CART HELP
. How To Use
. View All Products
. Who We Are
. Contact Us

Drinking Water (DW) Product Categories
. Case Studies
. Design
. Finance
. General Information
. Management
. On Tap
. O & M
. Public Education
. Regulations
. Research
. Tech Briefs
. Training

Waste Water (WW) Product Categories
. Case Studies
. Design
. Finance
. General Information
. Management
. O & M
. Pipeline
. Public Education
. Regulations
. Research
. Small Flows
. Tech Overviews
. Training

Moving Our Inventory to Better Serve You

Because moving our inventory online is a work in progress, you may not find everything you want or need today. You may see a message that says, No products are currently available in this category. But don't worry! You can still use our current list and order as usual while our shelves are being filled. To order from the catalog, Download the 2010 NESC Products Catalog pdf file (932 KB in size). Eventually all of our products will be available to you through the Free Shopping Cart. We welcome your comments about this service.



Home » All Products

 Checkout
 
Interviews with Local Government Officials—Gaining Public Support for Water Infrastructure Costs: Braman, Oklahoma
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The mayor of Braman, OK, shares his town's experiences updating infrastructure related to drinking water, electricity, and wastewater.

DWFSOM123DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Interviews with Local Government Officials—Gaining Public Support for Water Infrastructure Costs: Freeport, Illinois
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The former mayor of Freeport, IL shares his experiences with the town's response to EPAs regulations of sanitary sewer systems and the lack of public support for these infrastructure improvements.

DWFSOM122DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Interviews with Local Government Officials—Gaining Public Support for Water Infrastructure Costs: Salem, Oregon
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Director of Public Works for the municipality of Salem, Oregon retells the history of the city's water infrastructure needs and solutions. The conversation details how a sustained public outreach campaign resulted in an open and responsive relationship between the water utility, its users, and Salem's elected officials.

DWFSOM120DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Interviews with Local Government Officials—Gaining Public Support for Water Infrastructure Costs; Gloucester, Massachusetts
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The former mayor and current city council member of Gloucester, Massachusetts shares his town's innovative approaches to cost-effective, efficient sewer systems and capital improvements and how they gained public support for these projects.

DWFSOM121DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Introduction to the IWRM guidelines at River Basin level
UN Water

These guidelines provide the necessary information to help practitioners implement Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) in line with their own set of circumstances. They consist of the fundamental concepts of IWRM as well as provide insights into the perspectives of various stakeholders with regard to water issues, keys for success for overcoming problems, and good examples where such keys for success were applied. It is an instruction manual that synthesizes practical methodologies for IWRM to help implement IWRM at the river basin level. IWRM is essentially a user-friendly and cooperative approach that is an alternative to the activities previously carried out by individual water sectors acting in their own interests, with very little interaction with one another. The guidelines invite each sector to participate and cooperate in IWRM, with a practical road map so as to contribute to achieving both private and public benefits in a sustainable manner.

DWBLMG190DL/Booklet: 41pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
Introduction to Watershed Planning
U.S. Environmental Protection Agnecy,

This publication is adapted from an online training module of the EPA's Watershed Academy Web. This module takes a look at what is needed to develop a successful watershed plan. The three phases of watershed planning including building local partnerships, plan development, and implementation and evaluation are described. A handy self-test is also provided.

DWBLPE398DL/Booklet: 28 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Inventory of Potential Contaminant Sources in Washington's Wellhead Protection Areas
Washington State Department of Health, Environmental Health Programs

This booklet provides guidance in designing and conducting inventories of potential sources of ground water contamination in Washington's Wellhead Protection Areas. Recommendations on the identification and prioritization of potential contaminants are included. Appendices include a table of commercial land use and the potential for hazardous waste generation, answers to common questions about local wellhead protection programs, as well as a sample inventory form.

DWBLMG140DL/Booklet: 34 pp. (1993)

Price: $0.00
 
Ion Exchange Treatment of Drinking Water Supplies
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Part of the Private Wells Series, this pamphlet offers consumer advice on the purchase of ion exchange water treatment device. Questions to ask before you buy are included.

DWFSPE308DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Iowa Handbook for Enabling Legal Mechanisms for Wastewater Management
National Environmental Services Center

This handbook covers the applicable laws and administrative rules that govern the use of onsite systems in Iowa (2004). The handbook includes financing options, management structures, and other considerations for onsite wastewater treatment systems.

DPBLMG36DL/Booklet: 44 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Iron
Water Systems Council

While not a direct public health threat, iron and manganese can affect water’s taste. This fact sheet discusses iron and manganese, and offers tips about eliminating these secondary contaminants.

DWFSPE433DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Iron and Magnese in Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

While not considered a health hazard, iron and manganese can affect the flavor and color of food and water. This fact sheet lists sources of iron and manganese, describes their effects, and offers suggestions of ways to treat water for these substances.

DWFSPE299DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Iron Bacteria Problems in Wells
State of Wisconsin , Department of Natural Resources

Iron bacteria combine with mineral iron or manganese in the water with oxygen and use it to form rust-colored deposits that build up on well screens, pipes, and plumbing fixtures. This brochure offers basic information on the nature of iron bacteria problems, how to prevent them, and what to do about them if they occur.

DWBROM28DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Iron in Drinking Water
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Drinking Water & Groundwater

Iron is one of the earth's most plentiful resources, making up at least five percent of the earth's crust. Iron is not considered hazardous to health, but may be a secondary or aesthetic contaminant in drinking water. This fact sheet discusses the types of iron that may cause staining and odors and includes a table outlining treatment solutions to help alleviate problems.

DWFSGN46DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Is Septic Waste Affecting Drinking Water From Shallow Domestic Wells Along the Platte River in Eastern Nebraska?
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey

In Nebraska, a large number of shallow wells are used to obtain drinking water for private households. In 2003, researchers conducted a study to determine if septic waste affected drinking water quality from domestic wells along the Platte River. This fact sheet reveals the results of this study.

WWFSPE130DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Is There Lead in my Drinking Water?
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The answer is in a free brochure from EPA, which offers tips for protecting families from lead in drinking water. The brochure answers frequently asked questions, such as how lead gets into water, what you should do if you suspect lead in your water, and whether you should have your children tested. The brochure also offers a list of quick tips for reducing your family's exposure to lead and provides contacts for more information.

DWFSPE313DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Is Your Community's Drinking Water At Risk? Misused Septic Systems Can Cost Millions
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

Some U.S. commercial and industrial businesses that don't have access to sewer systems have relied on shallow underground disposal for their wastewater, either in cesspools or in septic tanks. This booklet explains how these misused disposal methods can contaminate water and how communities can act to protect their drinking water supplies.

DWBRPE91DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00


 
Is Your Proposed Wastewater Project Too Costly? Options for Small
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet provides general information to small community decision makers and residents about how to choose an appropriate wastewater treatment technology, what to do if sewers or treatment facilities are too expensive, and how to determine whether a wastewater project is too costly. Brief definitions and illustrations for various onsite and centralized treatment and collection technologies are provided.

WWBLPE01DL/Booklet: 8 pp. (1984)

Price: $0.00
 
Is Your Water Safe? What You Need to Know
National Groundwater Association

A simple water test can tell if your drinking water is safe. This fact sheet outlines several options for independently testing your water and lists common tests for contaminants such as nitrates, lead, and iron.

DWFSPE264DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Is Your Well Water Safe to Drink?
Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Environmental and Occupational Health Program

Many Maine wells have too much arsenic, radon and uranium. This brochure explains to homeowners the why, when and how of well water testing. A contact list of all Maine water testing labs is included.

DWBRPE422DL/Booklet: 4pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
It's Your Choice: A Guidebook for Local Officials on Small Community Wastewater Management Options
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Municipal Pollution Control

This book examines choices that small community officials have to solve their communities' current wastewater problems or to address future wastewater needs. It discusses the steps needed to define the problem, select a consulting engineer, and finance a system. The book identifies where to turn for help and how to make your wastewater system self-sustaining by setting up appropriate user fees.

FMBKGN01DL/Book: 83 pp. (1987)

Price: $0.00


 
It's YOUR Drinking Water: Get to Know it and Protect it!
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

As a consumer you have a right to know whether your public drinking water meets national safety standards. This booklet outlines several sources of information, like consumer confidence reports, state compliance reports, public notification rules, and source water assessments, to help with questions you might have.

DWBLPE113DL/Booklet: 8 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
IWRM as a Tool for Adaptation to Climate Change: Training Manual and Facilitator's Guide
Cap-net, United Nations Development Program (UNDP)

This training manual and facilitator’s guide is intended to introduce general concepts and the practical application of integrated water resources management (IWRM) as an instrument for adaptation to climate change. The manual targets participants in courses about climate change adaption who are looking for conceptual and practical knowledge, and capacity builders who conduct short training courses about IWRM and climate change adaptation. Teachers and moderators/facilitators are encouraged to adapt the materials to their particular regional or local contexts, tailoring the adaptation strategies and actions to each set of unique conditions as needed. The document is structured in two main sections: a training manual and a facilitator’s guide. The first part, the training manual, provides concepts, strategies, developments and guidance on the use of IWRM principles and functions, particularly at the river basin level, for adaptation to climate change manifestations and impacts. The second section of the document consists of a facilitators’ guide that provides capacity builders with practical guidance for the organization and conduct of courses or educational programs on the subject.

DWBKMG197DL/Book: 128pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
IWRM for Sustainable use of Water. 50 Years of International Experience with the Concept of Integrated Water Management
Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, The Netherlands

This background document provides a brief overview of Integrated Water Resource Management and includes examples of the approach to illustrate the numerous ways the approach may be interpreted. Six chapters comprise the document, including a brief historical description, the relationship between water management and ecosystems, and the evolution of water management as water becomes scarcer.

DWBLMG189DL/Booklet: 16pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
IWRM Guidelines at River Basin Level Part 1: Principals
International Hydrological Program (IHP), Network of Asian River Basin Organizations (NARBO)

Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) can play a key role in addressing sanitation, health, poverty alleviation, disaster reduction, and ecosystem conservation, and all eight Millennium Development Goals, in particular its target to reduce, by half, the proportion of the 2.6 billion people without access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation by 2015. Implementing IWRM at the river basin level is an essential element to managing water resources more sustainably, leading to long-term social, economic and environmental benefits. Because water is managed locally, a river basin approach provides a practical framework, defined by geographical and hydrological characteristics, which facilitates implementation of IWRM by involving downstream and upstream basin wide issues as well as incorporating environmental and socio-economic aspects. Part 1 of the IWRM Guidelines at River Basin Level provides basic principles of IWRM mainly targeting policy-makers, and explains the benefits of IWRM at river basin level and the need to promote it at the policy level. It also proposes a spiral model of IWRM, which illustrates the evolving and dynamic nature of the IWRM process.

DWBLMG191DL/Booklet: 25pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
IWRM Guidelines at River Basin Level. Part 2-1: The Guidelines for IWRM Coordination
International Hydrological Program (IHP), Network of Asian River Basin Organizations (NARBO)

The Guidelines for IWRM Coordination is intended for practitioners involved in Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) coordination. It can be used as introductory guidance for those tackling IWRM for the first time, or as training material for intermediary practitioners and trainers of IWRM. For IWRM experts, it can be used as a reference guide to tackle the various issues and problems they face in their IWRM activities. IWRM is a step-by-step process and takes time. By responding to changing social, economic and environmental needs or impacts, one can gradually achieve better and sustainable water resources management as if moving up a spiral, through such means as progressively developing water resources in the basin, building a more integrated institutional framework, or improving environmental sustainability.

DWBKMG192DL/Booklet: 174pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
IWRM Guidelines at River Basin Level. Part 2-2: The Guidelines for flood Management
International Hydrological Program (IHP), Network of Asian River Basin Organizations (NARBO)

The Guidelines for Flood Management is intended for Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) practitioners of flood management. The guidelines should be used as an introduction for those tackling IWRM for the first time, or as training material for intermediary practitioners and trainers of IWRM. For IWRM experts, it can be used as a reference guide to tackle the various issues and problems they face in their IWRM activities. The guidelines consist of five parts:

1) Sectoral Perspectives,

2) Key for Success,

3) IWRM Process,

4) Good Examples, and

5) Useful Tools.

These elements are linked by reference indices, which allow you to move from one to another in the way most convenient to you.

DWBKMG193DL/Booklet: 77pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
IWRM Guidelines at River Basin Level. Part 2-3: Invitation to IWRM for Irrigation Practitioners
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)

The Invitation to IWRM for Irrigation Practitioners is intended for Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) practitioners tackling irrigation planning. IWRM is a step-by-step process and takes time. By responding to changing social, economic and environ- mental needs or impacts, one can gradually achieve better and sustainable water resources management as if moving up a spiral, through such means as progressively developing water resources in the basin, building a more integrated institutional framework, or improving environmental sustainability.

DWBLMG194DL/Booklet: 41pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
IWRM Implementation in Basins, Sub-basins and Aquifers: State of the Art Review
International Hydrological Programme of UNESCO, Keith Kennedy, Slobodan Simonovic, Alberto Tejada-Guibert, Miguel de França Doria and José Luis Martin

This paper discusses a state of the art review (SAR), which was one of the tasks carried out during the Sixth Phase of the International Hydrological Program of UNESCO (IHP-VI), from 2002 to 2007, in its Focal Area 2.4 on methodologies for integrated river basin management (IRBM) and updated at the start of the Seventh Phase of IHP (IHP-VII). It consisted of reviewing case history literature related to integrated river basin management (IRBM) and Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). The findings suggest that (i) there are few publicly available detailed references on this topic and (ii) coordination of global – and in some cases regional – efforts to collect case histories of integrated water resources management in basins, sub-basins and aquifers (BSA) can be improved. The following is a summary of the principal conclusions and recommendations presented in the SAR: 1. Case histories should be adequately documented, collected and disseminated Recommendations: a. An electronic library should be developed and well publicized to collect and freely disseminate documents on BSA case histories. b. A model for case histories should also be developed. 2. Information on current IWRM actions should be better coordinated. Recommendations: a. Regional databases of BSAs may be useful to share information and coordinate actions. b. The scale of the efforts should be distinguished as to basins, sub-basins and aquifers.

DWBLMG184DL/Booklet: 21pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Kentucky Handbook Enabling Mechanisms for Wastewater Management
National Environmental Services Center

Approximately 60 to 70 percent of Kentucky residents rely on sewage disposal systems. These systems are being blamed for polluting many of the rivers and streams throughout Kentucky. This book discusses the Kentucky State laws and administrative rules governing the use of wastewater treatment management systems. Topics on financial and managerial options for citizens to build and maintain an onsite wastewater treatment system are also discussed.

DPBLMG52DL/Booklet: 49pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Laboratory Study on the Oxidation of Arsenic III to Arsenic V
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

This study examines the effectiveness of five chemical oxidants, a solid-phase oxidizing media, and ultraviolet radiation in oxidizing arsenic III to arsenic V under a variety of environmental conditions.

DWBKRE21DL/Book: 100 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Lagoon Systems Can Provide Low-Cost Wastewater Treatment
National Environmental Services Center

The Spring 1997 Pipeline explores how lagoon systems use natural and energy-efficient processes to provide low-cost wastewater treatment for communities and individual residences. The newsletter describes how different types of wastewater treatment lagoons work and includes a chart to help identify lagoon problems. It also contains profiles of communities that use lagoons.

SFPLNL09DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
Land Application of Biosolids
New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission

This brochure discusses the application of biosolids to land for soil or vegetation conditioning. It briefly explains the 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 503 rule concerning land application of sludge requirements and practices.

WWBRGN114DL/Brochure: 2pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Land Application of Municipal Sludge
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Municipal Environmental Research Laboratory

This manual presents a rational procedure for designing municipal sludge land application systems. The manual discusses using sludge in agriculture and forestry and for reclaiming disturbed mining lands and marginal lands. The manual presents a two-phased planning approach to site identification, evaluation, and selection, along with information about field investigation.

WWBKDM34DL/Book: 446pp. (1983)

Price: $0.00
 
Land Application of Sewage Sludge and Domestic Septage
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research & Development

This manual provides design information about sewage sludge land application for agricultural, forest, reclamation, and public contact sites. It discusses both regulatory and non-regulatory aspects of applying septage to the land and includes a summary of the Part 503 land application requirements. The appendices provide case studies, regional EPA office information, permit requirements, and measurement conversions.

WWBKDM82DL/Book: 301pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00


 
Land Application of Sewage Sludge: A Guide for Land Appliers on the Requirements of the Federal Standards for the Use or Disposal of Sewage Sludge, 40 CFR Part 503
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance

This book describes how to fully comply with all applicable Part 503 requirements for land application of sewage sludge. The book defines sewage sludge and land application, explaining the principles of the Part 503 Rule and who is considered a land applier.

WWBKRG43DL/Book: 105 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00
 
Large-Scale Dry Sanitation Programs: Preliminary Observations and Recommendations from Urban Experiences in Mexico (English )
Cornell University, Human Dimensions Research Unit, Department of Natural Resources

This report provides an overview of preliminary research addressing selected, urban, large-scale dry sanitation program sites throughout Mexico. The document includes conscise information for communities, practitioners, and policy-makers concerning how dry sanitation programs benefit the delivery of public health services, environmental protection, and urban water management

WWBLRE44DL/Booklet: 19pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Lead and Copper Rule Guidance Manual
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

This second volume of the Lead and Copper Rule guidance manual concentrates on corrosion control treatment and lead service line replacement. Procedures that can be used by water systems to determine the appropriate corrosion control treatment are discussed.

DWBKRG22DL/Book: 213 pp. (1992)

Price: $0.00
 
Lead and Copper Rule Minor Revisions Fact Sheet for State Primacy Agencies
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet describes changes made to the Lead and Copper Rule that took effect in April 2000. The revisions mostly deal with reduction of monitoring, reporting, public education, and some other previous requirements.

DWFSRG95DL/Fact Sheet: 10 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Lead and Copper Rule Minor Revisions: Fact Sheet for Public Water Systems that Serve 3,300 or Fewer Persons
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet for drinking water system serving 3,300 or fewer people summarizes four categories of changes to the Lead and Copper Rule that took effect in April 2000: demonstrating optimal corrosion control, monitoring and reporting, public education, and lead service line replacement. A list of contacts and sources for additional information are included.

DWBLRG87DL/Fact Sheet: 10 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Lead and Copper Rule Minor Revisions: Fact Sheet for Public Water Systems that Serve 3,301 to 50,000 Persons
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet describes changes made to the Lead and Copper Rule that took effect in April 2000. The revisions mostly deal with reduction of monitoring, reporting, public education, and some other previous requirements and are organized into four broad categories: demonstrating optimal corrosion control, monitoring and reporting, public education, and lead service line replacement.

DWFSRG94DL/Fact Sheet: 9 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Lead and Copper Rule Minor Revisions: Fact Sheet for Tribal Water System Owners and Operators
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet for tribal drinking water system owners and operators summarizes four categories of changes to the Lead and Copper Rule that took effect in April 2000 demonstrating optimal corrosion control, monitoring and reporting, public education, and lead service line replacement. A list of contacts and sources for additional information are included.

DWBLRG88DL/Fact Sheet: 9 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Lead and Copper Rule: A Quick Reference Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Lead and copper enter drinking water mainly through corrosion of plumbing materials. Reducing water corrosivity, thereby reducing the potential for lead and copper contamination, is key to protecting public health. This fact sheet provides an overview of the Lead and Copper Rule, describes the public health benefits of lowered lead and copper levels in water, and outlines treatment and sampling requirements for compliance.

DWFSRG98DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Lead in Drinking Water
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Drinking Water & Groundwater

Evidence shows that even moderate levels of lead can be harmful to human health and particularly to the health of small children and developing fetuses. This fact sheet discusses lead in the environment and in drinking water. Recommendations are included for correcting lead contamination in water, including private wells.

DWFSGN60DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Lead In Drinking Water Regulation: Public Education Guidance
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Four sections in this guidance manual summarize public education requirements water suppliers must meet to comply with federal regulations about lead in drinking water. It describes how to develop a public education action plan and how a community-based task force can create a program.

DWBKRG21DL/Book: 86 pp. (1992)

Price: $0.00


 
Lead in Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Lead contamination from drinking water water pipes, fittings, fixtures, and/or solder can cause serious damage to the brain, kidneys, nervous system, and red blood cells. private well owners are responsible for having their own water tested for lead and other harmful contaminants. This fact sheet discusses testing for lead and several ways to eliminate it from a private water source.

DWFSPE297DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Lead in School's Drinking Water
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This book provides information about the effects lead has on children. It explains how to detect lead in school drinking water supplies and how to pinpoint its source. Ways to reduce or eliminate lead in drinking water and personnel training for sampling and remedial programs are included.

DWBLPE06DL/Book: 60 pp. (1989)

Price: $0.00


 
Lead In Your Drinking Water: Actions You Can Take To Reduce Lead In Drinking Water
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This factsheet discusses the health risks associated with lead poisoning and suggests actions that can be taken to reduce lead in drinking water. Definitions of related terms and additional assistance information are provided.

DWBLPE16DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1993)

Price: $0.00
 
Lead Leaching From Submersible Well Pumps
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances

This factsheet explains various aspects of submersible pumps, including lead leaching from brass components and available treatment options to reduce lead levels in drinking water.

DWBLPE154DL/Fact Sheet: 12 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00


 
Learner's Guide to Security Considerations for Small Drinking Water Systems: Major Security Considerations When Performing a Sanitary Survey of a Small Water System
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet identifies and explains major security considerations applicable to small drinking water systems. It is intended to be used by personnel who evaluate small systems for sanitary deficiencies. This publication covers management and source issues related to security concerns, and offers security recommendations for storage facilities, distribution systems and pumps.

DWBKMG143DL/Book: 62pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Legionella: Drinking Water Fact Sheet
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet describes Legionella bacteria, from which legionaires disease originates. Included are various profiles of the bacteria, such as its health effects and route of transmission in humans, its occurrence in the environment, risk factors, and analytical methods for identifying its presence, water treatment methods, and regulatory information from the U.S. EPA.

DWFSPE191DL/Fact Sheet: 3 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Legionella: Drinking Water Health Advisory
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water

Legionella bacteria, pathogens that are widespread in untreated water, were discovered following a pneumonia outbreak at the 1976 American Legion convention in Philadelphia. This document summarizes information regarding Legionella and its health effects and provides informal technical guidance to federal, state, and local officials responsible for protecting public health.

DWBLPE189DL/Booklet: 27 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Legionella: Risk for Infants and Children
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water

This document addresses the occurrence and risk of infection by the Legionella bacteria in children. Sections discuss immunity, specific health effects exhibited by infected children, risk factors, and recommendations for further research.

DWBLPE181DL/Booklet: 13 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Lessons for Private Well Owners from the Maine Public Water Supply Assessments
Maine CDC Drinking Water Program

Development pressure is the biggest threat to drinking water quality in Maine. This brochure presents answers to well owners' questions about contamination risks.

DWPSPE354DL/Poster: 2 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00
 
Let it run. . . and get the lead out! Important information on how to protect your health
Minnesota Department of Health, Division of Environmental Health

The common metal lead can be found in many areas around the home - in lead-based paint, household dust, food and drinking water. And lead buildup can be a special health problem for children whose small bodies absorb lead more rapidly than bigger ones. This fact sheet offers homeowners tips on how to reduce lead in their drinking water.

DWFSPE377DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Linear Regression for Nonpoint Source Pollution Analyses
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

In nonpoint source analyses, linear regression is often used to determine the extent to which the value of a water quality variable is influenced by land use or hydrologic factors. Examples of these factors include crop type, soil type, percentage of land treatment, rainfall, or stream flow. Practical applications of these regression results include the ability to predict water quality impacts due to changes in the independent variables. This fact sheet demonstrates an approach for describing the relationship between variables using regression for nonpoint source pollution analyses. The information is targeted toward people in state water quality monitoring agencies who are responsible for nonpoint source assessments and implementing watershed management.

WWBLRE30DL/Booklet: 8 pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
Literature Review for Septic Siting Study: A Means of Interpreting Past Research on Septic Systems
New York City Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Water Supply

This book summarizes past research studies on existing septic systems to evaluate:

• the transport of pathogens and nutrients to the groundwater, • the transport of these contaminants past 100 feet from the system, and • the reasons for the effectiveness of septic systems to provide treatment.

The book shows that a significant majority of the sites studied in the past do not meet current New York State Department of Health standards. Most of the sites show at least one contaminant was transported to groundwater. The book discusses the history of septic system research and regulation and includes eight data tables and seven appendices of sites investigated for particular contaminants.

WWBKRE38DL/Book: 122 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Literature Review of Methods for Delineating Wellhead Protection Areas
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet presents the result of bibliographic search of the technical literature for publications, papers, and other documents addressing the technical aspects of wellhead protection. The literature summaries are sorted by topic: theory, case studies, land use/mapping/GIS, analytical, modeling, and hydrological analysis.

DWBLMG115DL/Booklet: 31 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Living In A Public Drinking Water Supply Watershed—Protecting The Watershed And Your Backyard
Connecticut Department of Public Health, Drinking Water Division

As rainfall or snow melt moves over the ground it picks up many harmful pollutants which are deposited in our drinking water sources. Pollutants such as sediment, fertilizers, insecticides, bacteria and nutrients, oil and grease are picked up and then make our drinking water unsafe, and destroy habitat. This fact sheet offers residents ways to protect their community's source water and the family's drinking water well.

DWFSPE388DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Local Groups Key to Mousam Lake Restoration
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

For decades, Maine’s Mousam Lake received increased stormwater runoff from shoreland development, lawns, roads and aging septic systems. Phosphorus in the stormwater led to increased algal growth and subsequent impairments to water quality, including decreased water clarity and dissolved oxygen. Following 10 years of intensive nonpoint source (NPS) pollution control projects, water clarity in Mousam is three feet deeper, and the lake now attains water quality standards. The Maine Department of Environmental Protection (MDEP) removed Mousam Lake from its section 303(d) impaired waters list in 2006.

WWFSMG78DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Local Limits Development Guidance
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wastewater Management

This manual provides guidance to municipalities about the development and implementation controls or limits on discharges to publicly owned treatment works (POTW). It also replaces the Guidance Manual on the Development and Implementation of Local Discharge Limitations Under the Pretreatment program that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released in December 1987. This updated version provides POTW personnel with practical guidance for determining which pollutants are of most concern, how to collect and analyze data, designing and implementing local limits, as well as providing other practical assistance.

WWBKMG43DL/Book: 262 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule Turbidity Provisions Technical Guidance Manual
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This document provides information about the combined filter effluent and individual filter effluent requirements in the Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule ( LT1ESWTR). It also contains an overview of the turbidity requirements and other applicable rules.

DWBKOM77/Book: 254 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule: A Quick Reference Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This document serves as a simple reference for the Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule. It includes a brief overview of the rule with information concerning its purpose, major provisions, monitoring requirements, compliance deadlines, and public health information.

DWFSRG106DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Los ninos y los estandares del agua potable
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

People want to know that their children drink safe tap water. This EPA booklet explains how national standards contribute to drinking water safety and helps readers make informed choices about their drinking water. The booklet includes a list of contaminants, acceptable concentrations, their source, and contaminants' effects on children's health.

DWBLPE198DL/Fact Sheet: 10 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Low-Impact Development Design Strategies - An Integrated Design Approach
Prince George's County, Maryland, Department of Environmental Resources, Programs and Planning Division

Low-impact development (LID) is a radically different approach to conventional stormwater management. LID enhances the ability to protect surface and groundwater quality, maintain the integrity of aquatic living resources and ecosystems, and preserve the physical integrity of receiving streams. This book describes LID, including site planning, hydrology, distributed IMP technologies, erosion and sediment control, and public outreach.

DWBKMG179DL/Book: 150pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Low-Level Detections of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater: Use in Vulnerability Assessments
U.S. Geological Survey

This booklet investigates low-level detection of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater. The intent is for communities with groundwater as their drinking water source can use these techniques to perform vulnerability assessments.

DWBLMG160DL/Booklet: 20 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Low-Pressure Pipe Sewage System Installation and Design
Lincoln Trail District Health Department

Design and installation methods are crucial for obtaining proper low-pressure pipe (LPP) system performance. This manual is intended to be used as a voluntary reference for installers, inspectors, and users of LPP sewage disposal systems. The table, charts, figures, and instructions in this manual give detailed step-by-step procedures to use when designing LPP systems. This manual will be helpful to engineers, planners, managers, public health officials, operators, and contractors/developers.

WWBLDM101DL/Booklet: 49 pp. (0)

Price: $0.00


 
Low-Pressure Pipe Systems: A General Overview
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet provides an overview of low-pressure pipe systems and how they are used in onsite wastewater treatment.

WWFSGN107DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Low-Pressure Pipe Systems: A Technical Overview
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet is intended to help people who are weighing treatment options by giving a technical overview of low-pressure pipe (LPP) systems and how they are used in wastewater treatment. The fact sheet describes the basic components of an LPP system and how it works and provides information on performance factors such as soil requirements, space requirements, drainage and topography. An illustration of an LPP system is included, in addition to case studies and information on cost, advantages and disadvantages, and operation and maintenance.

WWFSOM29DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
LT1ESWTR Disinfection Profiling and Benchmarking Technical Guidance Manual
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This manual helps public water systems comply with the disinfection profiling and benchmarking requirements of the Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule. The manual explains when and why disinfection profiling and benchmarking are necessary, as well as how to compile and calculate these statistics in order to make better decisions about disinfection practices.

DWBKRG101DL/Book: 210 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
LT2ESWTR Data Collection and Tracking System Factsheet
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The EPA published the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2ESWTR) 1/2006 that requires the EPA, states, public water systems and labs to work together collecting source water monitoring data. This fact sheet explains how this ruling should be implemented and how these entities should use the Data Collection & Tracking System to manage data submissions.

DWFSMG118DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Mainstreaming Gender in Water Management–A Practical Journey to Sustainability: Resource Guide
United Nations Development Program (UNDP), Gender and Water Alliance (GWA)

This guide is a reference document to assist staff in mainstreaming gender within the context of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). It builds on existing initiatives by summarizing the available tools and materials on gender mainstreaming in IWRM. The resource guide is meant to:

• Improve the sustainability and effectiveness of water-related activities through incorporation of gender equality perspectives throughout the project cycle;

• Improve approaches to the planning, implementation, management and monitoring of IWRM; and

• Improve understanding and awareness of gender concepts through an easy reference to existing materials and tools.

The resource guide is not a set of guidelines, nor is it a step-by-step tool kit for gender mainstreaming. It is a reference guide that should be used in conjunction with the texts and materials to which it refers. It gives a brief overview and summary of issues within the different categories of IWRM and is designed to raise awareness and promote learning and analysis on the relevant social equity and gender issues. Each section may be reviewed on its own and used to raise awareness about its topic. The primary target groups for the resource guide are program managers, gender specialists and researchers within the field of IWRM.

DWBKMG198DL/Book: 88pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Maintaining Your Septic System—A Guide for Homeowners
National Environmental Services Center

This update to the Fall 1995 Pipeline focuses on educating homeowners about proper septic system operation and maintenance. Topics include groundwater pollution, system inspections, and the use of additives and cleaners. The newsletter includes a handy list of important septic system do's and don'ts.

SFPLNL39DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Maintaining Your Septic Tank
The University of Arizona, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cooperative Extension

It is important that the septic tank be properly maintained to work correctly. However, the best-designed and operated septic tank system eventually fails unless sludge is periodically removed from the septic tank. This brief fact sheet gives the owner an overview of maintenance procedures to safeguard the system. Tank maintenance, measuring sludge and scum accumulation, septic tank additives, and other additions to the tank are discussed. Procedures for measuring the accumulation of sludge and scum layers in a septic tank are illustrated, and a frequency table notes the estimated number of people in the household.

WWFSPE81DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00
Making a Difference for Rural and Small Utilities: Sustainable Rural and Small Utility Management Initiative
Making a Difference for Rural and Small Utilities: Sustainable Rural and Small Utility Management Initiative
U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Part of a partnership between the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, this guide, along with the Workshop in a Box: Sustainable Management of Rural and Small Systems Workshops, helps small and rural water and wastewater systems to better provide sustainable services to the communities they serve.

DWBLMG239DL/Booklet: 12pp.

Price: $0.00


 
Making Sense of "Right to Know" Reports
Campaign for Safe and Affordable Drinking Water

The Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996 were designed to enable the government and water suppliers to prepare for future drinking water safety challenges and assure the sustainable availability of safe drinking water. Among other objectives of the legislation, the amendments mandate that water companies provide their customers with better information by providing them with Right to Know Reports before the 1st of July each year. This fact sheet is a “frequently-asked-questions” (FAQ) report that explains the context, content, and importance of the reports and aids the consumer in better understanding the information.

DWFSPE322DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Man-made Chemicals in Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

This document describes how human-made chemicals can cause problems for private wells and drinking water. It also shows the potential source and how to test and treat the contamination in a private well.

DWFSPE298DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Management Programs Can Help Small Communities
National Environmental Services Center

The Spring 1996 Pipeline offers strategies for developing centralized programs for operating, maintaining, or monitoring decentralized systems. It explains how management programs give communities more control over their wastewater treatment. The newsletter includes tools and strategies for setting up and maintaining a management program and two examples of established management programs.

SFPLNL05DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00
 
Managing a Flooded Well
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

If you live in an area that was recently flooded, your private well may have been contaminated by flood water and you could be at risk of electrical shock from water-logged well equipment. This fact sheet gives homeowners important information about testing for contamination, disinfection procedures and safe ways to check the well and pump.

DWFSPE414DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Managing Biosolids in Small Communities
National Environmental Services Center

The Fall 1998 Pipeline presents a brief overview of small community options for managing biosolids. Articles explain how residual wastes from wastewater treatment processes (such as domestic septage and sewage sludge) are stabilized to produce biosolids. The newsletter discusses the safety and benefits of biosolids recycling and some of the requirements of the 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 503 standards. A list of contacts is provided.

SFPLNL15DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Managing for Excellence: Analysis of Water and Wastewater Utility Management Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wastewater Management

Effective utility management contributes to infrastructure sustainability by using management techniques which lead to reduced operating costs and improved performance. This booklet profiles eight leading utilities identified as industry leaders and details their exemplary management practices.

DWBKMG110DL/Book: 92 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Managing Holding Tanks
The Ohio State University

Some remote building sites have underlying soils that prevent the use of septic systems for onsite wastewater treatment. In these special cases, some states allow holding tanks to be used for the temporary storage of household waste. This fact sheet describes how to use holding tanks safely.

WWFSMG65DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Managing Septic Tank-Mound Systems
The Ohio State University

Septic tank-mound systems consist of three parts: a septic tank, a secondary dosing tank and the mound area. This fact sheet explains how this type of system works and gives siting tips and maintenance suggestions.

WWFSMG64DL/Fact Sheet: 5pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Managing Septic Tank-Sand Bioreactor Systems
The Ohio State University, Extension

This brief fact sheet illustrates and describes step-by-step the proper management of a septic tank-sand bioreactor filtration system. When a rural home is planned for an area with shallow or very permeable soils, or in an area with a high seasonal water table, special sand bioreactors can be used to provide the necessary wastewater treatment. A septic tank-sand bioreactor system is composed of four parts: the septic tank, a dosing tank, a sand bioreactor, and a disinfected system. Wastewater flows from the septic tank into the dosing tank, is then pumped into the sand bioreactor, and then disinfected before it can be discharged to a stream or dispersed on a lot through an irrigation system. Those wastewater professionals whose work involves alternatives to the conventional septic system may find this information useful.

WWFSMG18DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Managing Your Household Septic System
The University of Arizona, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cooperative Extension

It is important for onsite septic system owners to understand how septic systems work, how to maintain them, and precautions to take to decrease the potential for the septic system to contaminate groundwater or surface water. This brief fact sheet gives the owner an overview of management procedures to safeguard the system, including controlling the volume of wastewater sent to the tank, controlling the quality of the wastewater, maintaining the septic tank, and maintaining the drainfield.

WWFSPE77DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00


 
Manual for the Certification of Laboratories Analyzing Drinking Water; Criteria and Procedures Quality Assurance - Fifth Edition
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

Regional laboratories must undergo evaluations to maintain certification for testing for drinking water contaminants. This manual describes EPA's procedures and technical criteria for certifying regional laboratories, principal state laboratories in primacy states, and local laboratories in non-primacy states that perform drinking water analyses.

DWBKDM14DL/Book: 209 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Manual of Individual and Non-Public Water Supply Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Of the thousands of individual and small non-public water systems in the U.S., many don't have the technical and information resources to meet their customers' demands. This manual provides an overview of individual and non-public water systems and includes information about selecting and managing a water source, water treatment, pumping, distribution, and storage.

DWBKDM06DL/Book: 190 pp. (1991)

Price: $0.00


 
Manual of Small Public Water Supply Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Developing information sources, monitoring water quality, providing good system operation, and establishing preventive maintenance programs are essential to providing good quality public drinking water at low cost. This manual offers explanations of various drinking water processes, including technical aspects of public water supply, treatment, and distribution.

DWBKDM05DL/Book: 220 pp. (1991)

Price: $0.00
 
Manual of Water Well Construction Practices
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water Supply

Nearly 50 million Americans obtain their drinking water from individual home supply wells. This manual provides information about well construction techniques and discusses the intended use of the water, required capacity of the well, drilling methods, and construction costs.

DWBKDM01DL/Book: 170 pp. (1975)

Price: $0.00


 
Mapping Your Wellhead Protection Area
University of Maine , Cooperative Extension

If we know what may pollute our water supplies, we can take steps to prevent contamination.This fact sheet is for homeowners interested in protecting their wells from contamination.

DWFSPE370DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Matching Game: How Much Water?
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This game illustrates the amount of water that is needed to perform different tasks in a typical household.

DWFSPE237DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Mercury in Drinking Water
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Servics, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, Consumer and Environmental Health Services

What is mercury? How can mercury get into your drinking water? Is mercury harmful to your health? This booklet answers these questions and more. This handy booklet gives answers to consumers about this potentially harmful compound.

DWBLPE333DL/Fact Sheet: 16 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Methodology to Predict Nitrogen Loading from Conventional Gravity On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems
Washington State Department of Health, Office of Community Environmental Health Programs

Nitrogen transformations occur as wastewater undergoes onsite treatment. This booklet describes factors affecting nitrogen removal that can help designers and operators maximize performance. It also presents a method to estimate total nitrogen loading that uses soil characteristics and site descriptions found on typical permit applications, improving the accuracy of predicting groundwater impact.

WWBLRE14DL/Booklet: 21 pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00


 
Methods for Assessing Small Water System Capability: A Review of Current Techniques and Approaches
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This manual helps state officials understand and apply available methods for assessing water system capacity. It addresses small system capacity, provides examples of assessment methods, and explains system-level assessments for existing systems.

DWBLTR13DL/Booklet: 53 pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00
 
Methods for Comparing Wastewater Treatment Options
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project (NDWRCDP) Research Project

Many communities face decisions regarding centralized versus decentralized wastewater treatment and the various strategies available within the sectors. In this report, analytical tools and methos are evaluated that have the potential to capture the environmental penalty of such wastewater options in non-monetary units fo rU.S. communities. Methods are classified into environmental impact assessment, open wastewater planning, and life cycle assessment. The strengths and weaknesses of each nethod, as well as ways to streamline data needs while still reliably answering quesitons about wastewater treatment alternatives are described.

WWBKMG41DL/Book: 206 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Methods for the Determination of Organic and Inorganic Compounds in Drinking Water; Volume 1
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water & Drinking Water

Accurate and precise analytical measurements are essential to detemine the quality and character of drinking water. This volume provides seven methods for analyzing organic compounds and four methods for analyzing inorganic compounds in drinking water, many of which are already approved for drinking water compliance monitoring or for performing analysis required in the Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Regulation.

DWBKRE25DL/Book: 470 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Micro-Scale Evaluation of Phosphorus Management: Alternative Wastewater Systems Evaluation
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

Understanding and reducing sources of phosphorus pollution in the landscape includes evaluating and minimizing the phosphorus contribution from onsite systems to surface waters. Many phosphorus management methods have been developed and tested for use in decentralized wastewater treatment. This project gathered information about the application, performance, cost-effectiveness, and other factors associated with each method. Results from the project proved that nearly all methods require some form of long-term management program in order to successfully address phosphorus. This finding has important implications in managing phosphorus from decentralized wastewater treatment systems.

WWBKMG45DL/Book: 255pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Microbial and Disinfection Byproduct Rules Simultaneous Compliance Guidance Manual
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Microbial and Disinfection Byproduct Rules address acute threats from microbial contamination and chronic threats from disinfectant residuals and byproducts of disinfection. This manual describes the MDBP rules and potential conflicts that may arise as systems comply, plus it provides possible solutions and approaches to resolve these conflicts.

DWBKRG61DL/Book: 150 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Microbial Risk Assessment Tool
Montana Water Center

Operators and managers can learn to identify potential microbial risks in their water systems using this interactive product. Features include a tutorial in Microsoft Excel, a survey to inventory small system components and potential areas of contamination risk, and guidance materials and a ranking tool to complete the survey accurately and efficiently.

DWCDTR21DL/Zip File Download 205MB (2005)

Note that this file is large and we recommend downloading with broadband internet service. Also note that this product may not save your work if you have Windows 7 as your operating system. Using Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Mac OS X will allow you to document progress.

Price: $0.00


 
Microfiltration Treatment of Drinking Water Supplies
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Microfiltration is generally a low-cost safe treatment process that removes small amounts of suspended material from water. This pamphlet offers consumers advice on purchasing a water-treatment system.

DWFSPE306DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Minimizing Nitrogen Discharges from Onsite Wastewater Systems
National Environmental Services Center

Reducing the amount of nitrogen released from onsite wastewater systems has become a controversial issue in certain parts of the country. In some locales, property owners are being encouraged or even required to add nitrogen reducing systems to new and existing septic systems. This Pipeline explores why controlling nitrogen is an issue and how the units work. Before discussing how nitrogen treatment systems work, however, it is worth- while to cover some basic information about nitrogen.

SFPLNL55DL/Newsletter: 11 pp. (2012)

Price: $0.00

« | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10... | »


   
NESC Logo

The National Environmental Services Center (NESC)
(phone) 800-624-8301 (e-mail) info@mail.nesc.wvu.edu
(web) www.nesc.wvu.edu

© Copyright 2010, NESC All Rights Reserved.

Survey Software powered by SurveyMethods.com used for NESC Customer Questionnaire.