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Moving Our Inventory to Better Serve You

Because moving our inventory online is a work in progress, you may not find everything you want or need today. You may see a message that says, No products are currently available in this category. But don't worry! You can still use our current list and order as usual while our shelves are being filled. To order from the catalog, Download the 2010 NESC Products Catalog pdf file (932 KB in size). Eventually all of our products will be available to you through the Free Shopping Cart. We welcome your comments about this service.



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Buttermilk Bay Coliform Control Project: Demonstrating Practical Tools for Watershed Management Through the National Estuary Program
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Located at the north end of Buzzard's Bay, is Buttermilk Bay, a recreational, tidal embayment where many residents and visitors sun bathe, boat and fish. This fact sheet features the Buttermilk Bay Demonstration Project which was designed to control the discharge of fecal coliform into the bay. Project objectives included identifying sources of fecal coliform, employing Best Management Practices (BMPs) to control runoff, and implementing local regulations t control coliform. Results of the project are detailed along with several lessons learned during the implantation phases of the project.

WWFSMG28DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00
Buying a Home with a Private Well? Test the Water Before You Buy.
Buying a Home with a Private Well? Test the Water Before You Buy.
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

This tip sheet explains the responsibilities of both homebuyers and home sellers with regard to well water testing during the property transfer process. It includes a list of recommended water tests and those required by the state of Rhode Island. Some information is specific to Rhode Island.

DWFSPE453DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2013)

Price: $0.00


 
Buying a Home with a Well
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

This fact sheet gives first-time well owners clear guidance about how to inspect a well.

DWFSPE404DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Buying or Selling a Home with an Onsite Wastewater System
National Environmental Services Center

This issue of Pipeline discusses the issues anyone who is buying or selling a home with a septic system may face. The newsletter includes information about inspections, system types, and typical questions a buyer or seller may need to consider.

SFPLNL54DL/Newsletter: 8 pp. (2011)

Price: $0.00


 
Buzzards Bay "SepTrack" Initiative: Demonstrating Practical Tools for Watershed Management Through the National Estuary Program
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Buzzard's Bay Watershed includes 432 square miles and a population of nearly 236,000. Approximately half the homes utilize onsite systems to treat wastewater. Problematic onsite systems have lead to the contamination of waters resulting in the closure of shellfish beds and other water-contact recreation activities. Local boards of health typically lack the ability to efficiently and effectively monitor septic system permits, inspection, and maintenance information due to insufficient staffing and information-processing equipment and systems.

The SepTrack Demonstration Project provided computers and specialized software to communities to allow them to better manage information related to onsite systems, thereby freeing staff time for better design review and enforcement and to identify patterns of failure. Success stories along with lessons learned from the project are included in this overview of the Buzzards Bay "SepTrack" Initiative. This product could be useful to anyone involved with the management of septic systems, local officials, public health officials, state regulatory agencies, managers, state officials and the general public.

WWFSMG29DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
Care and Feeding of Your Septic System
National Environmental Services Center

Second in a series of three brochures, this describes how to prolong the life of your septic system. The brochure includes schematic diagrams of septic systems and discusses what should and should not be put into the system. Tank sizes are charted according to household size. The brochure discusses absorption fields and recommended pumping frequency.

WWBRPE18DL/Brochure: 2pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00


 
Care and Feeding of Your Septic System (Spanish Version)
National Environmental Services Center

Second in a series of three brochures, this describes how to prolong the life of your septic system. The brochure includes schematic diagrams of septic systems and discusses what should and should not be put into the system. Tank sizes are charted according to household size. The brochure discusses absorption fields and recommended pumping frequency.

WWBRPE57DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
Careers in Water Quality
Careers in Water Quality
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

In this video produced by the Water Pollution Control Federation, a teacher and his students explore water quality careers as they work on a class project. They interview people in various water-related professions, including scientists, computer specialists, engineers, attorneys, and government officials. The students realize that pursuing a career in the water quality field can make a worthwhile contribution to the environment and be personally rewarding as well.

DWDVPE25DL/Video: 0 pp. (2005)

*** For video downloading and viewing instructions, please use this link

Price: $0.00


 
Case Studies of Economic Analysis and Community Decision Maiking for Decentralized Wastewater Systems
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This download examines how communities consider and value the benefits and costs of different scale wastewater facility options (onsite, cluster, and centralized) in monetary terms, and examines the driving issues, motivations, thought processes and decision-making methods that stakeholders use relative to choices of wastewater system scale. The download includes eight case studies of U.S. communities covering several topics including financial benefits of incremental capacity expansion through implementation of decentralized systems; impacts of wastewater system choices on community growth, development, and autonomy; and the implications for fairness and equity within communities.

WWCDCS25DL/Multiple Files 4.9MB: 0 pp. (0)

Price: $0.00
 
Case Studies of Sustainable Water and Wastewater Pricing
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

How much customers are asked to pay for any commodity or service sends a signal to them about the value of the product or service. Fees and other charges that reflect the full cost of water service will help customers to recognize the value of that service, and hopefully helping them become more aware of how much water they use and how they use it. This booklet reveals how eight small communities across the country have developed and implemented sustainable pricing practices.

FMBLCS29DL/Booklet: 25 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Catalog of Federal Funding Sources for Watershed Protection
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This brochure guides readers to the watershed funding website housed at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Users of this website can search a database containing approximately 100 programs offering financial assistance for watershed-related projects. The website updates EPA's Catalog of Federal Funding Sources for Watershed Protection (Second Edition) printed in 1999.

DWBKFN30DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Characterizing the Effect of Chlorine and Chloramines on the Formation of Biofilm in a Simulated Drinking Water Distribution System
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Labority, Office of Research and Development

An important aspect of maintaining water quality in drinking water distributions systems is controlling the biofilm that grows on the walls of the distribution pipes. This booklet reveals the results of a recent study on the effects of chlorine on reducing this film.

DWBLMG96DL/Booklet: 46 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Check Up Program for Small Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This package explains CUPSS - EPA's software program that helps you organize and develop a plan for the physical and financial health of your drinking water or wastewater utility. All CUPSS files are included in this download.

DWBKFN44DL/Package: 193 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Chemical Aids Manual for Wastewater Treatment Facilities
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This manual discusses the proper use of common chemicals in wastewater treatment processes. The manual gives practical guidelines for using chemicals to overcome temporary operational problems or to upgrade performance without extensive design work or plant modifications. The manual specifically addresses:

• chemical selection in terms of treatment efficiency, cost, and other considerations;

• selecting points for injecting chemicals;

• determining proper chemical dosages;

• sludge considerations associated with chemical additions;

• identifying equipment for proper feeding and handling; and

• general information about each chemical, including uses, available forms, commercial strength, cost, safety considerations, feeders, storage, handling materials, and major manufacturers

WWBKOM17DL/Book: 197 pp. (1979)

Price: $0.00


 
Chepachet Village Decentralized Wastewater Demonstration Project
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension Water Quality Program

The Chepachet Village Decentralized Wastewater Demonstration Project (CVDWDP) began when the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (RIDEM) performed a shoreline inspection that discovered a number of homes in need of repair and maintenance to their septic systems. Many homes had difficulty with the repairs due to small lots, surface drainage problems, land slopes, and shallow groundwater. RIDEM began working in conjunction with the University of Rhode Island, Rhode Island Independent Contractors and Associates, and non-profit agencies to begin using alternative onsite wastewater technologies to repair failing septic systems and developed a conceptual plan for village wastewater management using computer-generated maps. This booklet summarizes the results of CVDWDP and offers one approach other New England communities can adopt to meet pressing wastewater treatment needs, while protecting public health and environmental quality.

WWBLCS26DL/Book: 43 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Children and Drinking Water Standards
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

People want to know that their children drink safe tap water. This EPA booklet explains how national standards contribute to drinking water safety and helps readers make informed choices about their drinking water. The booklet includes a list of contaminants, acceptable concentrations, their source, and contaminants' effects on children's health. DWBRPE104DL/Booklet: 16 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Chlorine Disinfection: A General Overview
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet provides an overview of chlorine disinfection of wastewater.

WWFSGN99DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Chlorine Disinfection: A Technical Overview
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet gives a technical overview of chlorine disinfection of wastewater to help people who are weighing treatment options. It describes how the chlorination process works, the basic components of the system, design information, performance characteristics, and the process for dechlorination. Included is an illustration of a compound-loop control system for chlorination with chlorine and dechlorination with sulfur dioxide. Case studies are provided in addition to operation and maintenance requirements, advantages and disadvantages, and cost information.

WWFSOM21DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Choose the Right Consultant for Your Wastewater Project
National Environmental Services Center

The Winter 1997 Pipeline offers suggestions and information for small communities planning to hire a wastewater consultant. Topics include sending requests for proposals (RFPs), conducting interviews, and negotiating contracts. The newsletter includes an article about how two small communities joined forces for a rural Pennsylvania wastewater project.

SFPLNL08DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
Choosing a Consultant to Delineate the Wellhead Protection Area
Purdue University, Cooperative Extension Service

The best way to ensure a safe water supply is to protect the area nearest a community public supply well from potential contamination. The wellhead protection area must be carefully delineated to focus attention on the area. This booklet offers tips to communities considering hiring a professional consultant to help them with this delineation plan.

DWFSMG125DL/Fact Sheet: 8 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Choosing a Wastewater Treatment System
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension, Water Quality Program

Conventional onsite systems can be a simple, low-cost, and environmentally friendly treatment option when maintained correctly, but if the system is not maintained and used properly it can lead to expensive repairs and reduced water quality. This manual discusses conventional systems with septic tank and drainfield facts, modifications for conventional systems, and a glossary for word reference. Alternative and innovative systems are also discussed in detail, especially site constraints, cost effectiveness, ecologically sensitive areas, and consistent treatment performance. A checklist is included to help choose which system is most appropriate for watershed and individual site considerations.

WWBLGN264DL/Booklet: 27pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Citizen Monitoring: Recommendations to Household Well Users
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Many people receive their drinking water from individually owned and operated sources such as household wells, cisterns, and springs. As private sources, system owners are solely responsible for the quality of the water provided. This booklet provides information about drinking water issues and steps consumers might use to protect their wells from contamination.

DWBLPE32DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1990)

Price: $0.00


 
Citizen's Guide to Ground-Water Protection
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This document introduces the natural cycle of groundwater and how groundwater can become contaminated. It examines ways to protect groundwater supplies and describes the roles that individuals and communities can play in protecting groundwater supplies.

DWBLPE37DL/Booklet: 34 pp. (1990)

Price: $0.00
 
Class II Injection Wells and Your Drinking Water
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Injection wells are man-made or improved holes in the ground used to dispose of fluids underground. Class II wells inject fluids associated with oil and natural gas production. This brochure discusses Class II wells and how the EPA regulates their use to protect groundwater.

DWBRRG70DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00


 
Class V Injection Wells and Your Drinking Water
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

More than 89 percent of U.S. public water supplies come from groundwater sources. These water supplies are vulnerable to contamination from liquid waste disposal sites called "Class V" wells. This brochure explains what Class V wells are, where they are located, and what to do if you have a Class V well located on your property.

DWBRPE103DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00
 
Class V Injection Wells: EPA Announces New Regulatory Requirements for Certain Class V Injection Wells
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Class V injection wells are typically shallow disposal systems used to place a variety of fluids underground. Through the Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program, EPA and the states regulate injection wells because they pose a potential risk to underground drinking water sources. This fact sheet examines specific regulations added to the UIC program in 1999 to deal with large capacity cesspools and motor vehicle waste disposal wells. It provides a timeline for compliance with these regulations and explains the responsibilities of owners, operators, and the states.

DWFSRG91DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Class V Rule
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Class V wells are shallow disposal systems located in every state, especially in unsewered areas where the population is also likely to depend on groundwater as a drinking water source. Revisions to the Class V Rule added new requirements for motor vehicle waste disposal wells and large-capacity cesspools. This fact sheet explains the rule and its revisions and outlines the implementation schedule for states and regions and for owners and operators.

DWFSRG67DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
Clean Ground Water: Virginia's Endangered Inheritance
Clean Ground Water: Virginia's Endangered Inheritance
Virginia Department of Health

This video describes the effects septic systems can have on groundwater. It details the importance of groundwater and the construction and operation of septic systems. Alternative septic systems also are presented.

DWDVGN73DL/Video: 0 pp. (0)

*** For video downloading and viewing instructions, please use this link

Price: $0.00


 
Clean Water State Revolving Fund Funding Framework
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet explains federal policy on nonpoint source and estuary projects' eligibility for state revolving fund (SRF) assistance to enhance the process for making future eligibility decisions at the state level. This booklet can help states establish relative priorities for using SRF funds to correct water quality problems on a statewide or watershed basis. This booklet discusses selecting "nontraditional" projects, establishing voluntary guidelines for funding traditional SRF projects, and setting national policy for states that wish to use their SRF to fund innovative projects.

FMBLFN25DL/Booklet: 16 pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00
 
Clean Water: It's Time to Learn the Facts
Lakehead Region Conservation Authority

A model source protection plan safeguards our health and health of our families, ensures that safe, clean drinking water is available and protects current and future sources of drinking water. This pamphlet describes the protection area of the Lakehead Region Conservation Authority (that abuts Lake Superior) and educates residents on their role.

DWBRPE359DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Cleaner Water Through Conservation
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wetlands, Oceans & Watersheds

This book explains the relationship between water quantity and quality and how people can improve water quality in general by conserving.

DWBKPE53DL/Book: 67 pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00
 
Cleaning Up Polluted Runoff with the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet discusses the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) created to address water quality projects including nonpoint sources, wetlands, estuaries, watersheds, as well as more traditional wastewater treatment systems. The 51 SRF programs issue approximately $4 billion in loans annually. CWSRFs have an excess of $42 billion in assets. This fact sheet describes how a loan may be better for a community than a grant because cash is not required upfront, cost savings, and fewer federal requirements. Eligible recipients, including communities, individuals citizen groups, and nonprofit organizations are listed.

FMFSFN30DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Closing an Abandoned Well
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

Abandoned wells may be full of contaminants threatening the water quality in nearby wells. Large diameter open wells also pose a threat to children and animals. This fact sheet describes the risks of abandoned wells, how to find lost wells and provides details on how to seal an abandoned well.

DWFSPE402DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Cluster Wastewater Systems Planning Handbook
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This manual has two objectives. First, it outlines a comprehensive wastewater management planning process that allows communities to assess where and how cluster systems are appropriate, and thereby enabling the development of an optimized, decentralized wastewater management plan. Second, it provides technical and planning information to assist land use planners, engineers, developers, and other stakeholders in developing and implementing cluster wastewater systems.

WWBKMG33DL/Book: 174pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Collection Systems O&M Fact Sheet Sewer Cleaning and Inspection
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

As sewer system networks age, the risk of blockage and collapse becomes a major concern for municipalities. A proactive cleaning and inspection program is essential to maintaining a properly functioning system. This fact sheet details the various technologies recommended to carry out these procedures. Tables are provided that describe some of the more common sewer cleaning methods and suggested the most appropriate applications of these methods. Limitations of the different inspection techniques and cleaning methods are also described. Two actual case studies are included.

WWFSOM59DL/Fact Sheet: 11pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Collection Systems Technology Fact Sheet: Sewers, Lift Station
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Wastewater lift stations are facilities designed to move wastewater from lower to higher elevation through pipes. This fact sheet describes various lift station design and control alternatives, advantages and disadvantages, design criteria, operation and maintenance, and cost associated with lift stations.

WWFSGN257DL/Fact Sheet: 8 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Combined Sewer Overflow Control
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

This manual discusses how to select and design control measures to reduce pollutant discharges from combined sewer overflows (CSOs). It presents design information for six commonly used CSO control programs and may be useful to those that develop and review facility plans and long-term CSO control programs.

WWBKDM75DL/Book: 102pp. (1993)

Price: $0.00
 
Combined Sewer Overflow Management Fact Sheet: Pollution Prevention
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet provides information about combined sewer overflows management with a focus on pollution prevention best management practices.

WWFSMG69DL/Fact Sheet: 9 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Combined Sewer Overflow Technologies Fact Sheet: Chlorine Disinfection
U.S. Environmental Protection Agnecy, Office of Water

This fact sheet about combined sewer overflows (CSO) to emphasize that necessity of wastewater disinfection of the combined sewer system (CSS). CSOs tend to occur during periods of rainfall or snowmelt when total wastewater flow exceed the capacity of the CSS. A CSS is typically designed to overflow directly into surface water bodies, such as lakes, rivers, estuaries, or coastal waters. CSOs can carry pollutants such as suspended solids, pathogens, viruses, cysts, and chemicals that may impose an imminent danger to public health.

WWFSGN236DL/Fact Sheet: 10 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs)—A Priority for Small Communities
National Environmental Services Center

The Spring 1995 Pipeline focuses on combined sewer overflow (CSO) issues for small communities. It describes what a CSO is and why CSO controls are important. The newsletter also discusses control policies and guidance documents available to assist communities with controlling CSOs. The newsletter includes two case studies featuring small communities and how they are working to solve CSO problems.

SFPLNL01DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00


 
Coming Together for Clean Water: EPA's Strategy to Protect America's Waters
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report outlines the challenges that were highlighted at the April 15, 2010, Coming Together for Clean Water forum, describes the public participation process, and highlights the EPA’s priorities for achieving clean water goals. Despite many successes over recent years, the rate at which waters are being listed for impairment exceeds the rate at which they are being restored. This report summarizes EPA’s commitment to meet the challenges it faces, including infrastructure, climate, and public participation.

DWBLMG214DL/Booklet: 14 pp. (2011)

Price: $0.00
 
Communicating in a Crisis: Risk Communication Guidelines for Public Officials
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service

In times of emergency, it is imperative that public officials know how to communicate effectively with the public and the media and to deliver messages that inform them without frightening and educate with provoking alarm. This booklet is an indispensable resource for public officials interested in the basic rules of effective communications. This is a practical guide to the tools of the trade of media relations and public communications. Strategies for addressing the public in times of crisis are described.

DWBKMG134DL/Book: 96 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Community Facilities Loans and Grants
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, Rural Housing Service

The Rural Housing Service provides loans and grants to develop essential rural community facilities in areas with up to 20,000 people. This fact sheet explains who is eligible and what kinds of facilities qualify for the funds, the terms and interest rates, and details about submitting applications for interested parties.

DWFSFN16DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Community Involvement in Drinking Water Source Assessments
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

By working with their state's source water protection program, community groups can help identify potential threats to their drinking water. They can also help local officials develop and implement a plan of action to prevent water quality problems. This fact sheet explains the four steps of source water assessments and how communities can participate in the process. It also describes how communities can use assessment information to protect local water sources.

DWFSGN53DL/Fact Sheet: 5 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


Community Onsite Options and Approaches to Onsite Management Videos on DVD
Community Onsite Options and Approaches to Onsite Management Videos on DVD
National Environmental Services Center

This video discusses the need for an implementation of onsite management systems (OMS) in five communities. Wastewater professionals from each of the communities explain why their community instituted an OMS, the approach they took, how it is administered, and its benefits. Ongoing, competent maintenance, monitoring, and management are emphasized, as well as discussion of advanced treatment systems, such as aerobic treatment units, sand filters, and cluster systems.

DPDVMG56DL/17 Minute Video: 0 pp. (0)

*** For video downloading and viewing instructions, please use this link

Price: $0.00
 
Community Wellhead Protection Programs
Oklahoma State University, Cooperative Extension Service

The development of wellhead protection programs is a major preventive approach for the protection of community drinking water supplies. This booklet, produced by the Oklahoma State University, is useful for communities in the early stages of their wellhead protection program. Key concepts to consider during this process are explained.

DWFSGN78DL/Fact Sheet: 8 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Community-Based Environmental Protection: A Resource Book for Protecting Ecosystems and Communities
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Policy, Planning, & Evaluation

This book discusses how local communities play a prominent role in environmental protection and describes how recreational, economic, and other activities affect the quality of ecosystems. It draws on the experiences of several communities to provide examples of community-based environmental programs. It also shows how others have assessed the interrelationships between their community goals, such as residential development and ecosystem quality.

GNBKGN12DL/Book: 144 pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00
 
Community-Based Watershed Management: Lessons from the National Estuary Program
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Coastal Management Branch

Estuaries are special areas where freshwater from rivers mixes with saltwater from the ocean. Some of the most biologically productive places on earth, they are also fragile. Pressure from human population resulting in habitat loss, nutrient loadings, toxic chemical and pathogens can sharply degrade this productivity.

This booklet hopes to encourages community-based water shed management by presenting lessons learned from the National Estuary Program. after nearly 20 years of experience. Suggestions on how to establish governance, how to identify problems and solutions, and how to develop and implement the management plan are throughly described.

WWBKPE123DL/Book: 124pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Compendium of Tools for Watershed Assessment and TMDL Development
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This book summarizes various models and tools that can be used in water quality planning and pollution control to support watershed assessment and to develop total maximum daily loads (TMDLs). Three major categories of models are discussed: watershed loading, receiving water, and ecological asessment. The book includes a wide range of tools and offers selection criteria to assist the user in choosing the model(s) appropriate for a particular application.

WWBKGN96DL/Book: 242 pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
Compilation of Quick Reference Guides
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This packet contains the EPA's quick reference guides to regulatory rulings, such as the Arsenic Rule, Filter Backwash Recycling Rule, Radionuclides Rule, and several others. Each guide provides an overview of the rule, its provisions and requirments, critical deadlines, and the public health benefits resulting from implementation.

DWPKRG31DL/Package: 14 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Complying with the Ground Water Rule: Small Entity Compliance Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agnecy, Office of Water

The Ground Water Rule applies to all public water systems that are supplied by a ground water source. This guide is designed for owners and operators of public water systems serving 10,000 or fewer persons. This booklet offers guidance for how this rule affects your system, what your monitoring responsibilities are, how to correct for significant problems and suggests sources of funding for compliance with these requirements.

DWBLMG150DL/Booklet: 51pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Complying with the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule: Small Entity Compliance Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet has information about complying with the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule and is intended for operators of systems serving fewer than 10,000 people.

DWBLRG127DL/Booklet: 45pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Complying With the Revised Drinking Water Standard for Arsenic: Small Entity Compliance Guide; One of the Simple Tools for Effective Performance (STEP) Guide Series
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

Long-term exposure to arsenic in drinking water has been linked to several forms of cancer, especially bladder and lung cancer, and to other health problems, such as diabetes and heart disease. This guide can help your small system protect customers' health by providing information about the Arsenic Rule and how it affects your system, funding for compliance, monitoring and reporting responsibilities, and preparing for compliance dates.

DWBLOM63DL/Book: 58 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Complying With the Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule: Basic Guide—One of the Simple Tools for Effective Performance (STEP) Guide Series; For Small Systems Adding Any Chemical Disinfectant
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Biproducts Rule (Stage 1 DBPR) applies to water systems that add a chemical disinfectant such as chlorine, chloramines, chlorine dioxide or ozone to their drinking water during any part of the treatment process. This booklet describes the minimum federal requirements under the Stage 1 DBPR on the health risks associated with disinfectants, monitoring requirements, compliance standards, and reporting guidelines.

DWBKRG114DL/Book: 77 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Complying With the Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule: Supplement A—One of the Simple Tools for Effective Performance (STEP) Guide Series; For Small Systems Adding Chlorine Dioxide or Ozone
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office Of Water

The Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Biproducts Rule (Stage 1 DBPR) applies to water systems that add a chemical disinfectant such as chlorine, chloramines, chlorine dioxide or ozone to their drinking water during any part of the treatment process. This guide serves as a companion to the Basic Guide. This supplemental guide for drinking water system operators discusses the monitoring required for chlorine dioxide, chlorite and bromate, how to determine if you are incompliance, and what to report to the state and to your customers.

DWBKRG115DL/Book: 74 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Complying With the Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule: Supplement—One of the Simple Tools for Effective Performance (STEP) Guide Series; For Small Subpart H Systems Using Conventional Filtration Treatment
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule applies to water systems that add a chemical disinfectant such as chlorine, chloramines, chlorine dioxide, or ozone to their drinking water during any part of the treatment process. Systems that will typically find this EPA guide useful include small towns, rural water districts, tribal systems, homeowners associations and small private systems. This guide serves as a companion to the Basic Guide.

DWBLRG116DL/Book: 52 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Composting Biosolids
New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission

This brochure discusses the processes most commonly used in composting biosolids: windrow, aerated static pile, and in-vessel. Potential markets and beneficial uses of composted biosolids are briefly discussed. The brochure provides contacts throughout the New England area.

WWBRGN113DL/Brochure: 2pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Composting Toilet Systems: A General Overview
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet provides an overview of composting toilet systems.

WWFSGN106DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Composting Toilet Systems: A Technical Overview
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet is intended to help people who are weighing treatment options by giving a technical overview of composting toilet systems. The fact sheet describes how the composting process works and the basic components of a composting toilet system. An illustration of a composting toilet is included, in addition to a table of typical pathogen survival times at 20 to 30 degrees Celsius in various environments. Case studies are provided, along with information on performance, cost, advantages and disadvantages, and operation and maintenance.

WWFSOM28DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) and Their Effect on Water Pollution
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wastewater Management

This fact sheet discusses animal feeding operations that confine livestock or poultry before the animals are sent to the market for sale or to processing plants for slaughter and packaging. These concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) can potentially contaminate nearby creeks, streams, rivers, lakes, and estuaries from runoff and discharges during normal operations. The fact sheet discusses how the EPA’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program regulates the discharge of CAFOs pollutants by permit.

WWFSGN118DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00


Concentrations of hormones, pharmaceuticals and other micropollutants in groundwater affected by septic systems in New England and New York
Concentrations of hormones, pharmaceuticals and other micropollutants in groundwater affected by septic systems in New England and New York
U.S. Geological Survey

Septic-system discharges can be an important source of micropollutants (including pharmaceuticals and endocrine active compounds) to adjacent groundwater and surface water systems. This booklet contains information about an assessment of the effects on groundwater from a single septic system that receives discharge from an extended health care facility for the elderly in New England. It also also included assessments of many small septic systems used seasonally on a densely populated portion of Fire Island. The data collected from these two networks indicate that hydrogeologic and demographic factors affect micropollutant concentrations in these systems.

DWBLMG232DL/Booklet: 12 pp. (2015)

Price: $0.00
 
Conflict Resolution and Negotiation Skills for Integrated Water Resources - Training Manual
Conflict Prevention and Cooperation in International Water Resources by Wa- terNet, UNESCO and UNESCO-IHE, International Network for Capacity Building in Integrated Water Resources Management

Given the central importance of water resources to all human communities, it is natural that conflicts arise with regard to access, allocation, development and management of the resource. It is equally clear, however, that necessity is not only the mother of invention, but also the basis for extensive cooperative activities concerning the management of water resources. Thus both conflictual and cooperative behaviors—across time and space and at all levels of human social organization—constitute the norm where water resources are concerned. This training manual leads students through a series of modules preparing them to address conflict, develop negotiation skills, and build good water governance.

DWBKMG186DL/Book: 95pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00


 
Consecutive System Guide for the Ground Water Rule
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Ground Water Rule, published by the EPA in 2006, is designed to provide protection against microbial pathogens in public water systems that use ground water. This guidebook describes the regulatory requirements of the Ground Water Rule as it applies to wholesale and consecutive water systems.

DWBLRG126DL/Booklet: 26 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Consider the Source: A Pocket Guide to Protecting Your Drinking Water
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

Virtually every stream, lake, river, and aquifer in this country is used as a drinking water source. Protecting these source waters from contaminants is a major national priority. This booklet discusses the Source Water Protection Program and provides suggestions and descriptions for water protection measures that can be used in any community.

DWBLPE136DL/Booklet: 52 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Consider the Source: An Interactive Guide to Protecting America's Drinking Wtaer
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This download provides users with a picture of how water gets to consumers, following its journey for source to tap—describing virtually everything that happens along the way.

DWCDPE393DL/Multiple Zip Files 2.3 MB: 0 pp. (2004)

*Mac users start by opening source.swf with a Flash media viewer.

Price: $0.00
 
Consolidated Water Rates: Issues and Practices in Single-Tariff Pricing
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Consolidated rates or single-tariff pricing uses a unified rate structure for multiple water or other systems that are owned and operated by a single utility. This report provides stakeholders with an overview of the issue and the complex trade-offs involved with implementing the practice.

DWBKMG22DL/Book: 122 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Constructed Wetlands
National Environmental Services Center

This technology overview focuses mainly on subsurface-flow constructed wetlands. Basic design guidelines are detailed for individual residential applications. Operating and maintenance requirements are briefly outlined, and costs to install a wetland system are estimated for a single-family application.

SFBLTO08DL/Booklet: 8pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Constructed Wetlands Treatment of Municipal Wastewaters
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research & Development

This manual discusses the design and maintenance of constructed wetlands and when they are most applicable. For some situations, wetlands are an excellent option because they are low in cost and maintenance requirements, offer good performance, and provide a natural appearance, if not more beneficial ecological benefits. However, because wetlands require large land areas, they are not appropriate for some applications. Constructed wetlands are especially well suited for wastewater treatment in small communities where inexpensive land is available.

WWBKDM98DL/Book: 166 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Constructed Wetlands/Natural Wetlands
Tennessee Valley Authority

This fact sheet provides general information on the use of constructed/natural wetlands for wastewater treatment. The fact sheet contains a brief description of why wetlands are important and what the general public can do to help protect them. Sources for additional information are included.

WWFSGN84DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
Constructed Wetlands: A Natural Treatment Alternative
National Environmental Services Center

The Summer 1998 Pipeline presents the advantages and disadvantages of two types of constructed wetlands: surface flow and subsurface flow systems. Articles explain how wetland systems function and how they can be used with community systems and individual onsite systems to treat wastewater. A case study describes how an Ohio community used subsurface flow wetlands for onsite wastewater treatment.

SFPLNL14DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Consumer Confidence Report Rule: A Quick Reference Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet provides an overview of the Consumer Confidence Report Rule and includes how these reports can increase the safety of drinking water supplies and raise public awareness and support. It also includes information about the annual requirements, available resources, and more.

DWFSRG140DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
Consumer Confidence Report Rule: Quick Reference Sheet for State Review of CCRs
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Water suppliers that serve the same people year round are required to prepare annual consumer confidence reports for their customers. The reports tell where drinking water comes from, what's in it, and how you can help protect it. This checklist is intended to help states determine if water suppliers and state primacy agencies are meeting CCR requirements. There are three main sections included in this review: Report Delivery and Recordkeeping Requirements, Minimum Content and Format Requirements, and Monitoring Data and Compliance Information Requirements.

DWFSRG99DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Consumer Confidence Reports: Building Public Trust
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

A consumer confidence report (CCR) tells customers wehre their drinking water comes from, what's in it, and how they can protect it. This booklet contains success stories and tips that show how CCRs can help build communities' trust in their water utilities.

DWBLMG72DL/Booklet: 2 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Consumer Fact Sheet on Cyanide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

Cyanide may cause health problems if found in amounts greater than the health standard set by the U.S. EPA. This fact sheet describes cyanide, its health effects, and how it occurs in the environment, including some public or private drinking water supplies.

DWFSPE230DL/Fact Sheet: 3 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Contaminants and Drinking-Water Sources in 2001: Recent Findings of the U.S. Geological Survey
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey studies numerous issues related to contamination of drinking water. They monitor distribution, sources, transport, transformations, and the fate of contaminants, and they assess the vulnerability of source waters. This booklet discusses the outcome of their research and includes examples of drinking water related projects completed or underway at the USGS.

DWBLPE117DL/Booklet: 13 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Contamination Explorer: Technical Assistance for Small Water Systems
Montana Water Center

This 2.5-hour course covers subjects such as line replacement, pathogens, storm water runoff, arsenic and biofilms. Special animated activities help the learner understand contamination processes and possible treatment methods. Case studies present expert analysis of major water contamination events. Video segments, printable charts and tables are also included.

DWCDTR24DL/Zip File Download 512MB (2007)

Note that this file is large and we recommend downloading with broadband internet service. Also note that this product may not save your work if you have Windows 7 as your operating system. Using Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Mac OS X will allow you to document progress.

Price: $0.00


 
Contemporary Issues in Drinking Water and Wastewater: A Quick Guide for Public Officials
National Environmental Services Center

This PowerPoint presentation provides an overview of several current issues impacting the drinking water and wastewater arenas.

DWBKMG163DL/Downloadable File: 50 pp. (2011)

Price: $0.00
 
Control and Mitigation of Drinking Water Losses in Distribution Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Maintaining system infrastructure to deliver clean and safe drinking water to customers is often a significant challenge for the operators of public water systems. Much of the estimated 880,000 miles of drinking water infrastructure in the U.S. has been in service for decades and can be a significant source of water loss. In addition to physical loss of water from the distribution system, water can be “lost” through unauthorized consumption (theft), administrative errors, data handling errors, and metering inaccuracies or failure. Water is a commodity; therefore, lost or unaccounted-for water can be equated to lost or unaccounted-for revenue. This document explains the importance of a water loss control program and how it can help to locate and reduce these water losses and thus maintain or increase revenue.

DWBKMG220DL/Book: 176 pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00


Converting Laboratory Units into Consumer Confidence Report Units
Converting Laboratory Units into Consumer Confidence Report Units
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Rule requires community water systems (CWSs) to present drinking water standards and water sample results as numbers greater than or equal to 1.0 in order to enhance consumer understanding of their drinking water quality. These units are often referred to as CCR units. This fact sheet is designed to assist CWSs, to convert their laboratory results into CCR units. Several conversion examples are provided as well as resources for more information. In addition, the complete list of NPDWR standards in CCR units and their accompanying conversion factors is included at the end of this fact sheet.

DWBLMG233DL/Booklet: 15pp. (2015)

Price: $0.00
 
Coping with Low Water Levels
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

This fact sheet gives homeowners tips for coping with low water levels in their private well. Information is included about why water levels change, how to measure water levels and options for making an existing well more efficient.

DWFSPE403DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Copper in Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Copper rarely occurs naturally in drinking water but my be present as a result of corrosion from the plumbing system. Indications of copper, testing for its presence and corrective actions to take are discussed in this fact sheet.

DWFSPE290DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Copper, Drinking Water, and You
Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities and the National Drinking Water Clearinghouse

This factsheet explains how copper enters drinking water and the effects it can have on people if consumed. EPA’s maximum contaminant level for copper in drinking water is discussed, as well as ways consumers can obtain safe water.

DWFSPE30DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (1993)

Price: $0.00


 
Corrosion Manual for Internal Corrosion of Water Distribution Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Drinking Water

This manual provides information about the causes and types of corrosion, as well as practical guidance for detecting and solving corrosion-related problems.

DWBKDM15DL/Book: 130 pp. (1984)

Price: $0.00
 
Creative Community Design and Wastewater Management
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This manual demonstrates how advanced decentralized wastewater treatment systems can be used to support more compact land use patterns that would otherwise be infeasible with conventional wastewater treatment systems. The manual also informs how decentralized technologies can be powerful tools in directing sustainable community development while protecting local water resources. Developers, wastewater treatment system designers and installers, and homeowners will also find ideas on fitting septic systems into landscapes in ways that retain natural features and unique architectural elements of a community and add value to properties.

WWBKMG27DL/Book: 200pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Crisis & Emergency Risk Communication Tool Kit
State of California, Department of Health Services

To provide smaller water systems the resource materials necessary to effectively manage and communicate during an emergency, the California Department of Health Services has produced this workbook. Detailed recommendations for how to develop a crisis community plan and how to work effectively with the media are presented.

DWCDMG132DL/Book: 101 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

This course is designed to explain and teach the importance of communication by science or public health professionals during a crisis or emergency. Communication is crucial for helping individuals, stakeholders, or an entire community make the best possible decision during a crisis. The reader will be introduced to the communication principles and tools as they relate to emergency risk communication.

DWBKMG135DL/Book: 277pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Cross - Connection Control Manual
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Public health officials have long been concerned about cross connections and backflow connections in plumbing systems and in public drinking water systems. This manual describes methods and devices for preventing backflow and backsiphonage, testing procedures for backflow preventers, and creating a control program to protect public health.

DWCDOM76DL/Book: 52 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Cross-Connection Control Manual
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Plumbing cross-connections, defined as actual or potential connections between a potable and non-potable water supply, constitute a serious public health hazard. This manual is an educational and technical reference for conducting cross-connection control programs. Water contamination case histories and cross-connection control practices are provided.

DWBLDM03DL/Book: 52 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Cross-Connection Control: A Best Practices Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Cross-connections can occur at many points throughout a distribution system and can create dangerous opportunities for contamination. This pamphlet gives operators and engineers quick tips on preventing these backflow occurrences. It describes how to design and implement a cross-connection control program and suggests technologies for back flow prevention.

DWFSMG113DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Cryptosporidiosis and Drinking Water—Information for Individuals with Weakened Immune Systems Due to: Cancer Treatment, Organ Transplants, Inherited Diseases, or HIV/AIDS
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Division of Epidemiology, Environmental and Occupational Health Consumer and Environmental Health Services

This brochure provides information about cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness caused by Cryptosporidium parvum, a microscopic parasite sometimes found in drinking water. It provides an overview of the illness and provides information about how to avoid getting sick, as well as how to detect and treat the illness.

DWBRPE201DL/Brochure: 2pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Cryptosporidium and Drinking Water
Arizona Department of Environmental Quality

Cryptosporidium parvum is an intestinal parasite that can cause diarrhea, nausea, cramps, and other symptoms. This fact sheet discusses the illness cryptosporidiosis, how the parasites get into water, and how public drinking water can be protected.

DWBRPE162DL/Brochure: 2pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00
 
Cryptosporidium and Drinking Water (Spanish)
Arizona Department of Environmental Quality

Cryptosporidium parvum is an intestinal parasite that can cause diarrhea, nausea, cramps, and other symptoms. This brochure discusses the illness cryptosporidiosis, how the parasites get into water, and how public drinking water can be protected.

DWBRPE173DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00


 
Cryptosporidium in Drinking Water
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Servics, Division of Epidemiology, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, Consumer and Environmental Health Services

Cryptosporidium is a microscopic parasite capable of living in the intestines of humans and animals. This booklet discusses how the parasite is passed to humans from contaminated drinking water and provides information about related health concerns. It also includes information about preventing and treating Cryptosporidium outbreaks.

DWBLPE212DL/Fact Sheet: 16 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Cryptosporidium: Drinking Water Health Advisory
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water

Chryptosporidium, a pathogenic protozoan, is common in untreated water and can persist for months in this environment. Common water disinfection practices, such as chlorination, are ineffective, but a well-operated water filtration system can remove 99 percent of the oocysts. This booklet describes the organism, avenues of transmission to humans, and the regulations regarding its elimination from drinking water.

DWBLPE193DL/Booklet: 31 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Customer Incentives for Water Conservation: A Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

As political, economic and environmental pressures mount against finding new sources of supply, water utilities are increasing turning to conservation to reduce demand. One of the biggest challenges is how to motivate customers to conserve. This handbook helps water agencies to design effective conservation programs. Included are case studies from Los Angeles and Seattle detailing their ongoing programs.

DWBKMG106DL/Book: 144 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00
 
Cuyahoga Board of Health Coastal Nonpoint Pollution Control Program Grant
Cuyahoga County Board of Health

IIn April 2002, The Cuyahoga County Board of Health began work on a grant from Ohio’s Department of Natural Resources. The goal of this project was to reduce the contamination within the Lake Erie watershed that emanates from inadequate household sewage treatment systems and to help assess water quality in the chagrin River and surrounding watershed. The project consisted of sampling for fecal coliform, macro invertebrates and water quality. Educational outreach and dissemination of results were also part of the project. This brochure summarizes the grant project.

WWBLGN267DL/Booklet: 6pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Decentralized Systems Technology Fact Sheet: Low Pressure Pipe Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Less than one-third of the land area in the U.S. has soil conditions suitable for conventional soil absorption systems. Although not an alternative for all unsuitable soils, the low-pressure pipe (LPP) system has proven to be useful to some specific conditions where conventional systems frequently fail. This fact sheet describes the LPP system, its main components, applicability, advantages and disadvantages, design criteria (including soil, space, drainage, and topography requirements), performance, operation and maintenance, and costs. The LPP system is illustrated, and a general maintenance schedule is included. References and resources for additional information are listed. This information may be useful to wastewater professionals who install onsite systems and homeowners.

WWFSGN209DL/Fact Sheet: 7 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Decentralized Systems Technology Fact Sheet: Aerobic Treatment
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Historically, aerobic treatment was not feasible on a small scale, and septic tanks were the primary treatment device. But recent technology advances have made individual aerobic treatment systems efficient and affordable. The basic aerobic treatment process involves providing a suitable oxygen-rich environment for organisms to reduce the organic portion of the waste into carbon dioxide and water in the presence of oxygen. This fact sheet describes the aerobic treatment process and current aerobic treatment systems. It includes information about applicability, advantages and disadvantages, design criteria, performance, operation and maintenance, and costs.

WWFSGN170DL/Fact Sheet: 8 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Decentralized Systems Technology Fact Sheet: Evapotranspiration
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Evapotranspiration (ET) systems dispose of wastewater into the atmosphere through evaporation from the soil surface and/or transpiration by plants, without discharging wastewater to the surface water or groundwater reservoir. ET is most suitable for semi-arid climates. This fact sheet describes the overall ET process, its applicability, advantages and disadvantages, design criteria, performance, operation and maintenance, and costs.

WWFSGN204DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Decentralized Systems Technology Fact Sheet: Mound Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Mounds are pressure-dosed sand filters that lie above the soil surface and discharge directly to natural soil. They can be used to overcome certain soil and site conditions unsuitable for conventional septic tank soil absorption systems. This fact sheet discusses the three principal components of a mound system. Although there are now many different mound designs in use, this fact sheet focuses on the Wisconsin design, which has been widely accepted and incorporated into many state regulations. Applicability, advantages and disadvantages, design criteria, performance, implementation, operation and maintenance, and costs are outlined.

WWFSGN173DL/Fact Sheet: 7 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00

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