protection plans. Local officials and city planners will find it useful to see the various strategies used to protect drinking water sources.

DWBLMG111DL/Booklet: 29 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Protecting Our Water Resources: A Guide for Source Protection of Drinking Water
Lakehead Region Conservation Authority

Source protection is the risk management of untreated surface water and groundwater that supplies community drinking water systems from contamination and overuse. The least costly way to protect water is to prevent water pollution and overuse from occurring in the first place. This booklet provides landowners with tips on taking responsibility for their actions that can impact source water.

DWBLPE360DL/Booklet: 12pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Protecting Sources of Drinking Water: Selected Case Studies in Watershed Management
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

Drinking water utilities across the country are engaged in innovative and successful source water protection programs. This publication presents case studies of 17 water systems that have worked with local watershed management initiatives to restore and protect aquatic ecosystems. Though diverse in their watershed management experiences, the common thread among all the water systems is the importance of cross-program coordination.

DWBLMG33DL/Booklet: 48 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Protecting Vulnerable People from Drinking Water Disease and Illness
Campaign for Safe and Affordable Drinking Water

This publication addresses drinking water concerns for vulnerable populations such as children, the elderly, pregnant women, and people having a compromised immune system. Information on common drinkgawter contaminates such as Cryptosporidium and other microbes which cause waterborne illness, nitrates, lead and Trihalomethanes is presented in a question and answer format. The recommended actions to reduce or eliminate the risk of exposure to such contaminates are described.

DWFSPE315DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Protecting Water Quality from Agricultural Runoff
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Nonpoint Source Control Branch

Did you know that runoff from farms is the leading source of impairments to surveyed rivers and lakes? This fact sheet briefly discusses the impact of agricultural runoff on water resources and outlines methods that farmers and ranchers can use to prevent and control nonpoint source pollution. The fact sheet also lists funding sources and related publications and websites.

DWFSGN74DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Protecting Water Resources with Smart Growth
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

As studies have shown, growth and development can have profound effects on our water resources. One factor related to persistent water pollution problems is our development patterns. This book has guidance to help minimize the growth impact on our source waters and ways to protect source waters.

DWBKMG167DL/Book: 116pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Protecting Water Resources with Smart Growth
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

How are zoning codes and building designs related to standards established by the Clean Water Act? How do transportation choices or the mix of uses in a district affect the quality and quantity of stormwater runoff? How are development patterns associated with protecting the nation’s water resources, including lakes, rivers, streams, and aquifers? This book answers those questions. It includes information about strategic development areas, funding and fee structures, and regulatory innovations.

DWBKMG182DL/Book: 116pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Protecting Well Water in Coastal Communities
NC State University, Cooperative Extension

This booklet discusses how to protect well water in coastal communities and includes information about determining a well's condition, the water's safety, and well maintenance.

DWBLPE438DL/Fact Sheet: 12 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Protecting Your Dinking Water Through A Source Water Assessment and Protection Plan: A "How To" Workbook for Communities and Watershed Groups
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Drinking Water Branch

Source water protection is achieved through identifying the various components, influences and possible contamination areas. This workbook is a guide for communities and watershed groups interested in developing and implementing an assessment and protection plan for watersheds.

DWBLOM116DL/Booklet: 31 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00
 
Protecting Your Source Water—Volunteers Help Get the Job Done
National Environmental Services Center

Small communities should take advantage of local volunteers to complete environmental projects that help protect local waters. This issue gives local leaders tips on recruiting, training and advice on how to fully utilize their local volunteer workforce.

SFPLNL51DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Protecting Your Water and Septic System
University of Georgia, The Georgia HOME*A*SYST Program

Properly maintaining your home’s septic system is important both as a means to protect your investment and your community’s environmental health. This pamphlet describes how septic systems work and provides a risk assessment for the homeowner to complete, helping to keep the septic system functioning correctly.

WWFSPE143DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Protecting Your Water Quality Through a Farm & Home Assessment
USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service; USDA Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

About 95 percent of the people who live in the country get water from groundwater or a rain water collection system. These systems can be very safe but must be properly constructed and maintained or they can become contaminated. This booklet helps rural homeowners determine how safe their water supply is from pollutants. By responding to the assessment questions, rural residents learn about proper pesticide and petroleum storage, household hazardous waste disposal, wastewater treatment and cistern maintenance.

DWBKPE351DL/Book: 79 pp. (NA)

Price: $0.00


 
Protecting Your Well
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

Private well owners are responsible for selecting a treatment option for correcting a water contamination event. This fact sheet offers information about choosing the best treatment option for any given situation. Tables provide information about specific contaminants and the treatment recommended for its removal and the estimated costs associated with these options.

DWFSPE420DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Protecting Your Well and Wellhead
The University of Georgia, Cooperative Extension Service

Proper protection of your well and wellhead is essential for the health of your family, yourself, and your neighbors. This fact sheet describes the six principles of well head protection. Using these guide lines will help ensure the safety of your well water.

DWFSPE367DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Protecting Your Wellhead
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

The wellhead is the structure built over your well to protect its various parts. By protecting your wellhead, you will ensure the quality of your drinking water supply. This fact sheet advises well-owners about activities that can contaminate the water supply or damage the well itself.

DWFSPE415DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Protocol for Conducting Environmental Compliance Audits for Public Water Systems Under the Safe Drinking Water Act
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Enforcement and Compliance Assurance

The U.S. EPA must ensure that businesses and organizations comply with federal laws that protect the public health and the environment. The agency developed these audit protocols for individuals who are already familiar with the federal regulations but need a comprehensive checklist to conduct audits at regulated facilities.

DWBKMG36DL/Book: 172 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Providing Safe Drinking Water In America: 2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance

This is an annual report prepared by EPA under SDWA requirements. This report provides information on the compliance status of public water systems. This report also discusses various activities of EPA since the passage of SDWA amendments to capitalize on opportunities and authorities provided by those amendments. These include: promotion of public information and involvement; providing tools to states, tribes, and water systems to improve compliance; helping small systems provide safe drinking water; focusing safety standards on the most serious health risks; and exercising new enforcement authorities and undertaking compliance activities.

DWBKRG49DL/Book: 93 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
Providing Safe Drinking Water in America: 2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance

Using information from the Safe Drinking Water Information System (federal version), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency prepares and annual compliance report, detailing the number of public water systems meeting mandated standards. This report details compliance information for calendar year 2006.

DWBKGN86DL/Book: 89 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Public Notification Handbook for Transient Noncommunity Water Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This handbook explains the Public Notification Rule as it applies to transient noncommunity water systems. In particular, the guide shows the actions these systems must take when a notice must be issued because of a violation or situation affecting the water supply.

DWBKRG131DL/Book: 112 pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00
 
Public Notification Rule: A Quick Reference Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Water systems must notify their customers when they violate EPA or state drinking water standards (including monitoring requirements). EPA has revised the existing Public Notification Rule to better tailor the form, manner, and timing of the notices to the relative risk to health. This fact sheet explains the revised rule, which makes notification easier and more effective for both water systems and the customers they serve.

DWFSRG83DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Quality Control for Homeowners
National Environmental Services Center

Most septic system failures can be attributed to poor design and improper installation. This issue of Pipeline provides tips for homeowners to ensure that the installation of their septic system is done properly.

SFPLNL48DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Quality Development and Stormwater Runoff: What you can do to reduce flooding, erosion and pollution
Watershed Committee of the Ozarks

This fact sheet discusses and illustrates methods to properly manage stormwater runoff by highlighting several residential, commercial, and industrial best management practices that can help reduce flooding, erosion, and pollution. Common runoff pollutants are identified as being heavy metals, pesticides, fertilizers, bacteria, and soil sediments.

GNFSPE07DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Quality of Our Nation's Waters: Nutrients and Pesticides
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey

This report is the first in a series of nontechnical publications, The Quality of Our Nation's Waters, that describes the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program's major findings on water-quality issues of regional and national concern. As part of the NAWQA Program, the USGS works with other federal, state, and local agencies to understand the spatial extent of water quality, how water quality changes with time, and how human activities and natural factors affect water quality across the nation. This first report discusses nutrients and pesticides in water and pesticides in bed sediment and fish tissue. It is intended primarily for those involved in resource management, conservation, regulation, and policy making at regional and national levels.

GNBKGN16DL/Book: 88 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Quality of Water from Public-Supply Wells in the United States, 1993-2007: Overview of Major Findings
U.S. Geological Survey

This report, undertaken as part of the national water-quality assessment program, provides the major findings of water quality taken from public-supply wells in the U.S. between 1993 and 2007.

DWBKGN89DL/Book: 68 pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00


 
Quantifying Site-Scale Processes and Watershed-Scale Cumulative Effects of Decentralized Wastewater Sytems
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This download describes research conducted by the Colorado School of Mines, the Electric Power Research Institute, Systech Engineering Inc., the U.S. Geological Survey, and the Summit County Environmental Health Department, including participation by a stakeholder group in the study area.

The researchers goal was to enhance the quantitative understanding of site-scale processes that affect onsite wastewater systems performance and to develop modeling tools that can describe and predict individual system performance as well as the cumulative effects of multiple systems on water quality within a watershed. Research included literature reviews, laboratory experiments, field monitoring, the development and refinement of mathematical models and completion of site-scale and watershed-scale model simulations.

WWBKRE45DL/Books: 599 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Questions to Ask When Purchasing Home Water Treatment Equipment
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Home water treatment service and supply companies and products promise to deliver drinking water that is safer than publicly treated water. This fact sheet helps educate consumers, listing types of equipment, their methods of treating water, and questions that will make for a more informed decision.

DWFSPE250DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Radionuclide Removal for Small Public Water Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Drinking Water

Radionuclides are chemical elements with an unstable atomic nucleus that spontaneously decay, producing radiation. This technical guide discusses how to define a radionuclide problem in water, develop and evaluate proposed solutions, and explain the costs and control methods to consumers.

DWBKDM12DL/Book: 170 pp. (1983)

Price: $0.00
 
Radionuclides in Drinking Water: A Small Entity Compliance Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

Some elements, either natural or man-made, are unstable and emit particles of energy. These radioactive element are radionuclides. EPA has limits in drinking water for four types of these elements. If you own or operate a community water system, this Guide will help you understand a rule that applies to you by describing the minimum Federal requirements under the Radionuclides rules.

DWBLMG130DL/Booklet: 33 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Radionuclides Notice of Data Availability Technical Support Document
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

This document contains information about the occurrence, health effects, analytical methods, and treatment options for redionuclides in drinking water and presents data about the costs and benefits that were considered in promulgating the Radionuclides Rule.

DWBKRG84DL/Book: 164 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Radionuclides Rule: A Quick Reference Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Radionuclides are a significant health issue in drinking water contamination. Releases from medical facilities and nuclear power plants add to the threat from naturally occurring radionuclides. Water operators can quickly review the requirements for implementing the Radionuclides Rule, which mandates reduction of these chemicals in drinking water, with this fact sheet. Included are an overview of the rule, a list of the contaminants, critical deadlines and requirements, and monitoring requirements for water systems.

DWFSRG66DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Radium in Your Drinking Water ( A Homeowner's Guide)
Maryland Department of the Environment

What are the health risks for radium ingestion? This fact sheet answers these questions and more for homeowners. This fact sheet to answer these questions about radium, possible health risks, and water testing and treatment options.

DWFSPE320DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Radium Removal from Water by Manganese Dioxide Adsorption and Diatomaceous Earth Filtration
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory

This document summarizes the results of a project to study the efficiency of diatomaceous earth (DE) filtration in treating radium contaminated water. It includes the results of pilot studies performed in Lemont, Illinois, using DE filtration and multimedia filtration.

DWBLRE07DL/Fact Sheet: 8 pp. (1992)

Price: $0.00


 
Radon & Groundwater
Water Systems Council

This fact sheet explains radon and groundwater, how to test for radon, and ways to eliminate it from drinking water.

DWFSPE430DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Radon in Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Radon is a radioactive colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas. Although there currently is no drinking water standard for radon, the EPA recommends that action be taken when there is an elevated level of radon found in a home.

DWFSPE302DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Rainwater Cisterns; Design, Construction, and Water Treatment
Penn State College of Agriculture Sciences, Cooperative Extension

This illustrated booklet explains the design and construction of roof catchment cisterns that collect and store rainwater for household and other uses. Design details, such as size and location, construction procedures, maintenance, and treatment of the cistern water, are explained.

DWBLDM02DL/Booklet: 16 pp. (1982)

Price: $0.00
 
Recirculating Sand Filters: A General Overview
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet provides an overview of recirculating sand filters and how they are used in onsite wastewater treatment.

WWFSGN103DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Recirculating Sand Filters: A Technical Overview
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet is intended to help people who are weighing treatment options by giving a technical overview of recirculating sand filters (RSFs) and how they are used in wastewater treatment. The fact sheet describes how RSFs work, the basic components of the system, design information, and performance characteristics. A typical RSF system is illustrated, and case studies are provided, in addition to information on advantages and disadvantages, operation and maintenance requirements, and cost.

WWFSOM25DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Recirculating Sand/Gravel Filters for On-Site Treatment of Domestic Wastes
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Biological Systems Engineering, College of Agricultural and Life Science

This booklet provides an overview of recirculating sand filter principles, design, construction, and maintenance. Sand filter technology has been available for many years but new advances, as well as increased environmental regulations, have made the technology more attractive and reliable.

WWBLDM87DL/Booklet: 25pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Recommendations on Payments for Ecosystem Services in Integrated Water Resources Management
United Nations, Convention on the Protection and Use of Transboundary Watercourses and International Lakes

Payments for ecosystem services (PES) have the potential to be an environmentally effective, economically efficient and socially equitable tool for implementing integrated water resources management (IWRM). PES schemes complement other approaches, such as command-and-control and structural measures. The Recommendations brought forward in this document reflect good practices in order to support Governments at all levels of decision-making (global, regional, transboundary, national and local) in the implementation of PES. They also address joint bodies, such as international river and lake commissions, and other appropriate institutional arrangements for cooperation between riparian countries. These Recommendations should also guide other actors, such as suppliers and users of ecosystem services, in the protection, restoration and sustainable use of water-related ecosystems and the establishment of PES.

DWBKMG200DL/Book: 64pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
Recommended Approach for Conducting a Self Assessment Using the Effective Utility Management Benchmarking Tool
Recommended Approach for Conducting a Self Assessment Using the Effective Utility Management Benchmarking Tool
Water Research Foundation

Utilities are facing significant challenges as they strive to increase the quality and lower the cost of services to their customers. This booklet discusses challenges that include: increased customer level of service demands; financial constraints; aging infrastructure; security and emergency response concerns; growth; climate change and reduced environmental footprint pressures; stricter regulatory requirements; and retirement of experienced staff and related workforce shortages.

DWBLMG225DL/Booklet: 14 pp. (2014)

Price: $0.00


 
Recommended Upgrades for Your Septic Tank: Access Risers, Effluent Screens, & Two Compartment Tanks
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Basic septic tank upgrades can simplify maintenance, improve system function, and protect your drainfield from costly repairs. This fact sheet explains how access risers and effluent screens are low-cost improvements and how a two-compartment tank can save you money.

WWFSPE110DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00
 
Record Keeping Rules: A Quick Reference Guide
Office of Water, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Understanding record keeping is the focus of this brief EPA guide. It discusses the benefits of good record keeping as well as legal requirements for utilities.

DWFSMG170DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Redox Conditions in Selected Principal Aquifers of the United States
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey

Reduction/oxidation (Redox) conditions affect water quality for groundwater in all aquifers. This fact sheet examines these conditions and Redox processes that can alternately mobilize or immobilize potentially toxic but naturally occurring metals.

DWFSRE34DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
Reducing the Cost of Operating Municipal Wastewater Facilities
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Municipal Pollution Control

This pamphlet outlines ways wastewater facilities can identify high-cost problems and methods for cutting operating costs. This booklet discusses cost-reduction programs and ways to identify expensive areas and components.

WWBLFN39DL/Booklet: 4 pp. (1985)

Price: $0.00


Reference Guide for Asset Management Tools
Reference Guide for Asset Management Tools
U.S. Environmental Protection Agncy, Office of Water

Asset management is the practice of managing infrastructure capital assets to minimize the total cost of owning and operating them, while delivering the service level customers desire. This book discusses asset management and how it can open communications between drinking water system staff and decision makers, help move systems from crisis management to informed decision making, facilitate more efficient and focused system operations and improve financial management to make the best use of systems’ limited resources. An asset management plan serves as a tool to record all of a system’s asset management practices and strategies.

DWBKMG221DL/Book: 56 pp. (2014)

Price: $0.00
 
Regulations on the Disposal of Arsenic Residuals from Drinking Water Treatment Plants
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory

With the passage of various federal statutes, restrictions have been placed on the discharge of residuals to water bodies and onto land. This report summarizes federal regulations and selected state regulations that govern management of residuals produced by small drinking water treatment systems removing arsenic from drinking water.

DWBLRG58DL/Booklet: 47 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Rehabilitation of Wastewater Collection and Water Distribution Systems White Paper
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Water Supply and Water Resources Division

As part of the USEPA's Aging Water Infrastructure Research Program, scientific and engineering research is being conducted to evaluate and improve innovative technologies that can reduce costs and improve the effectiveness of the operation and the replacement of aging water and wastewater distribution systems. This White Paper provides an overview of the current state of the art of rehabilitation of the associated pipes and structures.

DWBLMG149DL/Book: 92pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
Removal of Iron and Manganese from Drinking Water - Technical Version
State of New Hampshire, Department of Environmental Services

This fact sheet covers methods to remove iron and manganese from drinking water. It discusses how to choose a home treatment system and the types of treatment system available.

DWFSPE440DL/Fact Sheet: 8 pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00


 
Removing Multiple Contaminants from Drinking Water: Issues to Consider
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Public water systems that need to add treatment for one contaminant may find that they also have other water quality concerns. Choosing a treatment technology that can remove several co-occurring contaminants may be more efficient and cost effective. This large poster describes treatment technologies that can remove multiple contaminants, identifies the contaminants that can be removed, and summarizes related operational and waste disposal issues.

DWPSOM106DL/Poster: 1 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Repair of Failing Onsite Wastewater Systems
Mississippi State Department of Health, Bureau of General Environmental Services, Division of Onsite Wastewater

In recent years, the potential for groundwater and surface water pollution from individual onsite wastewater disposal systems has emerged as a serious concern in the US. Proper repair of these malfunctioning sewage systems is essential. This resource manual, produced by the Mississippi State Department of Health, is intended to illustrate best management practices. It describes problems and specific malfunctions of existing systems, and recommends repair options used to overcome specific soils and site conditions.

WWBKGN275DL/Book: 62pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00

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