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Moving Our Inventory to Better Serve You

Because moving our inventory online is a work in progress, you may not find everything you want or need today. You may see a message that says, No products are currently available in this category. But don't worry! You can still use our current list and order as usual while our shelves are being filled. To order from the catalog, Download the 2010 NESC Products Catalog pdf file (932 KB in size). Eventually all of our products will be available to you through the Free Shopping Cart. We welcome your comments about this service.



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A Handbook of Constructed Wetlands—Volume 1: General Considerations
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Services and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region III,

This volume provides general information about wetland hydrology, soils, and vegetation. It discusses the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of constructed wetlands in the Mid-Atlantic region.

WWBKDM83DL/Book: 53pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00
 
A Health Guide for the Public in Disaster Planning and Recovery
State of West Virginia, Department of Health & Human Resources, Bureau for Public Health

Acidity or low pH of drinking water is usually a result of natural geological conditions at the site. This pamphlet informs homeowners of the potential effects of acidic or alkaline pH and offers some tips for corrective actions.

DWBLPE334DL/Booklet: 36 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
A Homeowner's Guide to Septic Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This guide was developed to help homeowners care for their septic systems. It explains how the system works and the steps homeowners can take to ensure the system works properly. It includes topics such as inspections, water conservation practices, and signs of system failure. Also discussed is how garbage disposals, hot tubs, water softeners, and household cleaners may affect system performance and longevity. The guide also includes a worksheet to help homeowners keep track of system maintenance.

WWBLPE95DL/Fact Sheet: 19 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
A Homeowner's Guide to Your Well
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

Modern wells provide a safe, efficient water supply to more than 42 million people nationwide. For many new homeowners, using and maintaining a well is a novel experience. This brochure provides answers to homeowners questions and includes a checklist for determining a well's condition.

DWBRPE399DL/Brochure: 2pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
A Manual for Managing Septic Systems
Sussex County Planning Department and New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy

This manual explains how a septic system works and why a management program is needed. Based on experiences in Sussex County, New Jersey, this manual describes what a homeowner should or shouldn't do in the daily operation of a septic system. The manual also provides guidance to local entities for periodic inspections and discusses potential institutional and financing arrangements. Although this manual targets New Jersey, it can serve as a guide for other states in the U.S.

WWBKOM41DL/Book: 182 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00
 
A Plain English Guide to the EPA Part 503 Biosolids Rule
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wastewater Management

This book helps readers interpret and implement the Part 503 Rule. The book details requirements for land application, surface disposal, incineration, reducing pathogens and vector attraction, sampling, and analysis. The appendix includes permit application requirements and state and federal biosolid contacts.

WWBKRG38DL/Book: 183 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00


 
A Regulators' Guide to the Management of Radioactive Residuals from Drinking Water Treatment Technologies
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The EPA's revised Radionuclides Rule ensures that all customers served by community water systems receive water that does not exceed maximum contaminant levels for radionuclides. This guide provides an overview of the best available treatment technologies and small system compliance technologies for radionuclide removal listed by the EPA, the wastes produced by these technologies, disposal options and considerations, and the federal statutes and regulations governing waste disposal.

DWBKMG76DL/Book: 81 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
A Shared Well Agreement
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

When buying a property with a shared well, a legal agreement is essential, to protect your access to the water supply and to spell out the costs and responsibilities involved in maintaining the system. This fact sheet offers a sample shared well water agreement and includes additional considerations when entering into this type of agreement.

DWBLPE405DL/Fact Sheet: 8pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
A Shortcut to Wellhead Protection Delineation for Some Systems
Purdue University, Cooperative Extension Service

Wellhead protection is a way to protect a water supply from contamination. Indiana's Wellhead Protection rule allows some smaller communities to choose between two separate methods for completing a delineation. Using "fixed radius methods" provides a shortcut to the delineation process. This pamphlet explains how to use the fixed radius method.

DWFSOM135DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
A Small Systems Guide to the Total Coliform Rule: Monitoring Drinking Water to Protect Public Health
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

As a drinking water operator, the important job is protecting customers' health. This book offers information about multiple protective barriers against coliform bacteria, the importance of monitoring drinking water and Total Coliform Rule requirements, steps to take if water samples indicate the presence of coliform bacteria, and a worksheet to keep track of monitoring and follow-up.

DWPKRG65DL/Book: 64 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
A Status of Tools and Support for Community Decentralized Wastewater Solutions
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This report is the result of two 2002 workshops (organized by the Green Mountain Institute for Environmental Democracy and supported by the National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project.) The purpose of the workshops was to better understand the services and tools available to communities and how these tools and services can be improved. Experts in the application of decentralized solutions met with representatives of community projects that had already or were in the process of deciding on wastewater solutions. This report tries to identify situations where additional effort can strengthen the participation of communities in making wastewater decisions that apply managed decentralized solutions, when appropriate.

The first part of this report is structured to run through each of the steps in the community process that leads to the choice and implementation of wastewater solutions. These steps constitute a "community process." From the observations noted, the remainder of the report identifies key findings that provide the basis for the last section of conclusions.

WWBKMG21DL/Book: 77pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
A Water and Wastewater Manager's Guide for Staying Financially Healthy
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet helps small water and sewer utility managers understand principles of financial management. It presents management tools to keep utilities financially healthy and running smoothly. The booklet can help determine the financial shape of a utility and lay a financial foundation for the future.

FDBLFN03DL/Booklet: 15 pp. (1989)

Price: $0.00


 
A Water Security Handbook: Planning for and Responding to Drinking Water Contamination Threats and Incidents
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

A water treatment system can be contaminated, damaged or disrupted by many means. This handbook should help water treatment plant operators develop a plan for quickly and effectively responding to contamination incidents. This handbook provides general advice and general procedures for emergency response.

DWBKMG142DL/Book: 72 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Achieving Environmental Excellence: An Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Handbook for Wastewater Utilities
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Global Environment and Technology Foundation

EMS is not a substitute for regulatory compliance. It is a system that enables a program/organization to perform above-minimal compliance and address environmental impacts that may not be regulated. Examples from several organizations and utilities are provided throughout this handbook to help guide the users in all phases of the EMS development process.

WWBKMG55DL/Book: 171pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Activated Carbon Treatment of Drinking Water Suppplies
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Activated carbon filters are used to remove unwanted tastes, odors, radon, and some man-made volatile organic contaminants from drinking water. This fact sheet describes the types of units that are available, their effectiveness, and other considerations to think about before buying a home water treatment system.

DWFSPE287DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Active and Effective Water Security Programs: A Summary Report of the National Drinking Water Advisory Council Recommendations on Water Security
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

A secure water sector is critical to protect public health and ensure public confidence. Utilities need to fully understand their specific local circumstances and conditions and develop a security program tailored to those conditions. This document provides a summary of the water security recommendations of the National Drinking Water Advisory Council.

DWBLMG127DL/Booklet: 12 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Adopt Your Watershed!
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

To encourage stewardship of the nation’s water resources and to celebrate 25 years of progress under the Clean Water Act, the EPA led an ‘Adopt Your Watershed’ campaign. This brochure highlights the watershed campaign, why it is needed, and how individuals and communities can make a difference. The brochure includes watershed resources available to almost all communities.

GNBRPE05DL/Brochure: 3pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Aeration Treatment of Drinking Water Supplies
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Aeration is effective against dissolved gases such as radon, carbon dioxide, some taste and odor problems, such as methane and hydrogen sulfide, as well as volatile organic compounds. It also can be used for precipitation and removal of iron and manganese. Lean how aeration works and about water treatment equipment that can be installed in the home.

DWFSPE292DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Aerobic Treatment Units: An Alternative to Septic Systems
National Environmental Services Center

This Pipeline issue is an update to the winter 1996 issue. The focus is on individual home aerobic units as an alternative for onsite wastewater treatment. How aerobic treatment works and the importance of routine maintenance are discussed.

SFPLNL42DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Aging Water Infrastructure Research Program: Addressing the Challenge Through Innovation
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

The Aging Water Infrastructure Research Program is a new effort by the EPA to generate the science and engineering needed to address our aging water network. This fact sheet describes the issues, details the current state of technology and introduces some of the new research being initiated by this program.

DWFSPE395DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Aging Water Infrastructure: Addressing the Challence Through Science and Innovation
Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

EPA's Clean Water and Drinking Water Infrastructure Sustainability Policy promotes sustainable infrastructure within the water sector. Making water infrastructure last longer, while increasing its cost-effectiveness and sustainability, and, therefore, help protect human health and the environment.

DWFSMG173DL/Fact Sheet: 6pp. (2011)

Price: $0.00
 
Aircraft Drinking Water Rule: A Quick Reference Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This is a quick reference guide on the aircraft drinking water rule contains an overview, major provisions, sampling plan as well as disinfection and flushing reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

DWFSRG132DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00


 
Aircraft Drinking Water Rule: A Quick Reference Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This document provides guidance related to the Public Notification Rule. It is designed for state primacy agencies for implementation of this rule.

DWBKRG135DL/Book: 120 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
All-Hazard Consequence Management Planning for the Water Sector
All-Hazard Consequence Management Planning for the Water Sector
CIPAC Working Group

The purpose of this document is to provide drinking water and wastewater utilities with planning recommendations derived from emergency management, mitigation planning, and emergency response resources. The goal is to help drinking water and wastewater utilities incorporate all-hazard consequence management concepts into their existing emergency preparedness, response, and recovery planning.

DWBKMG230DL/Book: 72pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Alternating Drainfields
National Environmental Services Center

The septic tank soil absorption system (ST-SAS) is the most conventional onsite system installed because it works well in varied situations and is normally the least expensive. Over time and with constant use, waste byproducts can form an impermeable layer within the soil absorptin system, thus not allowing water to continue moving down through the soils. This may cause backup of sewage into the home or to the surface above the absorption area. This technological overview describes the design and siting requirements for an alternating drainfield system to avoid the problem of backup. Having two soil absorbtion systems available for dispersal of the water, flow is alternated between systems. One system operates while the other rests. To further describe the use of alternating drainfields, this technical overview includes a case study conducted at Penn State University and detailed operation and maintenance practices.

SFBLTO01DL/Booklet: 8pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Alternative Dispersal Options
National Environmental Services Center

If a building site is not-quite-perfect, the homeowner may choose from a number of alternative systems. The Fall 2002 Pipeline explains why an alternative to the conventional septic system may be desirable. Several alternative onsite systems are discussed and illustrated, including the contour system, drip irrigation, gravelless and chamber systems, mound system/at grade, evapotranspiration, and a pressure/low pressure pipe system. Comparison of cost and non-cost factors of septic system alternatives is presented in table form. This information could be very helpful to the homeowner who seeks alternatives to the conventional septic system, and could be easily used as part of an overall educational program by community leaders, local officials, and public health officials.

SFPLNL31DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Alternative Household Cleaning Solutions
National Environmental Services Center

This fact sheet provides less-toxic alternatives for several cleaning and home improvement jobs around the house.

GNFSPE109DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Alternative Sewers: A Good Option for Many Communities
National Environmental Services Center

The Fall 1996 Pipeline presents various alternative sewer technologies and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Because they don’t require deep excavation, alternative sewers may be a more practical and economical choice for small communities and residential developments than conventional gravity sewers. The newsletter discusses technologies such as pressure sewers, septic tank effluent pump systems, grinder pumps, small diameter gravity sewers, and vacuum sewers.

SFPLNL07DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00


 
Alternative Toilets
National Environmental Services Center

Low-flow, incinerating, chemical, and composting toilets are discussed in this technical overview. Basic design and operation and maintenance techniques are presented along with the advantages and disadvantages of each alternative toilet system.

SFBLTO04DL/Booklet: 8pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Alternative Toilets Options for Conservation and Specific Site Conditions
National Environmental Services Center

The Summer 2000 Pipeline describes many types of alternative toilets that can be used in homes and public restroom facilities. The newsletter summarizes the operation, maintenance, advantages, and disadvantages of each type. Two case studies show how alternative toilet systems helped to resolve wastewater disposal problems.

SFPLNL22DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Alternative Wastewater Collection Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Office of Water

This manual contains design information for alternative collection systems, including pressure sewers, vacuum collection systems, and small-diameter gravity systems. It discusses system plans, elevation views, descriptions of on-lot system components, construction, operation and maintenance, management considerations, and cost data.

WWBKDM53DL/Book: 220pp. (1991)

Price: $0.00
 
Alternative Wastewater Treatment for Individual Lots
University of Rhode Island , Cooperative Extension Water Quality Program

There are many options and factors to consider when selecting the appropriate treatment system. This manual discusses real-world case studies where unique site constraints and specific treatment objectives were considered when selecting the appropriate system. Advanced treatment technologies for each of these case studies were selected to protect coastal waters, groundwater supplies, or support pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods where conventional systems were not feasible or would have required widespread and expensive site disturbance.

WWBLCS28DL/Booklet: 22 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Alternatives to Gravel Drainfields
National Environmental Services Center

This issue of Pipeline investigates the use of crushed glass, broken concrete, and rubber tire chips to reduce gravel in areas where the supply of gravel has become scarce or expensive to use as the media in soil absorption systems. Gravelless and chamber systems as additional options are also presented.

SFPLNL41DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Answers to your Questions about Groundwater
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Drinking Water and Groundwater

Groundwater, the supply of fresh water located beneath the earth's surface, is a major source of drinking water. This brochure answers questions about groundwater contamination and private wells and offers suggestions for how to protect the groundwater around your community.

DWBLPE124DL/Booklet: 16pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Answers to Your Questions on Well Abandonment
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Drinking Water and Groundwater

Unused and improperly abandoned wells are a significant threat to groundwater quality. This illustrated booklet explains the threats imposed by abandoned wells, steps to take and materials to use to properly close and fill wells when they are no longer in service, who can perform the work, and what administrative procedures should be followed to complete the process.

DWBLPE130DL/Booklet: 8 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Answers to Your Questions on Well Filling and Sealing
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resource, Bureau of Drinking Water and Groundwater

Water passing through improperly filled wells will not undergo the natural treatment that occurs when it passes through natural soil formations. This document explains when and how to properly abandon wells and suggests various materials that can be used to fill wells. Sources of information are included.

DWBLPE158DL/Booklet: 8 pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00


 
Antibacterial Products in Septic Systems
The University of Arizona, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cooperative Extension

To attain proper treatment, a septic system is dependent on millions of naturally occurring bacteria throughout the system. The use of antibacterial products, such as bleach and hand soaps, can upset the bacterial balance if used in excess. In this fact sheet, types of bacteria and their function are discussed as well as tips on proper cleansers to improve septic system performance.

WWFSPE86DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00
Appalachian Plateaus Groundwater Availability
Appalachian Plateaus Groundwater Availability
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey has been conducting an assessment of groundwater availability throughout the country to better understand this resource. In this info sheet, USGS describes their findings for the 86,00-square-mile Appalachian Plateau, which includes portions of Alabama, Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.

DWFSGN91DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2014)

Price: $0.00


 
Application of a Risk-Based Approach to Community Wastewater Management: Tisbury, Massachusetts
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

The Town of Tisbury, Massachusetts is situated south of Cape Cod on the island of Martha's Vineyard. It provides an example of decentralized wastewater management in progress in a coastal island community with nutrient-sensitive resources, a sole source aquifer (only one aquifer available for drinking water), combined with growth concerns. The goals and key elements of their management program, coupled with the process the town has gone through, provide a case history for other communities to adapt to their own circumstances. This overview of the management program includes critical decision-making points, barriers to implementation, status of the implementation effort, and the next steps.

WWCDCS24DL/ Book: 119 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Application of Simulation-Optimization Methods for Management of Nitrate Loading to Ground Water From Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Systems near La Pine, Oregon
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a method to estimate the optimal loading of nitrate from decentralized wastewater treatment systems to an aquifer method utilizing a stimulation-optimization approach in which a nitrate fate and transport simulation model is linked to an optimization model. Using this method, maximum sustainable loading rates that meet constraints on groundwater discharge can be determined. This method enhances the value of a simulation model as a decision-support tool in developing performance-based standards for onsite systems that will protect the quality of groundwater resources. This method was demonstrated in conjunction with National Onsite Demonstration Project (NODP) in the community of La Pine, Oregon.

WWBKMG49DL/Book: 63pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


Are You a Smart Well Owner
Are You a Smart Well Owner
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

This tip sheet covers four steps to protect private well water: Step 1: learn about the source of the water and the type of well, Step 2: protect well water by maintaining the well, preventing backflow, and siting and constructing a new well properly if one is needed, Step 3: have the water tested for recommended contaminants on a regular basis, and Step 4: seek expert advice regarding the test results. Some information is specific to Rhode Island but much of the content applies to all private well owners.

DWFSPE457DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2013)

Price: $0.00
 
Area Residents Keep Shelburne Beach Open Unnamed Tributary to Shelburne Beach, VT
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Bacteria leaking from residential septic systems caused the level of E. coli to exceed Vermont’s regulatory criteria for the bacteria in a tributary to Shelburne Beach, resulting in occasional beach closures. As a result, Vermont placed the one-mile unnamed tributary on its section 303(d) list for E. coli in 1998. The town of Shelburne identified the potential source of the bacteria, prompting improvements to?a number of residential septic systems along the stream. Subsequent monitoring data showed that the stream and beach consistently met water quality standards, and the tributary was removed from the state’s 303(d) list in 2004.

WWFSMG76DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Arsenic and Clarifications to Compliance and New Source Monitoring Rule: A Quick Reference Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

To improve public health, the U.S. EPA reduced the amount of arsenic allowed in public drinking water supplies. This "quick guide" fact sheet explains the changes to the arsenic rule, the public health benefits expected from the changes, critical deadlines, and compliance and monitoring requirements.

DWFSRG86DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Arsenic in Drinking Water
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Drinking Water & Groundwater

Arsenic is a natural part of our environment, and everyone is exposed to small amounts. This brochure discusses arsenic in its toxic and nontoxic forms and how it gets into water supplies, its health effects, testing to determine arsenic levels, and water treatment processes for its removal.

DWBRGN58DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Arsenic in Ground-Water Resources of the United States
U.S. Geological Survey

Recognized as a toxic element for centuries, arsenic is a health concern because it can contribute to skin, bladder, and other cancers. This fact sheet provides information on where and to what extent natural concentrations of arsenic in groundwater exceed current standards.

DWFSRG69DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Arsenic in Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Arsenic occurs naturally in the soil and bedrock throughout many parts of the U.S. Several types of home treatment systems are available for removing or reducing the amounty of arsenic in water. This fact sheet discusses potential health effects of arsenic poisoning, testing for its presence, and corrective actions to take to remove it from drinking water.

DWFSPE289DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Arsenic In Your Drinking Water
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water & Drinking Water

Arsenic is a toxic chemical element found in the Earth's crust in soil and rocks and can enter drinking water through the ground or as runoff into surface water sources. This fact sheet gives consumers important information about this element and if they should be concerned about arsenic in their drinking water.

DWFSPE355DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Arsenic POU Demonstration Study for Development of a Centralized Management Plan
Penn State Harrisburg, Small Public Water Systems Technology Assistance Center

Point of use (POU) devices can often be the most cost effective technology for arsenic removal. This fact sheet reports the results of a demonstration study on the performance of nine POU adsorption devices installed in various residences in Mohrsville, PA. Recommendations for how to educate the public for successful POU management plans are included.

DWFSMG144DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media EPA Demonstration Project at Queen Anne's County, Maryland Six-Month Evaluation Report
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Water Supply and Water Resources Division

To help small community water systems meet the new arsenic standard, EPA is conducting multiple demonstration projects to study various removal technologies. This report presents the test data from the 12 different systems.

DWCDDM24DL/Book: 59pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Bow, NH Six-Month Evaluation Report
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Labority, Water Supply and Water Resources Division

In 1975, under the SDWA, the EPA established a maximum contaminant level for arsenic in public water supply systems. To evaluate the effectiveness of the ADI Group's G2 media in removing arsenic, a demonstration project was installed at the White Rock Water Company public water system, a small residential drinking water facility in Bow, NH. This document provides the conclusion from the first six months of system operation.

DWBLMG84DL/Book: 60 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Dummerston, VT Six-Month Evaluation Report
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Water Supply and Water Resources Division

This EPA report presents the results of a Vermont study designed to evaluate the effectiveness of removing arsenic using adsorptive media systems, determine the required system O&M and operator skill levels, characterize process residuals produced, and determine the capital and O&M costs. This report summarized the performance of the ATS system at Dummerston, VT during the first six months of operation.

DWCDDM26DL/Book: 62 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Ion Exchange U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Fruitland, ID; Six-Month Evaluation Report
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Water Supply and Water Resources Division

This EPA report presents the results of a Idaho study designed to evaluate the effectiveness of removing arsenic using adsorptive media systems, determine the required system O&M and operator skill levels, characterize process residuals produced, and determine the capital and O&M costs. This report summarized the performance of a Kinetico IX system at Fruitland, ID during the first six months of operation.

DWCDDM25DL/Book: 81pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal Plants
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

In light of the decrease in permissible arsenic levels in drinking water, studies have been conducted at numerous treatment plants to determine the effectiveness of different arsenic removal processes. This report evaluates the outcome of arsenic removal studies at two iron removal plants. The study was divided into three phases: source water sampling, preliminary sampling, and long-term evaluation. Chemical characteristics of residuals produced by the treatment processes are also recorded.

DWBKOM33DL/Book: 75 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal US EPA Demonstration Project at Climax, MN Six-Month Evaluation Report
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Water Supply and Water Resources Division

In October 2001, EPA announced an initiative for additional research and development of cost-effective technologies to help small community water systems meet the new arsenic standard, and to provide technical assistance to operators of small systems in order to reduce compliance costs. To help determine the most cost-effective means of arsenic removal, the EPA funded 12 demonstration systems using various technologies. This report presents the findings from these various demonstration projects and the different technologies.

DWCDCS01DL/Book: 58pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Arsenic Rule Implementation Guidance for Maryland Public Water Systems
Maryland Department of the Environment, Water Supply Program

On January 23, 2001, the EPA finalized the arsenic rule. All community and nontransient noncommunity water systems were required to comply with this new standard by 1/23/06. This booklet was developed to help public water systems to comply with the new standards. Compliance requirements and compliance options are described. Also included is information about arsenic waste disposal and funding and technical resources for small community systems.

DWBLPE321DL/Booklet: 19 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Arsenic Rule Planning and Monitoring Worksheets ( To be used with USEPA's Complying With the Revised Dinking Water Standard for Arsenic: Small Entity Compliance Guide)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

As a drinking water provider, your most important job is protecting the health of your customers. These worksheets, intended for use with the EPA’s Complying With the Revised Drinking Water Standard for Arsenic: Small Entity Compliance Guide, help community water system and non-transient non-community water system operators record the correct number of samples for each sampling period, report monitoring results on time, and collect appropriate confirmation samples as mandated by the 2001 Arsenic Rule.

DWBLRG96DL/Booklet: 22 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Arsenic Treatment Technology Evaluation Handbook for Small Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

In January 2001, EPA published a final Arsenic Rule setting a revised maximum contaminant level for arsenic at 0.010 milligrams per liter. This handbook is intended to help small drinking water systems make treatment decisions that comply with the revised rule. Included is a checklist of activities that should normally take place in order to make compliance an easier process.

DWBKOM66/Book: 151 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
Arsenic Treatment Technology Showcase
Arsenic Treatment Technology Showcase
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This download contains an introduction to treating drinking water for arsenic. Several technologies are presented including adsorptive media, iron removal, ion exchange and coagulation and filtration. Point of Use and Point of Entry Devices are also discussed.

DWCDMG91DL/Video: 0 pp. (2005)

*** For video downloading and viewing instructions, please use this link

Price: $0.00


 
Assessing Ground-Water Vulnerability to Contamination: Providing Scientifically Defensible Information for Decision Makers
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey

This manual describes methods of assessing groundwater vulnerability to meet the needs of water resource managers, regulators, and policy makers. It also shows groundwater movements, the source of contaminants and the how they enter and flow through groundwater flow. Examples of successful groundwater vulnerability assessments are included in this manual.

DWBLRE31DL/Booklet: 39pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
Assessing Nonpoint Groundwater Contamination: Florida Caves
Assessing Nonpoint Groundwater Contamination: Florida Caves
Can Denizen

The Florida aquifer is a major source of potable water. Karst aquifers, such as this, are susceptible to contamination from nonpoint sources, including agriculture, recreation areas, and urbanization. In this study, 19 caves in northwest Florida were assessed for their susceptibility to nonpoint contamination sources.

DWBLPE449DL/Booklet: 22 pp. (2013)

Price: $0.00


 
Assessing the Risk of Groundwater Contamination from Drinking Water Well Condition
Vermont Natural Resources Conservation Districts

About 95 percent of this country’s rural residents use groundwater for their drinking water and farmstead needs. Wells are designed to provide clean water, but must be properly constructed and maintained to avoid contamination. This worksheet will take you step by step through your drinking water well condition and management practices.

DWFSPE338DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
Assessing Your Septic System
The University of Tennessee, Agricultural Extension Service

This fact sheet provides information for septic system owners who want to care for their septic systems and protect groundwater supplies. The fact sheet includes a check list to help system owners learn more about how their system works and its maintenance needs. It also explains why it's important to take care of a septic system and the consequences of neglecting it.

WWFSPE127DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00


 
Assessment of Single-Stage Trickling Filter Nitrification
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This report compares wastewater technologies that achieve nitrification, such as trickling filters. Information was collected from the EPA regional and state offices, literature, and wastewater treatment plant personnel. This report evaluates nitrification in single-stage and separate-stage trickling filters and offers conclusions and recommendations for each. Performance data from selected treatment plants that use trickling filters are included in this report.

WWBKRE32DL/Book: 105pp. (1991)

Price: $0.00
Assessment of surface water chloride and conductivity trends in areas of unconventional oil and gas development—Why existing national data sets cannot tell us what we would like to know
Assessment of surface water chloride and conductivity trends in areas of unconventional oil and gas development—Why existing national data sets cannot tell us what we would like to know
AGU Publications, Water Resources Research

Heightened concern regarding the potential effects of unconventional oil and gas development on regional water quality has emerged, but the few studies on this topic are limited in geographic scope. This factsheet discusses the potential utility of national and publicly available water-quality data sets for addressing questions regarding unconventional oil and gas development. U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data sets were used to increase understanding of the spatial distribution of unconventional oil and gas development in the U.S. and broadly assess surface water quality trends in these areas.

DWBLMG231DL/Booklet: 12 pp. (2014)

Price: $0.00


 
Asset Management for Local Officials
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet will help you understand the basics of asset management and the role that local officials play in successfully implementing an asset management program. The EPA produced this pamphlet to answer questions that local officials may have when starting up an asset management plan for their water system.

DWFSMG129DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Asset Management for Sewer Collection Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wastewater Management

Asset management is a way to oversee capital assets in an effective and cost-saving fashion. Long practiced by larger utilities, this fact sheet shows how smaller wastewater systems can implement an asset management plan, including the various components in the process.

WWFSMG66DL/Fact Sheet: 16 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Asset Management: A Handbook for Small Water Systems - One of the Simple Tools for Effective Performance (STEP) Guide Series
U.S. Environmental Protection Agnecy, Office of Water

Asset management is a planning process that ensures that a system gets the most value from the equipment, machinery, and other resources used in the operation of the facility. This handbook helps system managers maximize their resources through inventory, prioritizing, planning, and budgeting processes using specific worksheets for each.

DWBLMG54DL/Book: 50 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Asset Management: A Best Practices Guide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Asset management is defined as maintaining a desired level of service for the lowest cost. Understanding the best management practices of asset management are crucial to a water utility's future. This pamphlet explains how asset management helps water systems overcome their management challenges.

DWFSMG121DL/Fact Sheet: 5 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00


 
Atrazine
Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division of Environmental Quality, Public Drinking Water Program

Atrazine is one of the most widely used agricultural pesticides in the U.S. This factsheet describes atrizine, its potential adverse health effects, its fate in the environment, and what steps the U.S. EPA has taken to protect public health. It specifically discusses atrizine’s presence in drinking water in Missouri.

DWFSPE188DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00
 
Bacteria in Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Private well owners are responsible for the quality of their drinking water. Bacterial contamination cannot be detected by sight, smell, or taste. This fact sheet discusses health effects due to the presence of bacteria, where they come from, testing of private well water, and disinfection treatment to correct problems.

DWFSPE291DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Bacteria in Your Water : What You Need to Know
National Groundwater Association

Private well owners control their own water supply. With this benefit comes responsibility. This fact sheet briefly outlines bacterial contamination problems in well water and suggests actions to take to correct them.

DWFSPE265DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
Bacteriological Contamination of Drinking Water
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Drinking Water and Groundwater

Wells can become contaminated a number of ways. This illustrated fact sheet lists several of them, plus gives an overview of testing, tells how to locate possible contamination sources, and describes the means of disinfecting home water supplies.

DWFSPE140DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Baseline Information on Small Community Wastewater Needs and Financial Assistance
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

In 1997, the EPA Office of Wastewater, Municipal Support Division formed the Small Underserved Communities Team. The team developed baseline information about small community wastewater treatment needs and determined the level of financial assistance provided to date. The team’s data analysis showed that although considerable effort has been made to address the wastewater needs of small communities–significant needs remain. This fact sheet summarizes the team’s findings and lists resources for further information.

WWFSFN36DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Basic Wastewater Characteristics
National Environmental Services Center

The Fall 1997 Pipeline features basic information about wastewater components and characteristics. Wastewater temperature, flow, and pH are discussed. This newsletter highlights a California resort that dramatically reduced the amount of wastewater it generated by implementing water conservation methods.

SFPLNL11DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00


 
Benefits of Protecting Your Community From Sanitary Sewer Overflows
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This pamphlet highlights the dangers associated with sanitary sewer overflows, what actions some communities have taken to prevent these overflows from occurring, and where you can go for more information.

WWBLPE104DL/Booklet: 8pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Benefits of Water and Wastewater Infrastructure
National Environmnetal Services Center

This report explains how the health and well-being of the American public, as well as the environment, economy, and future, depend on continued support and funding of water and wastewater infrastructure. Through a review of other literature, this report briefly shows the necessity of having the federal government continue to support water and wastewater infrastructure.

DWBLRE06DL/Booklet: 15 pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00


Beryllium in Drinking Water Wells
Beryllium in Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

This tip sheet discusses health problems caused by high concentrations of beryllium in private well water. It also covers how beryllium gets into well water, areas of Rhode Island that have high levels, the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) for beryllium, and how to treat beryllium contaminated well water. Some of the content is specific to Rhode Island but much of it is applicable to any areas that may potentially have problems with beryllium contamination.

DWFSPE454DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2013)

Price: $0.00
 
Best Management Practices for Private Water Systems: A Guide to Proper Maintenance of Private Water Wells
Penn State University, College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

Improperly constructed or poorly maintained wells can create a pathway for pollutants into your home drinking water. This brochure has information about proper well maintenance, the best line of defense against a polluted water source.

DWBRPE267DL/Brochure: 2pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


Best Practices Factsheet: Consumer Confidence Report
Best Practices Factsheet: Consumer Confidence Report
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet is intended to help community water systems (CWS) design Consumer Confidence Reports (CCR) that better educate customers about their drinking water. It contains recommended best practices regarding the design, look and information in a CCR (Part 1). It also includes tips for successful CCR electronic delivery (Part 2). Better designed CCRs delivered in the way a customer prefers shows a CWS’s commitment to both public health and the public's right-to-know. A well-designed CCR can help a CWS educate its customers about this essential service and promote involvement in protecting their drinking water.

DWBLMG235DL/Booklet: 7pp. (2015)

Price: $0.00
 
Better Homes & Groundwater
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

Homeowners need to be groundwater smart. The suggestions in this booklet for lawn and garden care, household chemical use and disposal, and well and septic system maintenance can help keep pollutants from entering streams, lakes, and rivers.

DWBLPE129DL/Booklet: 24 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Beyond SRF: A Workbook for Financing CCMP Implementation
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This workbook introduces state, tribal, and local officials to potential approaches for financing various aspects of coastal protection. The workbook focuses explicitly on financing actions developed under the National Estuary Program, including developing Comprehensive Conser-vation and Management Plans (CCMP). The workbook describes key decision points in the public financing process, highlighting critical issues likely to affect market access and the cost of borrowing funds. It identifies techniques to mitigate potential impacts; approaches for obtaining private funding for CCMP-type environmental infrastructure; and approaches for funding growth management, conservation, and restoration measures.

FMBKFN22DL/Book: 70 pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00
 
Biological Filtration
National Environmental Services Center

This technical overview focuses on bilogical filtration as an onsite wastewater treatment option. A biofilter, short for biological filter, is a secondary treatment process. Primary treatment comes after and usually involves biological treatment. Filtration is one of the more common secondary treatment processes. Filters are commonly constructed using sand, gravel, peat or synthetic materials such as, foam, fabric, textile, or plastic. Biological treatment is a natural process, where bacteria living in the wastewater or in the environment consume organic contaminants in the waste stream. The basic idea of a filter is to provide a place for the bacteria to atach to while they eat the contaminants in the effluent that passes by. Bilofilters, using foam, plastic, textile, or peat provide a high ratio of surface area to volume so the mechanism can support a large amount of bacterial growth while still allowing water to filter past. The differences in using a biofilter is mainly cost and maintenance. However, all of these systems provide effective pretreatment of residential wastewater, allowing it to be dispersed onsite, even with tight or low-impermeable soils.

SFBLTO02DL/Booklet: 8pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Biological Nutrient Removal Project: Demonstrating Practical Tools For Watershed Management Through the National Estuary Program
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet contains information concerning a complex system of the Long Island Sound's circulation patterns and bottom topography which obscures the impact of discharges creating excessive levels of nirtogen. Excessive levels of nitrogen from point and nonpoint sources have contributed to a decrease in the amount of available oxygen in the Long Island Sound. Therefore, it became necessary to search for new, cost-effective techniques for removing nitrogen from the waste stream. Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) technology was tested at two sewage treatment plants that discharge directly into the Sound.

WWFSMG30DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00
 
Biosolids and Residuals Management Fact Sheet: Odor Control in Biosolids Management
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet provides information on controlling odors from biosolids production facilities, and how to prevent odors during the storage, distribution, and application of biosolids. It includes an overview of odor control alternatives and their advantages and disadvantages. Data tables summarize reported odor removal efficiencies and relative costs of odor control technologies. The fact sheet provides an overview for decision makers and is not intended to be design guidance.

WWFSGN167DL/Fact Sheet: 16 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Biosolids Management Handbook for Small Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wastewater Management

This handbook helps small publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) maintain compliance under the 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 503 standards for using and disposing of sewage sludge. These regulations establish operating practices for land application, surface disposal, and incineration. The handbook also describes techniques for reducing pathogen and vector attraction and discusses selecting a contract laboratory. Most of the material relates to requirements for land application.

Price: $0.00
 
Biosolids Recycling: Beneficial Technology for a Better Environment
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The booklet discusses EPA's policy encouraging the beneficial use of biosolids and important aspects of its new regulation (40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 503) that govern the final use or disposal of biosolids. It concludes with a discussion of the scientific basis for the rule. The booklet provides contacts for additional information regarding the rule and risk assessment.

WWBLGN59DL/Booklet: 35 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00


 
Biosolids Technology Fact Sheet: Alkaline Stabilization of Biosolids
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Biosolids are organic materials produced during wastewater treatment that are often rich in nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorous, and contain valuable micronutrients. The EPA requires that wastewater solids be processed before they can be beneficially used, a process known as stabilization wherein alkaline materials are added to raise the pH level to make conditions unfavorable for the growth of organisms (such as pathogens). This fact sheet describes the stabilization process, its applicability, advantages and disadvantages, design criteria, performance, operation and maintenance, and costs. The fact sheet includes a flow diagram of typical alkaline stabilization operation and data tables of typical design criteria for Class B alkaline stabilization and representative lime stabilization facilities.

WWFSGN202DL/Fact Sheet: 9 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Biosolids Technology Fact Sheet: Belt Filter Press
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Belt filter presses are used to remove water from liquid wastewater residuals and produce a nonliquid material referred to as 'cake.' This fact sheet explains the purposes of dewatering and how the belt filter press removes water from wastewater. The fact sheet discusses applicability, advantages and disadvantages, design criteria, performance, operation and maintenance, and costs. Figures include a schematic of a belt filter press and a photograph of a dewatered solids cake dropping from a belt filter press after processing. A table presents typical data for various types of sludge dewatered on belt filter presses.

WWFSGN203DL/Fact Sheet: 7 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Biosolids Technology Fact Sheet: Centrifuge Thickening and Dewatering
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Centrifugal thickening and dewatering is a high-speed process that uses the force from rapid rotation of a cylindrical bowl to separate wastewater solids from liquids. This fact sheet examines this method of wastewater treatment, its applicability, advantages and disadvantages, design criteria, performance, operation and maintenance, and costs. A typical centrifuge thickening and dewatering system is illustrated, and the range of expected centrifuge performance is presented in a data table.

WWFSGN201DL/Fact Sheet: 8 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Biosolids Technology Fact Sheet: In-Vessel Composting of Biosolids
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Biosolids are organic materials produced during wastewater treatment that are rich in nutrients and can have beneficial use in composting. Composting stabilizes wastewater solids prior to their use as a soil amendment or mulch in landscaping, horticulture, and agriculture. This fact sheet describes the general methods of biosolids composting, EPA performance standards, and various types of systems. The fact sheet discusses applicability, advantages and disadvantages, design criteria, performance, operation and maintenance, and costs. A flow diagram of a typical in-vessel composting facility is included, along with a data table relating federal maximum allowable metal concentrations.

WWFSGN200DL/Fact Sheet: 9 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Biosolids Technology Fact Sheet: Land Application of Biosolids
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Biosolids are organic materials produced during wastewater treatment that can have beneficial use, for example, supplying nutrients to soil or replenishing soil organic matter. This fact sheet describes land application of biosolids, including advantages and disadvantages, environmental impacts, design criteria for land application systems, performance, operation and maintenance, and costs. Photographs of biosolids injection equipment and application of liquid biosolids to forest land supplement the text. Data tables summarize maximum metal concentrations and typical biosolids application scenarios.

WWFSGN169DL/Fact Sheet: 9 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Biosolids Technology Fact Sheet: Recessed-Plate Filter Press
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Recessed-plate filter presses are used to remove water from liquid wastewater residuals and produce a non-liquid material referred to as 'cake.' Dewatered cake varies in consistency and is used to reduce volume, pooling, or runoff, or to optimize alkaline stabilization processes, among other uses. Recessed-plate filters are more commonly used in industrial applications than in municipal wastewater facilities. This fact sheet describes how filter presses work, their applicability, advantages and disadvantages, performance, operation and maintenance, and costs. An illustration of the recessed-plate filter press and a data table of the performance for various types of domestic wastewater solids supplement the text.

WWFSGN168DL/Fact Sheet: 7 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


Boil Water Advisories
Boil Water Advisories
State of New Hampshire, Department of Environmental Services

The possible presence of microbiological pathogens in drinking water supplies is a significant concern in the protection of public health. This fact sheet discusses how to minimize the risk of contaminants by issuing boil water advisories. The notice generally advises that all water that is used for consumption should be brought to and kept at a vigorous boil for not less than two minutes. Such advisories may be issued for the following reasons.

DWFSPE446DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00
 
Boil Water Notices: Questions and Answers
Minnesota Department of Health, Division of Environmental Health

If fecal coliform or E.Coli bacteria are detected in a water sample, the water supplier will issue a "Boil Order" notice. This fact sheet presents answers to many of the most common questions that residents may have about a Boil Water Notice.

DWFSGN79DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00


 
Border 2012 Accomplishments Report (2010-2012) U.S.-Mexico Environmental Program
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The Border 2012 Environmental Program has become a model for bi-national programs set on improving conditions on the U.S.-Mexico border. The program uses a community-based approach that focuses on the environmental needs of the people who live and work there. This booklet discuses border projects, including scrap tire removals, watershed cleanups, air quality monitoring, stormwater harvesting, soil sampling, and community health worker training.

DWBLPE443DL/Booklet: 28pp. (2012)

Price: $0.00
 
Bottled Water: Helpful Facts and Information
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Intended for the general public, this brochure describes how the Food and Drug Administration regulates the bottled water industry. It contains helpful hints about using bottled water with, or in place of, public or private water supplies.

DWBRPE04DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (1990)

Price: $0.00


 
Bottled Water: Questions and Answers
Minnesota Department of Heatlh, Health Risk Assessment Unit and Drinking Water Protection Section

Is bottled water safer than tap water? Where does bottled water come from? Are plastic water bottles safe to reuse? These questions and others are answered in this fact sheet.

DWFSGN80DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
Bridging the Gap: Coordination between State Primacy Agencies and State Emergency Management Agencies
Bridging the Gap: Coordination between State Primacy Agencies and State Emergency Management Agencies
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Water is essential for life. Manmade and natural disasters can significantly impact drinking water utility operations that, in turn, can affect the ability of a community to recover and resume normal life. When the severity or duration of disasters exceeds the ability of a water utility to respond and/or recover, often, they will turn to their state drinking water programs for support and assistance. This fact sheet discusses the statutory responsibilities that state drinking water agencies (or state primacy agencies) have to ensure that public water supplies meet all national primary drinking water regulations to achieve the goal of public health protection.

DWBLMG227DL/Fact Sheet: 8pp. (2013)

Price: $0.00


 
Building An Asset Management Team
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Asset management requires an investment of time and resources and having a strong management team will assure your water system of success. This fact sheet describes the responsibilities and roles of the key members of the team.

DWFSFN45DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Bulletin 1780-2: Preliminary Engineering Reports for the Water and Waste Disposal Program
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rural Utilities Service

This Bulletin provides information and guidance for applicants and professional consultants in developing a preliminary engineering report (PER) for submittal with an application for funding. A PER is a planning document required by many state and federal funding agencies as part of the process of obtaining financial assistance for development of drinking water, wastewater, solid waste, and stormwater facilities. This bulletin outlines the requirements that funding agencies have adopted when a PER is required. In general the PER should include a description of existing facilities and a description of the issues being addressed by the proposed project. It should identify alternatives, present a life cycle cost analysis of technically feasible alternatives and propose a specific course of action. The PER should also include a detailed current cost estimate of the recommended alternative.

DWBLMG211DL/Booklet: 22 pp. (2013)

Price: $0.00

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