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Enhancing the Application of Integrated Water Resources Management in the ESCWA Region
United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (UNESCWA)

This report thus gives an overview of the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA) Region Training Manual and introduces the next phase of the program for national implementation. The ESCWA Region Training Manual follows the structure of the Global Water Partnership IWRM ToolBox, with regional adaptations from the ESCWA region by regional experts. It covers three main sections: 1. Water Governance (Policy, laws, institutions, stakeholders and capacity building) 2. Water Uses (Agriculture, water supply and sanitation and the environment) and 3. Water Management Tools (planning, analysis, groundwater, economics, paying for water, raising awareness, etc.). The second phase of the program is for implementation by national water agencies and their partner stakeholders working with the environment and agriculture.

DWBLMG204DL/Booklet: 42 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Environmental Education: Non-Point Source Pollution
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This classroom activity for children in grades 4-7 demonstrates what an average storm drain collects when it rain and how the water from storm drains can impact water quality and the aquatic environment of local streams, rivers, and bays.

DWFSPE270DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Environmental Education: Role of Plants in Water Filtration
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This experiment shows how a plume of dissolved materials can move through soil and enter a groundwater aquifer. Depending on whether materials are dissolved or suspended in the water, soils and plant roots can remove some or all of this material as the water moves down through the soil.

DWFSPE226DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Environmental Education: Water Purification by Evaporation and Condensation
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This activity demonstrates how the water cycle helps to purify water by using simple materials that can be assembled in the classroom.

DWFSPE225DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Environmental Indicators of Water Quality in the United States
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet shows trends in water quality over time. It describes our nation’s water resources and how human activities and natural events impact water quality. The booklet presents 18 indicators to measure progress toward water goals and objectives. These indicators are illustrated with graphs, charts, or maps and are categorized under one of five objectives:

• conserve and enhance public health;

• conserve and enhance aquatic ecosystems;

• support uses that states and tribes designate in their water quality standards;

• conserve and improve ambient conditions; and

• reduce or prevent pollutant loading and other stressors.

GNBLGN13DL/Booklet: 30pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00
 
Environmental Justice Resource Guide: A Handbook for Communities and Decision-Makers
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9

This guide provides environmental justice resources for community leaders in EPA Region 9 (California, Nevada, Arizona, Hawaii, and U.S. territories). Included in the guide are state-level contacts, tools and resources, and funding sources for communities who have been “disproportionately exposed to environmental harm and risk”.

DWBLGN90DL/Booklet: 20pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Environmental Management Resources for Indian Tribes
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Enforcement and Compliance

One of the USEPA’s directives is to prorect human health and the environment in Indian Country. This document serves as a reference for information about resources that specifically address tribal environmental issues. This document describes approximately 170 environmental resources including books, newsletters, fact sheets, databases, sources of financial assistance, training workshops and course material and assistance organizations. Entries are sorted by environmental categories, including air, water, waste, toxics, etc.

FMBKGN274DL/Book: 134pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Environmental Planning for Communities: A Guide to the Environmental Visioning Process Utilizing a Geographic Information System (GIS)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

As an essential step in community-based environmental protection, community leaders, residents, and planners develop an environmental vision of their preferred “green” community. One important tool to develop such a vision is the geographic information system (GIS) computer software. This book explains how communities can use GIS to produce maps, support scientific analysis, and depict environmental data in relation to the geography and capacity to model the landscape as it may evolve over time. The book provides introductory material for those unfamiliar with GIS and advanced material for more experienced GIS users.

GNBKMG13DL/Book: 58 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Environmental Planning for Small Communities: A Guide for Local Decision-Makers
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Developmnet

This guide presents ideas for developing a community environmental plan to protect both the residents and the environment. It addresses creating a planning team, determining needs, defining problems, reviewing regulations, developing strategies, and implementing the plan.

DWBKMG14DL/Book: 156 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00
 
Environmental Regulations and Technology: Control of Pathogens and Vector Attraction in Sewage Sludge
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

This book explains federal requirements for pathogens in sewage sludge applied to land or placed on a surface disposal site. Appendices provide information about determining volatile solids and residence time for digestion, sample methods for meeting pathogen reduction requirements, and a list of state and EPA regional sludge coordinators.

WWBKRG30DL/Book: 186 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Environmental Status and Trends in the Southeast 2000
Southeast Natural Resource Leaders Group

This report comes from the Southeast Natural Resource Leaders Group, composed of eight federal agencies–an informal alliance of senior federal executives who have chosen to respond to the regions new challenges collaboratively. The report presents some of today's environmental issues against a backdrop of current and past economic and societal trends. Also highlighted are some of the promising solutions emerging throughout the region. This report serves as the basis for future status update to the public by federal resource agencies.

GNBKGN221DL/Book: 79 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Environmental Technology Verification Report: Hach Company Water Distribution Monitoring Panel and the Event Monitor Trigger System
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Technology Verification

This technical document details the verification testing results for the Hach Water Distribution Monitoring Panel (WDMP) and Event Monitor Trigger System. The report will be of interest to those considering purchasing such equipment. The system monitors chlorine, pH, turbidity, conductivity, temperature, sample pressure, and TOC. A table summarizing the system's performance is included.

DWBKMG82DL/Book: 66 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
EPA 1996 Clean Water Needs Survey: Small Community Wastewater Needs
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet gives an overview of the Clean Water Needs Survey (CWNS). It discusses small community needs, treatment facilities in small communities, and the type of wastewater infrastructure needed in small communities. The CWNS defines ‘need’ as a cost estimate for a project eligible for funding under the State Revolving Fund (SRF) program in accordance with Title VI of the Clean Water Act (CWA). The estimates include costs associated with protecting public health or abating water quality problems. The booklet includes a state-by-state listing of documented needs and the estimated number of facilities needed within a state.

WWBLGN156DL/Fact Sheet: 6pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
EPA Guidelines for Management of Onsite/Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

How onsite and other decentralized wastewater treatment systems perform is a national issue of great concern. This U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) brochure discusses the guidelines for managing decentralized treatment systems. The brochure includes a detailed description of the guidelines, why they are needed, and it explains about their voluntary adoption. The brochure explains what the guidelines are, defines model management programs, and outlines the next steps for EPA. Wastewater professionals involved in following regulatory guidelines will be most interested in this information, but it is also useful and applicable to the general public.

WWFSMG19DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
EPA Safewater: Tap Into It!
U.S. Envrionmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water & Drinking Water

An important part of the 1996 Reauthorization of the Safe Drinking Water Act was to increase emphasis on public information, citizen involvement, and community partnerships. The EPA created this info packet to help people learn about national drinking water programs, the Safe Drinking Water Act, and more. Plus, it offers facts about U.S. water systems.

DWPKPE116DL/Package: 15 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
EPA's Healthy Watersheds Initiative
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

This factsheet encourages state and local governments, local organizations, and others to engage in watershed protection as a way to protect high-quality waters and prevent future impairments.

DWFSPE425DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
EPA's Interactive Sampling Guide for Drinking Water System Operators
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office Of Water

This download provides timely information about water sampling for system operators. Included is a sampling guide where several general sampling procedures are described, case studies covering a variety of different types of contamination from real small water systems, a 'rule wizard' that enables you to determine the federal monitoring requirements as they relate to your system's size, water source and treatment, and a listing of contaminants based on the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations. This list can also be printed.

DWCDTR26DL/Multiple zip file: 0 pp. (2006)

Note: This is a Windows Only download.

Price: $0.00
 
EPA's Interactive Sampling Guide for Drinking Water System Operators (Spanish)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This download provides timely information about water sampling for system operators. Included is a sampling guide where several general sampling procedures are described, case studies covering a variety of different types of contamination from real small water systems, a 'rule wizard' that enables you to determine the federal monitoring requirements as they relate to your system's size, water source and treatment, and a listing of contaminants based on the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations. This list can also be printed.

DWCDTR28DL/Multiple Zip Files 510.2 MB: 0 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
EPA's Role in Water Security Research
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water, Water Security Division

This booklet provides an overview of the work being done by the U.S. EPA to safeguard drinking water supplies, including research and technical support; vulnerability assessment and emergency response tools; and the Water Information Sharing and Analysis Center (Water ISAC), a comprehensive online resource of security information for water and wastewater utilities.

DWBKGN70DL/Booklet: 11pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
EPA'S Role in Water Security Research: The Water Security Research and Technical Support Action Plan
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

The U.S. EPA plays a critical role in homeland security. Much of the work over the past several decades in areas of emergency response, risk assessment, hazardous waste cleanup, drinking water and wastewater treatment, and water quality monitoring is being applied to water security. This booklet describes the EPA's work toward making U.S. drinking water supplies safe.

DWBLGN67DL/Booklet: 11 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
EPA's Voluntary Management Guidelines: Models 1, 2, and 3
National Environmental Services Center

In response to concerns about the performance of onsite wastewater treatment systems EPA recently published a set of management models designed to help state, tribal, and local authorities meet water quality standards. This issue of Pipeline interprets the three models into simple terms. A case study about a county in Virginia that are putting parts of these models into use is included.

SFPLNL44DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
EPA's Voluntary Management Guidelines: Models 4 and 5
National Environmental Services Center

In response to concerns about the performance of onsite wastewater treatment systems EPA recently published a set of management models designed to help state, tribal, and local authorities meet water quality standards. This issue of Pipeline provides a detailed look at Models 4 and 5 and includes a case study where elements of these models are put into practice.

SFPLNL45DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
EPA's Voluntary Management Guidelines—An Overview
National Environmental Services Center

In response to concerns about the performance of onsite wastewater treatment systems EPA recently published a set of management models designed to help state, tribal, and local authorities meet water quality standards. This issue of Pipeline interprets these voluntary guidelines into simple terms. The guidelines are also presented in a two-page chart format for further clarity.

SFPLNL43DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
EPA’s Study on the Potential Impact of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This paper discusses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) plan to conduct a study about the effects of hydraulic fracking on drinking water. While natural gas plays a key role in our nation’s clean energy future, there are questions about process of hydraulic fracturing, such as what is the impact on groundwater and surface water quality, and does it affect human health and the environment? This study will address these questions and others including chemical mixing, well injection, and wastewater treatment and disposal.

DWFSMG206DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2012)

Price: $0.00


 
Estableciendo estandarews para agua potable segura
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

EPA sets standards that, when combined with protecting groundwater and surface water, are critical to ensuring safe drinking water. This booklet describes what the standards are, how they protect public health, and how the standards are established.

DWBLPE194DL/Fact Sheet: 7 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Estandares del Reglamento Nacional Primario de Agua Potable (National Primary Drinking Water Standards) (Spanish)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This factsheet describes the National Primary Drinking Water Standards along with the maximum contamination level goal (MCLG) and the maximum contamination level (MCL). Possible health effects due to exposure higher than the MCL for each contaminant and the common contamination sources for each is included.

DWBLPE197DL/Fact Sheet: 5 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Estimating the Likelihood of MTBE Occurrence in Drinking Water Supplied by Ground-Water Sources in the Northeaset and Mid-Atlantic Regions of the United States
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey

Compounds that contain oxygen, or oxygenates, are added to gasoline to enhance performance. Methyl tert-butyl ether -MTBE- is most commonly used and has been frequently detected in surface and groundwater. This study examines the chances of MTBE's presence in groundwater, estimates the probability that a municipal or private-supply well will be contaminated, and estimates the number of wells with MTBE at or above concentrations of regulatory concern.

DWBLRE24DL/Booklet: 16 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Estimating Water Use and Savings in Your Home
Penn State University, College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

This fact sheet helps determine how much water we use in our homes. Simple calculations show how more efficient appliances and water-conserving devices will save water as well as money.

DWBLPE300DL/Booklet: 6pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Evaluating Customer Response to Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Options
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This manual presents the results of a study conducted in 2000 designed to help the National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project (NDWRCDP) gauge user attitudes and preferences toward distributed wastewater treatment systems and management options. The study’s objectives include the following:

· Identify customer attitudes regarding water quality and the adequacy of their current septic systems, alternative wastewater solutions, and who has primary responsibility for wastewater issues.

· Identify the contextual factors affecting customer attitudes and preferences related to water quality and wastewater issues.

· Identify tradeoffs customers make between septic systems and connecting to sewer systems and their willingness to pay for third-party septic system management.

· Identify how different types of customers would make decisions about wastewater solutions differently.

Data from The Septic System Survey 2000, conducted by North Carolina State University, was analyzed to help address the research objectives.

Despite the lack of market penetration achieved by advanced wastewater treatment technologies and the current uncertainty regarding future adoption of these systems and of management and maintenance services, the survey analysis indicates there are future opportunities for decentralized wastewater treatment technologies and related services.

The study also identifies opportunities for future NDWRCDP research. This product will be of interest to public health officials, local officials, planners, researchers, state officials, and the state regulatory agencies

WWBKMG22DL/Book: 72pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Evaluating Proposed Stormwater Infiltration Projects in Vulnerable Wellhead Protection Areas
State of Minnesota , Department of Health

Infiltration practices redirect storm water into the subsurface where it becomes ground water. Ground water often is a source of drinking water, so it is wise to plan storm water infiltration projects carefully, especially in vulnerable wellhead protection areas. This booklet describes suggested considerations for evaluating these infiltration projects.

DWBLMG123DL/Booklet: 11 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Evaluation of Chemical and Biological Indicators for Source Apportionment of Phosphorus in Table Rock Lake, on the Missouri-Arkansas Border
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This project evaluated chemical and biological species as potential indicators of specific phosphorus source types. A GIS-based multi-criteria decision analysis was used to guide selection of sampling locations in Table Rock Lake for capturing the influence of discharges from wastewater treatment plants, septic systems, and runoff from animal feeding operations. Results from the project, as well as chemical species evaluated, are included in this report.

WWBKRE56DL/Book: 159pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Evaluation of Several Field Test Kits for Determining Concentrations of Arsenic in Drinking Water
Penn State Harrisburg, Small Public Water Systems Technology Assistance Center

Arsenic has been linked to cancer of the bladder, lungs, skin, kidney and liver. It enters drinking water supplies from natural deposits in the earth or from farming or industry. As of January 2006, EPA regulations require drinking water arsenic levels not exceed 10 parts-per-billion. This fact sheet evaluates seven commercially-available field test kits for reliability, accuracy and ease of use.

DWFSMG145DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Evapotranspiration Systems
National Environmental Services Center

The Winter 2000 Pipeline focuses on two versions of evapotranspiration systems:

• the lined system that disposes of wastewater without permitting effluent to move into the soil, and

• the evapotranspiration/absorption system that is constructed without a liner to permit a very slow rate of seepage into the ground.

This newsletter describes how the systems are designed, how they treat wastewater effluent, and what climate and soil situations warrant their use. Advantages and disadvantages are included.

SFPLNL20DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Evapotranspiration Systems
National Environmental Services Center

Evapotranspiration systems (ET) and evapotranspiration absorption systems (ETA) are an upcoming and novel solution to some difficult onsite wastewater treatment needs. The drawbacks to ET/ETA systems are they can not be used everywhere, relying as they do on sufficient sunlight. This overview highlights general design considerations, operation and maintenance guidelines, and cost estimates for ET/ETA systems.

SFBLTO06DL/Booklet: 8pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Evapotranspiration Systems: A General Overview
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet provides an overview of evapotranspiration systems and how they are used in onsite wastewater treatment.

WWFSGN110DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Evapotranspiration Systems: A Technical Overview
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet is intended to help people who are weighing treatment options by giving a technical overview of evapotranspiration (ET) systems and how they are used in onsite wastewater treatment. The fact sheet defines evapotranspiration and discusses the conditions that must be met in order for and ET system to be effective. The three main types of ET systems (evapotranspiration, evapotranspiration/absorption (ETA), and mechanical) are described. A cross-sectional view of a typical ET bed is illustrated, and information is provided on performance factors, such as the rate of evaporation versus precipitation, hydraulic loading, sand capillary rise characteristics, and cover soil and vegetation. In addition, the fact sheet includes case studies and information on cost, advantages and disadvantages, and operation and maintenance.

WWFSOM32DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Every Drop Counts
State of Georgia, Office of Environmental Management, Department of Community Affairs

Clean water is a precious resource and growing demand is squeezing our water resources dry. This brochure helps us to pay more attention to how we are using water and how we may be wasting it. 'Watching Water Wasters' lists suggestions like checking for leaking toilets or taking shorter showers or stalling water-efficient appliances. Many water reuse ideas are included. Ideas for taking your water conservation efforts out into the community are described. A handy pocket-sized card listing the most effective water saving tips comes along with this pamphlet.

DWBRGN76DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00
 
Expanding Communication in Communities Addressing Wastewater Needs
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

The Green Mountain Institute for Environmental Democracy (GMI) completed a one-year project to improve the availability of information and tools for communities working toward a solution for their wastewater needs. The goals of the project were to help interested community members build motivation of others to participate in the project and to help build a project structure that identifies and describes the public process components necessary to move their project from planning to action. This document discusses the materials of the project and pilot tests the material in four communities. Each case study is presented in detail along with outcomes and recommendations.

WWCDMG48DL/Multiple Files: 53pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Explaining the Activated Sludge Process
National Environmental Services Center

This issue of Pipeline explains the activated sludge process and discusses the three most common variations: extended aeration, sequencing batch readers, and oxidation ditches. A chart for advantages and disadvantages for each variation is provided, as well as a checklist for safety considerations and problem/effect table.

SFPLNL33DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Extension Extra: Drinking Water Standards—Health Advisory Levels
South Dakota State University, Cooperative Extension Service

Drinking water with contaminant levels above acceptable health standards may cause adverse health effects over time. For this reason, EPA has established health advisory levels to help state and local officials in determining levels of chemical concentrations that are acceptable in drinking water. This guide provides a list of contaminants, as well as related health effects and advisory levels established by EPA as of August 1994.

DWFSPE203DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Extension Extra: Secondary Drinking Water Standards
South Dakota State University, Russ Derickson

Secondary drinking water standards are not enforced; however, they are intended to help reduce nuisance contaminants that may effect taste, odor, or color, as well as cause scale deposits, stained plumbing, and corrosion. This fact sheet lists contaminants that may cause secondary effects, including some minor health effects, and provides recommended secondary maximum contaminant levels best suited for avoiding these problems.

DWFSRG102DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Extension Extra: Water for Emergency Use
South Dakota State University, Cooperative Extension Service

When a storm or other natural disaster strikes, access to water, food, and electricity may end for days or even weeks. Having enough clean drinking water in storage can make life a lot easier in an emergency. This publication explains how to safely store water and how to make impure water safe to drink in an emergency situation.

DWFSPE204DL/Fact Sheet: 3pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00


 
Fact Sheet On Home Drinking Water Treatment
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region IX

This fact sheet explains the most common types of home water treatment units and their capabilities. Technologies, such as filters, softeners, activated carbon filtration, reverse osmosis, and UV disinfection, are discussed.

DWBLPE96DL/Fact Sheet: 8 pp. (1988)

Price: $0.00
 
Fact Sheet: Class V Injection Wells Proposed Regulatory Requirements as Part of a Comprehensive Management Strategy for Class V Injection Wells
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Underground injection control (UIC) Class V wells are typically shallow disposal systems that place a variety of waste waters below the land surface. Injection wells are regulated by EPA and states through the UIC program to protect underground sources of drinking water from contamination. This fact sheet discusses why Class V injection wells are of concern to EPA, how they are regulated, and the proposed regulatory requirements.

WWFSRG65DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Fact Sheet: Final Aircraft Drinking Water Rule
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet provides information about the Aircraft Drinking Water Rule, designed to ensure safe drinking water for aircraft passengers and crew.

DWFSRG133DL/Fact Sheet: 8 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
Fact Sheet: Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The disinfection of drinking water was one of the major public health advances in the 20th century. However, the disinfectants themselves may pose health risks. This fact sheet provides the latest information about the public health risks of drinking water disinfection in a friendly question-and-answer format. Sources for more information are also included.

DWFSRG113DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Fact Sheet: Water Conservation Measures
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet explains various methods of water conservation, such as metering, accounting for water consumed, and detecting and repairing leaks in the distribution system. It also stresses that information and education help people understand the importance of water conservation.

DWBLPE74DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Factors Affecting Public-Supply-Well Vulnerability to Contamination: Understanding Observed Water Quality and Anticipating Future Water Quality
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey

This U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program report details a study that was conducted from 2001 through 2011 to shed light on factors that affect the vulnerability of water from public-supply wells to contamination. NAWQA’s study of public-supply-well vulnerability to contamination found that it is possible to understand—as well as anticipate—the quality of water from a public-supply well by knowing what factors to evaluate and how?to go about evaluating them. Study findings can be applied by drinking-water practitioners not only?to devise improved programs for monitoring public-supply wells and the aquifers they tap but also to identify the most beneficial protection mechanisms for a particular well. Ultimately, the findings of this study can be used to update and enhance existing assessments of public-supply-well vulnerability across the nation and to design strategies for preventing future contamination of such wells—thus helping to sustain the nation’s water supply.

DWBKMG215DL/Book: 132 pp. (2013)

Price: $0.00


 
Facts About... Well Protection in Flood Prone Areas
Maryland Department of the Environment, Water Management Administration

This fact sheet is intended to supplement flood precautions issued by the local health departments. Recommended actions for homeowners in case their well is flooded is presented. Contact information for agencies that can help with sampling and testing the well water is included.

DWFSPE316DL/Fact Sheet: 3 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Feasibility of an Economically Sustainable Point-of-Use/Point of-Entry Decentralized Public Water System
NSF International

This document discusses the feasibility and economic sustainability of using a point-of-use/point-of-entry treatment system for public water systems. Small systems often do not have the financial means to keep up with many regulations. This document discusses how small systems can comply with these regulations and reliably reduce contaminants.

DWBKMG166DL/Book: 79 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Features of an Active and Effective Protective Program for Water and Wastewater Utilities
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet describes various features that a water or wastewater utility should undertake to make their system secure and resilient.

DWBLMG161DL/Booklet: 17 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Federal Funding Sources for Small Community Wastewater Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet highlights 10 federal programs that help state, tribal, and local officials identify possible funding sources. Information about who to contact and how to apply is included. While this publication describes some drinking water programs, it focuses mainly on wastewater.

FMBLFN29DL/Booklet: 34pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00


 
Field Demonstration of Innovative Condition Assessment Technologies for Water Mains: Leak Detection
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

This report presents the results from three leak detection technologies: Pressure Pipe Inspection Company’s (PPIC’s) Sahara®, Pure’s SmartBallTM, and Echologics’ LeakfinderRT. Simulated leaks using calibrated orifices in combination with natural leaks that already existed in the test pipe were used to evaluate the performance of each leak detection system. The natural leaks were used to assess detection and location capabilities, while the calibrated orifices were used to evaluate the leak rate assessment capabilities for each technology. The combination of natural leaks and simulated leaks provided an assessment of the capability of each leak detection system to detect, locate, and prioritize leak rates. Each company provided a written report on the location and general size of natural leaks detected in the test pipe, as well as leak rate estimates for the simulated leaks. Additional results from the acoustic pipe wall assessment, internal inspection and external inspection technologies will also be made available in a companion report.

DWBKMG212DL/Book: 184 pp. (2012)

Price: $0.00
 
Filter Backwash Recycling Rule: A Quick Reference Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Drinking water plants must periodically clean their filters to remove particles that accumulate. Many systems recycle spent filter backwash water back into the treatment plants. This recycling, when performed improperly, may increase the risk of waterborne pathogens entering treated water. This fact sheet outlines the Filter Backwash Recycling Rule (FBRR), its requirements and deadlines, and lists the public health benefits.

DWFSRG68DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Filter Backwash Recycling Rule: A Summary for Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Filter Backwash Recycling Rule (FBRR) is aimed at reducing the opportunity for recycled contaminants to adversely affect the performance of drinking water treatment plants. Without this rule, treatment plants are at a greater risk of allowing contaminants, such as Cryptosporidium, to pass through the treatment system and into finished drinking water. This document outlines and explains the three basic FBRR requirements–reporting, selecting recycle return locations, and recordkeeping.

DWBLRG100DL/Booklet: 10 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Final Drinking Water Public Notification Regulations
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency , Office of Water

Public notification ensures that consumers will always know if there is a problem with their drinking water. This fact sheet explains the rule and includes a table of violations and situations requiring notification. It also includes a sample outlining the required elements of a public notice.

DWFSRG62DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Final Ground Water Rule
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Ground Water Rule (GWR) establishes multiple barriers to protect against bacteria and viruses in drinking water from groundwater sources and establishes a strategy to identify groundwater systems at high risk for fecal contamination. This fact sheet explains the GWR’s requirements for sanitary surveys, hydrogeologic sensitivity assessments, source water monitoring, corrective actions, and compliance monitoring.

DWFSRG59DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Financial Management Handbook for Small Community Water Systems
Midwest Assistance Program, Inc.

No community water system wants to raise rates, but the goal of every system is to provide safe, fairly-priced water while operating at breakeven or better financially. This booklet provides clear guidance on the procedure for developing appropriate water rates. Topics discussed included are how to determine when to examine a system's rate structure, when to increase rates, what to do with customer water usage information, and how to set the base rate structure. This document was prepared by Midwest Assistance Program.

DWBKMG78DL/Book: 60 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Financing Models for Environmental Protection: Helping Communities Meet Their Environmental Goals
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Administration and Resources Management

Illustrating the successes of EPA's Public-Private Partnerships (P3) Demonstration Program, this book provides an array of financing models that can serve as prototypes for local governments planning and implementing environmental programs. The book offers case studies about how these models are used for individual projects. The book includes contacts from EPA's P3 demonstration projects and other sources to guide communities in meeting their environmental needs. It shares lessons learned by local governments who implemented these models.

FMBKFN18DL/Book: 99 pp. (1992)

Price: $0.00
 
Fine Bubble Aeration: A General Overview
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet provides an overview of fine bubble aeration and how it is used in onsite wastewater treatment.

WWFSGN101DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Fine Bubble Aeration: A Technical Overview
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet is intended to help people who are weighing treatment options by giving a technical overview of how fine bubble aeration is used in wastewater treatment. It describes the aeration process, the main types of fine bubble diffusers, design information, and performance characteristics. Included are illustrations of a membrane disc diffuser, dome diffuser, and tube diffuser. Also provided are case studies and information on advantages and disadvantages, operation and maintenance requirements, and cost.

WWFSOM23DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Fine Pore Aeration Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Center for Environmental Research Information, Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory

This manual discusses fine pore aeration devices, including porous ceramic plates, discs, domes, and tubes; rigid plastic tubes; and perforated membrane tubes and discs. The manual presents current practices for selecting, designing, operating, maintaining, and controlling fine pore aeration systems. Other topics include fine pore diffuser characteristics, process performance, cost analysis, and case histories of operating systems.

WWBKDM47DL/Book: 328pp. (1989)

Price: $0.00


 
First Aid for a Flooded Septic System
National Environmental Services Center

This issue of Pipeline provides recommendations for homeowners for keeping their septic system functioning before, during and after flooding situations.

SFPLNL46DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Fixing On-site Sewage Systems Restores Popular New Orleans Area Rivers
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

High bacteria counts in the Tchefuncte River and its tributary, the Bogue Falaya River, prompted the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) to add a segment of each water body to Louisiana’s 1992 Clean Water Act (CWA) section 303(d) list of impaired waters. LDEQ and the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation (LPBF) formed partnerships with St. Tammany Parish and surrounding communities to implement education and corrective programs. Bacteria counts decreased, and LDEQ removed both segments from the 2008 CWA section 303(d) list of impaired waters for fecal coliform.

WWFSMG79DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


Flood Resilience: A Basic Guide for Water and Wastewater Utilities
Flood Resilience: A Basic Guide for Water and Wastewater Utilities
U.S. Environmetnal Protection Agency, Office of Water

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed this guide to help drinking water and wastewater utilities become more resilient to flooding. In the approach, the utility would examine the threat of flooding, determine impacts to utility assets and identify cost-effective mitigation options. This approach was successfully tested during a pilot project at a small drinking water system, the Berwick Water Department (BWD), in Berwick, Maine. This guide is particularly useful for small and medium utilities. It provides easy-to-use worksheets with corresponding videos (based on the Berwick pilot).

DWBLMG222DL/Booklet: 47 pp. (2014)

Price: $0.00
 
Fluoride in Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Fluoride, in the right amount, promotes the development of strong teeth and is beneficial for children under age 12. But, too much fluoride can be detrimental. This fact sheet explains on how to interpret water test results for fluoride levels in private water supplies and also suggests some corrective actions.

DWFSPE303DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Folleto informative de technologia de aguas residuales: Extration de amoniaco por arrastre ocn aire
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet describes the process of ammonia stripping. The process is a simple desorption procedure that lowers the content of ammonia in a wastewater stream. This fact sheeet discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the procedure, basic design, and operation and maintenance criteria.

WWFSGN227DL/Fact Sheet: 5 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Formulate Great Rates: The Guide to Conducting a Rate Study for a Water System
Rural Community Assistance Partnership, Inc., Rural Community Assistance Partnership, Inc.

As a board member or officer of your community’s water system, you have a responsibility to your community to deliver clean, safe drinking water at a fair price. This RCAP guide looks at the various components involved in setting rates for water and wastewater systems.

DWBKFN48DL/Booklet: 40pp. (2011)

Price: $0.00


 
Frequently Asked CCR Questions
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Have questions about your system's consumer confidence report? Don't worry; you're not alone. This report answers several of those that are commonly asked.

DWBLPE199DL/Booklet: 6 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
Frequently Asked Questions About Boil Orders
Frequently Asked Questions About Boil Orders
State of New Hampshire, Department of Environmental Services

This factsheet provides guidance to consumers of a public water system under a boil water order. It answer questions such as why must I boil my water? And can I use bottled water?

DWFSPE447DL/Fact Sheet: 3 pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00


 
Frequently Asked Questions About Bottled Water
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Each year consumers spend about $4 billion on bottled water. Their reasons run the gamut from convenience to avoiding a contamination problem. This fact sheet answers questions about regulations for suppliers, types, safety, and lists sources for more information.

DWFSPE249DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Frequently Asked Technical Questions
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

This fact sheet answers some of the most common questions from well-owners about typical well problems. This knowledge can help you when discussing the problem with a well contractor or pump installer when you when you contact them for help or repair.

DWFSPE413DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
From Problems to Solutions: Planning and Management of Onsite Wastewater Systems
National Association of Counties

A septic system (which is the most common type of onsite decentralized wastewater treatment system) is a self contained, underground wastewater treatment system. This booklet describes how to plan and manage to avoid problems and offers solutions for when problems do arise.

WWBLMG74DL/Booklet: 16pp.

Price: $0.00
 
Funding Decentralized Wastewater Systems Using the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) is a low-interest or no-interest source of funding for the installation, repair or upgrade of decentralized wastewater systems in rural or suburban areas. The pamphlet describes how these funds work and how to obtain these funds for your town.

WWFSFN47DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Funding Decentralized Wastewater Systems Using the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) is a low-interest or no-interest funding source for installing, repairing, and upgrading decentralized wastewater systems in small-town, rural, and suburban areas. This fact sheet discusses how the CWSRF operates, including eligible projects and who may qualify. Success stories from Ohio, Maine, Pennsylvania, and Minnesota describe how these states have used the CWSRF. Other funding sources for decentralized systems are summarized, including EPA 319 Grants, USDA Rural Utilities Service, Housing and Urban Development Community Development Block Grant, and non-federal assistance.

WWFSFN07DL/Fact Sheet: 6pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Funding Nonpoint Source Activities with the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) programs have funded more than $40 billion in low interest loans through 2003‚ —averaging $4.1 billion over the past five years—for water quality protection projects including wastewater treatment, nonpoint source pollution control, and watershed and estuary management. This booklet discusses the CWSRF and how it has improved water quality across the nation.

WWBLFN48DL/Booklet: 24pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Funding of Small Community Needs Through the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet outlines the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (SRF) program, authorized by Title VI of the Clean Water Act (CWA) Amendments of 1987. Funding trends, including distribution of SRF dollars to small communities relative to total SRF funding from 1988-1998 are discussed. One figure illustrates the relationship between SRF agreements with small communities and total SRF agreements, while another figure shows the documented needs of small communities from the Clean Water Needs survey. A table contains CWSRF assistance in dollars and the number of agreements by community-size for fiscal years 1988-1998 for each state.

FMFSFN33DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Funding Sources Are Available for Wastewater Projects
National Environmental Services Center

The Fall 1999 Pipeline highlights funding sources for homeowners or small communities wanting to install or repair onsite wastewater treatment systems. It outlines commonly used sources of funding from the EPA and other federal agencies, as well as less-known avenues of funding, such as regional programs and nonprofit organizations. A case study summarizes how one small community secured funding for its wastewater treatment project.

SFPLNL19DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Funding Water Conservation and Reuse with the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet discusses the Clean Water Act of 1987, which authorized the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) to finance point source, nonpoint source, and estuary projects. The programs work like banks, using federal and state contributions to capitalize or set up the programs. These assets, in turn are used to make low- or no-interest loans. Repaid funds are recycled to pay for other water quality projects. This fact sheet describes how the CWSRF works, how to fund a project, and the sources of loan repayments. Examples of successful projects are summarized.

FMFSFN35DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Future Investment in Drinking Water and Wastewater Infrastructure
The Congress of the United States, Congressional Budget Office

According to experts from the EPA and various nonfederal groups, the nation's drinking water and wastewater systems face increasing challenges over the next several decades in maintaining and replacing their pipes, treatment plants, and other infrastructure. But there is neither consensus on the size and timing of future investment costs nor agreement on the impact of those costs on households and other water ratepayers. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has analyzed those issues, and this study provides:

· background information on the nation's water systems,

· CBO's estimates of future costs for water infrastructure under two scenarios (a low-cost case and a high-cost case), and

· broad policy options for the federal government.

Keeping in mind the CBO's mandate to provide objective and impartial analysis, this report makes no recommendations. Three chapters in this study discuss drinking water and wastewater infrastructure, estimates of future investment costs and their implications, and options for federal policy. The appendices include information about the assumptions the CBO used in it low-cost and high-cost cases and major sources of efficiency savings. Figures and summary tables throughout the report illustrate statistical analyses.

FMBKFN40DL/Book: 75pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
GAO Report: Securing Wastewater Facilities--Utilities Have Made Important Upgrades but Further Improvements to Key System Components May Be Limited by Costs and Other Constraints
U.S. Government Acountability Office

Wastewater facilities provide essential services to residential, commercial and industrial users yet they possess characteristics that terrorists could exploit and federal law doesn't address wastewater security as comprehensively as it does drinking water security. In 2005, the U.S. Government Accountablity Office was asked to determine what federal directives govern the protection of these facilities and what steps some of the larger treatment plants have taken since 9/11 to address their vulnerabilities. This report presents the findings of this study.

WWBKGN277DL/Book: 68 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
GAO Report: Water Pollution Information on the Use of Alternative Wastewater Treatment Systems
U. S. General Accounting Office (GAO)

In June 1992, members of Congress requested information as to whether the nation could reduce its wastewater treatment costs by using new or unconventional methods. This report discusses cost-effective alternatives to conventional systems, what barriers may be limiting the use of these alternatives, and how EPA is addressing the development of future technologies.

WWBLGN55DL/Booklet: 52pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00


 
General Design, Construction and Operation Guidelines:: Constructed Wetlands Wastewater Treatment Systems for Small Users Including Individual Residences, Second Edition
Tennessee Valley Authority

This manual provides guidelines to assist an engineer in designing a small constructed wetland for flows up to 10,000 gallons per day. The manual details pretreatment, hydraulic and organic loading, design, construction, vegetation, and operation and maintenance. Design examples are included for residential or other small constructed wetland systems with septic tank primary treatment.

WWBLDM65DL/Booklet: 38 pp. (1993)

Price: $0.00
 
General Goals and Requirements of Wellhead Protection Q&A
Minnesota Department of Health, Drinking Water Protection Section, Source Water Protection Unit

This fact sheet offers answers to some of the most common questions that communities might have about wellhead protection.

DWFSOM130DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00


 
Georgia Water Series Issue 3: Evaluating Water System Financial Performance and Financing Options
University of Georgia, Dept of Agricultural & Applied Economics

National compliance costs for new drinking water regulations are a severe test of the financial health of community water systems. Once a utility has a system for tracking financial health it can more adequately begin to examine how to finance capital projects. This booklet, produced by the University of Georgia's Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, offers sound expertise on how to measure a water utility's financial performance.

DWBLFN43DL/Booklet: 24 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Georgia Water Series, Issue 5: Rate Design for Small Systems
University of Georgia, Department of Agricultural & Applied Economics

This booklet offers the premise that in order to set rates to fund a water utility, an easy three step process can be employed. The three steps (identify costs, establish the classes of service and design the rate structure) are fully described within this publication.

DWBLMG89DL/Booklet: 13 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Geospatial Technology and Source Water Protection Measures for Small Public Water Systems
Mississippi State University, Southeast Regional Small Drinking Water Systems Technical Assistance Center

Various surface geology conditions and soil associations can be potentially hazardous to small water system wells and their wellhead protection areas. By using geographic information systems (GIS) layers, it is possible to determine these potential hazards. This report summarizes such a study in a small area of the state of Mississippi and details the GIS data layers that were obtained, the agency that crated the layers, and the ways in which the layers were analyzed.

DWBLOM115DL/Booklet: 20 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Getting In Step - A Guide to Effective Outreach in Your Watershed
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Watershed Academy Web

By becoming more aware of how our everyday actions affect our nation's streams and rivers, it is possible to develop strategies that will enable communities to protect and restore the quality of their waterways. The purpose of this guide is to provide a comprehensive coverage of the tools needed to develop and implement an effective outreach campaign as part of a state or local water quality improvement initiative.

DWBLMG58DL/Booklet: 49 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Getting in Step : Engaging and Involving Stakeholders in Your Watershed
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Effective stakeholder involvement provides a method for identifying public concerns and values, developing consensus among affected parties, and producing effective and efficient solutions through an open, inclusive process. This guide provides the tools needed to effectively engage stakeholders to restore and maintain healthy environmental conditions through community support and cooperative action. Tips for working effectively with stakeholders in protecting water quality are also included, as well as resource information, case studies, Web sites, and other how-to guides related to watershed protection.

WWBKPE106DL/Book: 80pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
Getting in Step: A Guide for Conducting Watershed Outreach Campaigns
Getting in Step: A Guide for Conducting Watershed Outreach Campaigns
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Watershed protection involves the awareness and participation of the entire watershed. This manual and video set guides local officials, public health managers, community residents, and other interested individuals and groups through six steps to conducting successful watershed outreach campaigns. It provides advice and tools to developing an affective campaign.

GNPKPE90DL/Package: 136 pp. (0)

*** For video downloading and viewing instructions, please use this link

Price: $0.00


 
Getting up to Speed: The Water Cycle and Water Conservation
U.S. Environmental Protection agency, Office of Ground Water & Drinking Water

This teachers guide contains a series of lessons and activities for secondary students. Topics include groundwater resources and protection, water distribution systems, groundwater contamination, and wellhead protection programs.

DWBKPE216DL/Book: 70 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00
 
Giardia Infection: Giardiasis
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; National Center for Infectious Diseases , Division of Parasitic Diseases

Contaminated water can lead to several illnesses.This fact sheet discusses giardiasis, an illness caused by the microscopic Giardia parasite that lives in the intestine of humans and animals.

DWFSPE172DL/Fact Sheet: 5 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Giardia: Drinking Water Fact Sheet
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Giardia, an infectious, intestinal parasite, is distributed worldwide in lakes, ponds, rivers, and streams. Municipal wastewater probably always contain Giardia cysts. This fact sheet discusses Giardia in the environment, its human health effects and treatment, who is at risk, prevention through water treatment, and who to contact if contamination is suspected.

DWFSPE213DL/Fact Sheet: 5 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Giardiasis (Spanish)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Infectious Diseases Division of Parsitic Diseases

Contaminated water can lead to several illnesses.This Spanish-language fact sheet discusses giardiasis, an illness caused by the microscopic Giardia parasite that lives in the intestine of humans and animals.

DWFSPE171DL/Booklet: 5 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Give Water A Hand Action Guide
U.S. Department of Agriculture Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service

Helping young people learn about water supplies and conservation is one of the best ways to ensure healthy communities. This two-book set offers students fun activities and tips that get them started thinking about protecting water resources.

DWPKPE49DL/Book: 72 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00
 
Good Water Habits: What You Need to Know
National Groundwater Association

Whether you use well water or a public drinking water supply, you can take measures to make sure yur water is safe. This fact sheet answers several questions about about water contaminants and suggests things to do at home to keep your water safe.

DWFSPE261DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Gravelless and Chamber Systems: Alternative Drainfield Designs
National Environmental Services Center

The Summer 2001 Pipeline presents an overview of gravelless and contour drainfield systems for onsite wastewater treatment and dispersal. The newsletter compares the two technologies with conventional drainfields. It also discusses operation and maintenance and advantages and disadvantages. The newsletter includes a case study about a chamber system used in a West Virginia School.

SFPLNL26DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Graywater: Safe Reuse and Recycling
National Environmental Services Center

The Winter 2002 Pipeline discusses the state of graywater use in the U.S. Graywater is generally defined as all wastewater generated from household activities except that produced from the toilet and kitchen sink. As clean water resources become more scarce, the concept of separating out the graywater from a home's waste stream and using it to supplement the family's water demand is becoming increasingly appealing. The newsletter evaluates the safety and legality of graywater use.

SFPLNL28DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Green Infrastructure Approaches to Managing Wet Weather with Clean Water State Revolving Funds
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet provides information about managing stormwater with green infrastructure approaches and funding from the clean water state revolving loan program.

DWFSFN47DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Greywater Systems
National Environmental Services Center

Greywater contains solids, bacterial contamination, and harmful pathogens and thus must be treated. However, it has many beneficial reuse potentials. This overview discusses some of the options available to treat greywater and reuse the effluent for activities such as flushing toilets or watering lawns.

SFBLTO05DL/Booklet: 8pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00

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