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Baseline Information on Small Community Wastewater Needs and Financial Assistance
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

In 1997, the EPA Office of Wastewater, Municipal Support Division formed the Small Underserved Communities Team. The team developed baseline information about small community wastewater treatment needs and determined the level of financial assistance provided to date. The team’s data analysis showed that although considerable effort has been made to address the wastewater needs of small communities–significant needs remain. This fact sheet summarizes the team’s findings and lists resources for further information.

WWFSFN36DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Beyond SRF: A Workbook for Financing CCMP Implementation
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This workbook introduces state, tribal, and local officials to potential approaches for financing various aspects of coastal protection. The workbook focuses explicitly on financing actions developed under the National Estuary Program, including developing Comprehensive Conser-vation and Management Plans (CCMP). The workbook describes key decision points in the public financing process, highlighting critical issues likely to affect market access and the cost of borrowing funds. It identifies techniques to mitigate potential impacts; approaches for obtaining private funding for CCMP-type environmental infrastructure; and approaches for funding growth management, conservation, and restoration measures.

FMBKFN22DL/Book: 70 pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00


 
Clean Water State Revolving Fund Funding Framework
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet explains federal policy on nonpoint source and estuary projects' eligibility for state revolving fund (SRF) assistance to enhance the process for making future eligibility decisions at the state level. This booklet can help states establish relative priorities for using SRF funds to correct water quality problems on a statewide or watershed basis. This booklet discusses selecting "nontraditional" projects, establishing voluntary guidelines for funding traditional SRF projects, and setting national policy for states that wish to use their SRF to fund innovative projects.

FMBLFN25DL/Booklet: 16 pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00
 
Cleaning Up Polluted Runoff with the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet discusses the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) created to address water quality projects including nonpoint sources, wetlands, estuaries, watersheds, as well as more traditional wastewater treatment systems. The 51 SRF programs issue approximately $4 billion in loans annually. CWSRFs have an excess of $42 billion in assets. This fact sheet describes how a loan may be better for a community than a grant because cash is not required upfront, cost savings, and fewer federal requirements. Eligible recipients, including communities, individuals citizen groups, and nonprofit organizations are listed.

FMFSFN30DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Developing Public-Private Partnerships: An Option for Wastewater Financing
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

As an introductory document, this booklet presents background information about how public-private partnerships (P3) can finance the construction and expansion of wastewater treatment facilities. It outlines the steps necessary to move toward P3 financing and addresses issues about structuring a successful partnership agreement.

FMBLPP06DL/Booklet: 15pp. (1992)

Price: $0.00
 
Environmental Management Resources for Indian Tribes
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Enforcement and Compliance

One of the USEPA’s directives is to prorect human health and the environment in Indian Country. This document serves as a reference for information about resources that specifically address tribal environmental issues. This document describes approximately 170 environmental resources including books, newsletters, fact sheets, databases, sources of financial assistance, training workshops and course material and assistance organizations. Entries are sorted by environmental categories, including air, water, waste, toxics, etc.

FMBKGN274DL/Book: 134pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Federal Funding Sources for Small Community Wastewater Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet highlights 10 federal programs that help state, tribal, and local officials identify possible funding sources. Information about who to contact and how to apply is included. While this publication describes some drinking water programs, it focuses mainly on wastewater.

FMBLFN29DL/Booklet: 34pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
Financing Models for Environmental Protection: Helping Communities Meet Their Environmental Goals
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Administration and Resources Management

Illustrating the successes of EPA's Public-Private Partnerships (P3) Demonstration Program, this book provides an array of financing models that can serve as prototypes for local governments planning and implementing environmental programs. The book offers case studies about how these models are used for individual projects. The book includes contacts from EPA's P3 demonstration projects and other sources to guide communities in meeting their environmental needs. It shares lessons learned by local governments who implemented these models.

FMBKFN18DL/Book: 99 pp. (1992)

Price: $0.00


 
Funding Decentralized Wastewater Systems Using the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) is a low-interest or no-interest source of funding for the installation, repair or upgrade of decentralized wastewater systems in rural or suburban areas. The pamphlet describes how these funds work and how to obtain these funds for your town.

WWFSFN47DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
Funding Decentralized Wastewater Systems Using the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) is a low-interest or no-interest funding source for installing, repairing, and upgrading decentralized wastewater systems in small-town, rural, and suburban areas. This fact sheet discusses how the CWSRF operates, including eligible projects and who may qualify. Success stories from Ohio, Maine, Pennsylvania, and Minnesota describe how these states have used the CWSRF. Other funding sources for decentralized systems are summarized, including EPA 319 Grants, USDA Rural Utilities Service, Housing and Urban Development Community Development Block Grant, and non-federal assistance.

WWFSFN07DL/Fact Sheet: 6pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


Funding Nonpoint Source Activities with the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
Funding Nonpoint Source Activities with the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) programs have funded more than $40 billion in low interest loans through 2003‚ —averaging $4.1 billion over the past five years—for water quality protection projects including wastewater treatment, nonpoint source pollution control, and watershed and estuary management. This booklet discusses the CWSRF and how it has improved water quality across the nation.

WWBLFN48DL/Booklet: 24pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Funding of Small Community Needs Through the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet outlines the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (SRF) program, authorized by Title VI of the Clean Water Act (CWA) Amendments of 1987. Funding trends, including distribution of SRF dollars to small communities relative to total SRF funding from 1988-1998 are discussed. One figure illustrates the relationship between SRF agreements with small communities and total SRF agreements, while another figure shows the documented needs of small communities from the Clean Water Needs survey. A table contains CWSRF assistance in dollars and the number of agreements by community-size for fiscal years 1988-1998 for each state.

FMFSFN33DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Funding Water Conservation and Reuse with the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet discusses the Clean Water Act of 1987, which authorized the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) to finance point source, nonpoint source, and estuary projects. The programs work like banks, using federal and state contributions to capitalize or set up the programs. These assets, in turn are used to make low- or no-interest loans. Repaid funds are recycled to pay for other water quality projects. This fact sheet describes how the CWSRF works, how to fund a project, and the sources of loan repayments. Examples of successful projects are summarized.

FMFSFN35DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Future Investment in Drinking Water and Wastewater Infrastructure
The Congress of the United States, Congressional Budget Office

According to experts from the EPA and various nonfederal groups, the nation's drinking water and wastewater systems face increasing challenges over the next several decades in maintaining and replacing their pipes, treatment plants, and other infrastructure. But there is neither consensus on the size and timing of future investment costs nor agreement on the impact of those costs on households and other water ratepayers. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has analyzed those issues, and this study provides:

· background information on the nation's water systems,

· CBO's estimates of future costs for water infrastructure under two scenarios (a low-cost case and a high-cost case), and

· broad policy options for the federal government.

Keeping in mind the CBO's mandate to provide objective and impartial analysis, this report makes no recommendations. Three chapters in this study discuss drinking water and wastewater infrastructure, estimates of future investment costs and their implications, and options for federal policy. The appendices include information about the assumptions the CBO used in it low-cost and high-cost cases and major sources of efficiency savings. Figures and summary tables throughout the report illustrate statistical analyses.

FMBKFN40DL/Book: 75pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Guidance on the Privitization of Federally Funded Wastewater Treatment Works
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Although more than $20 billion in federal and state investments provided funding to communities for water pollution control infrastructure projects through the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (SRF) Program, local governments’ infrastructure needs are estimated to be approximately $200 billion. One funding approach to consider is public-private partnerships that have private sector resources to finance wastewater treatment needs. This book discusses the privatization of publicly owned wastewater treatment works that were financed through EPA’s Construction Grants Program, research and demonstration programs, and special Congressional appropriations. The book presents factors a local government should consider when evaluating privatization. It outlines what information local governments must gather for EPA’s review and approval of proposed disposition types of arrangements.

WWBKPP07DL/Book: 73pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Handbook on Coordinating Funding for Water and Wastewater Infrastructure: A Compilation of State Approaches
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This handbook compiles information on how six states - Arizona, California, Montana, New York, Pennsylvania, and Washington - identified the key to successfully coordinating dollars for improving drinking water and wastewater infrastructures. This handbook presents the lessons learned by these states to allow other states to better understand the benefits and challenges of coordinating funding efforts.

WWBKFN43DL/Book: 78pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Hardship Grants Program for Rural Communities
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet explains the Hardship Grants Program for Rural Communities, which the 1996 Congressional Appropriations Act created to help small, disadvantaged, rural communities address their wastewater treatment needs. The EPA makes grants to each state which then provides financial assistance to eligible rural communities for planning, designing, and constructing treatment facilitiesÑboth community and onsite. Assistance can include operation and maintenance training, technical assistance, and education. Eligibility criteria and sources of additional information are outlined.

FMFSFN27DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
It's Your Choice: A Guidebook for Local Officials on Small Community Wastewater Management Options
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Municipal Pollution Control

This book examines choices that small community officials have to solve their communities' current wastewater problems or to address future wastewater needs. It discusses the steps needed to define the problem, select a consulting engineer, and finance a system. The book identifies where to turn for help and how to make your wastewater system self-sustaining by setting up appropriate user fees.

FMBKGN01DL/Book: 83 pp. (1987)

Price: $0.00


 
Ohio's Restoration Sponsor Program Integrates Point Source & Nonpoint Source Projects
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This four-page fact sheet discusses the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency's Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program (WRRSP), and its successes. Communities in Ohio used $24 million in revolving loan fund money to restore 1,850 acres of riparian lands and wetlands as well as 38 miles of Ohio's stream corridors. WRRSP offers communities low interest loans for wastewater treatment projects and improvements if the communities also sponsor projects that protect and restore water resources.

WWFSFN44DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Reducing the Cost of Operating Municipal Wastewater Facilities
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Municipal Pollution Control

This pamphlet outlines ways wastewater facilities can identify high-cost problems and methods for cutting operating costs. This booklet discusses cost-reduction programs and ways to identify expensive areas and components.

WWBLFN39DL/Booklet: 4 pp. (1985)

Price: $0.00


 
Road to Financing: Assessing and Improving Your Community's Creditworthiness
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet defines creditworthiness and discusses funding criteria and methods for evaluating and strengthening a community’s financial health. A list of organizations that provide information about financial issues and a table of comparative municipal financial indicators are included.

FMBLFN17DL/Booklet: 20pp. (1992)

Price: $0.00
 
Rural Community Assistance Program (RCAP) Help for Small Community Wastewater Projects
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet describes RCAP, a national network of nonprofit organizations, and how they provide onsite technical assistance to help communities attain or maintain adequate wastewater treatment services. Through a partnership agreement with the EPA, RCAP assists with financing, managing, operating, and maintaining systems through the Small Community Wastewater Project. The project addresses community-specific wastewater compliance problems, particularly compliance with the Clean Water Act requirements. Also discussed is funding for small community wastewater projects and contact for more information is provided

WWFSFN32DL/Fact Sheet: 3pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
State Match Options for the State Revolving Fund Program
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Water

States that capitalize their state revolving funds (SRFs) through appropriations are rewarded over time with higher SRF funding levels. However, if a state is unable to provide funds directly to the SRF, other state match options are available. As conditions change, states may need to re-examine their approach to providing matching funds. Should states use bonds for match? Are there other viable match options? This report can help states to review state match options. The report evaluates seven state match options and each option's effect on the SRF over time. The match options presented also apply to the new Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Program established by the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments to 1996.

FMBLFN28DL/Booklet: 21 pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
The Clean Water State Revolving Fund Program
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet describes the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) program that finances a range of environmental projects. Under the program, the EPA provides grants or ‘seed money’ to capitalize state loan funds. The fact sheet discusses how states make loans to communities, individuals, and others for high-priority water-quality activities. As money is paid back into the revolving fund, the CWSRF makes new loans to other recipients that need help in maintaining water quality. Benefits, project eligibility, and the Clean Water Act are also discussed.

WWFSFN06DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
The Clean Water State Revolving Fund: How to Fund Nonpoint Source and Estuary Enhancement Projects
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wastewater Management

This booklet describes the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) program, a widely available financing source for water quality improvement projects established under the Clean Water Act of 1987. While the CWSRF is most commonly used to finance municipal wastewater treatment projects, this booklet answers frequently asked questions about the program’s ability to fund nonpoint source and estuary projects, key components to watershed-based water quality management. The EPA encourages the full use of the CWSRF to implement a broad range of watershed-based activities. The brochure provides examples of eligible or actual projects throughout the brochure to illustrate the CWSRF program’s potential for funding water quality activities.

WWBLFN01DL/Booklet: 20pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
USDA Loan and Grant Funding for Small Community Wastewater Projects
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet provides general information about the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service (RUS) Water and Waste Disposal Loans and Grants Program, which provides loans and grants for water, sewer, stormwater, and solid waste disposal facilities. The program assists only rural areas with 10,000 or fewer people. The booklet discusses how RUS funding compares to joint funding sources and to EPA total need.

FMBLFN34DL/Booklet: 8pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Use of the Clean Water State Revolving Fund to Implement Security Measures at Publicly-Owned Wastewater Treatment Works
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Clean Water State Revolving Fund Branch

The events of September 11, 2001 have given focus to the importance of safe wastewater treatment plants. Adequate protection of publicly owned treatment works and treatment systems has been an importance goal of the Environmental Protection Agency's wastewater program. States have submitted many questions about the eligibility of security measures for financial assistance through the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF). This fact sheet discusses the types of projects that may be fundable through the CWSRF which will help publicly-owned treatment works ensure the protection of their facilities. It also explains the CWSRF program, ways to ensure security, what security measures can be funded through the CWSRF, and where to find additional information.

WWFSFN42DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Utility Manager's Guide to Water and Wastewater Budgeting
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This booklet presents financial concepts to water or wastewater utility managers developing an annual budget. The booklet offers several sources of possible revenue, expenses to consider, suggestions about how to gain public support for the budget, and examples to help develop revenue and expense trends information.

FMBLFN13DL/Booklet: 26pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00


 
Wastewater Facilities: Experts' View on How Federal Funds Should Be Spent to Improve Security
U.S. Government Accountability Office

This Report to the Committee on the Environment and Public Works identified 50 recognized experts from the wastewater community and surveyed them on one or more key aspects of wastewater security. These expert opinions are presented in this document.

WWBKFN46DL/Book: 71pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Wastewater Primer
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This document provides information about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Wastewater Management programs that affect wastewater management, including National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits, storm water and overflows; biosolids and sludge; and pretreatment. The document also provides information about organizations and programs that offer financial and technical assistance to wastewater treatment managers.

FMBLFN45DL/Booklet: 16 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Wastewater Treatment Programs Available to Native Americans
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

According to a 1998 Indian Health Service report, many Native American homes lack adequate systems to treat or dispose of sewage. EPA’s Office of Wastewater Management provides financial and technical assistance programs and resource centers to aid Native Americans in constructing and operating wastewater facilities. This fact sheet provides contact information about assistance programs and other EPA partner organizations and agencies.

WWFSFN38DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Water Infrastructure: Information on Financing, Capital Planning, and Privatization
Congressional Budget Office, Congress of the United States

According to the EPA and water utility industry groups, communities will need an estimated $300 billion to $1 trillion over the next 20 years to repair, replace, or upgrade aging drinking water and wastewater facilities, accommodate a growing population, and meet new water quality standards. The respective ranking minority members of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works and its Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, and Water, asked the GAO to examine several issues relating to the funding available to help meet the capital investment needs of the nation’s drinking water and wastewater facilities. The GAO agreed to provide the information in two reports. The first report, issued in November 2001, addressed the amounts and sources of federal and state financial assistance for drinking water and wastewater infrastructure during fiscal years 1991 through 2000. This second report examines:

1) how funds obtained by large public and private drinking water and wastewater utilities—those serving populations greater than 10,000—through user charges and other local funding sources compare with their cost of providing service;

2) how such utilities manage existing capital assets and plan for needed capital improvements; and

3) what factors influence private companies' interest in assuming the operation or ownership of publicly owned drinking water and wastewater facilities.

The second report lists the principal findings of the GAO's investigation, which include the following:

• user charges and other local sources of funds covered much, but not all, of utilities' cost of providing service.

• many utilities lacked comprehensive asset management plans, but most had identified future capital needs.

• profit potential is a key factor in private companies' decisions to assume operation or ownership of utilities.

Appendices include the surveys of drinking water and wastewater utilities. The tables and figures delineate the statistical analysis of the survey results. The information in this report should be of interest to those wastewater professionals, local officials, planners, managers, state officials, public health officials, and finance officers whose work involves the either planning, maintaining, or financing a community's drinking water and wastewater infrastructure.

FMBKFN41DL/Book: 83 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Watershed Approach Framework
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This publication explains EPA's vision for watershed approaches, building on the Watershed Protection Approach Framework that senior EPA managers endorsed in 1991. Individual Office of Water programs place high priority on developing and supporting comprehensive state and tribal watershed approach strategies. The booklet emphasizes the role EPA envisions for states and tribes.

FMBLGN14DL/Booklet: 18 pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00
 


   
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