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2002-2003 National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project: Training, Research and Development Plan
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

The National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project (NDWRCDP) was formed in 1996 to coordinate and implement a national training, research, and development agenda in decentralized water resources. The priority for the first five years has been in decentralized wastewater management and this plan describes currently funded initiatives and the long-term agenda for decentralized wastewater management. It also discusses the conferences and workshops that were convened to solicit input and coordinate plan development.

WWBLMG17DL/Booklet: 23pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
A Drop of Knowledge: The Non-operator’s Guide to Wastewater Systems
National Environmental Services Center, Rural Community Assistance Partnership, Inc.

RCAP has developed this guide to provide an overview of all of the technical aspects of a wastewater system so non-technical audiences can better understand what is involved in wastewater treatment.

WWBKMG73DL/Book: 60pp. (2011)

Price: $0.00


 
A Status of Tools and Support for Community Decentralized Wastewater Solutions
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This report is the result of two 2002 workshops (organized by the Green Mountain Institute for Environmental Democracy and supported by the National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project.) The purpose of the workshops was to better understand the services and tools available to communities and how these tools and services can be improved. Experts in the application of decentralized solutions met with representatives of community projects that had already or were in the process of deciding on wastewater solutions. This report tries to identify situations where additional effort can strengthen the participation of communities in making wastewater decisions that apply managed decentralized solutions, when appropriate.

The first part of this report is structured to run through each of the steps in the community process that leads to the choice and implementation of wastewater solutions. These steps constitute a "community process." From the observations noted, the remainder of the report identifies key findings that provide the basis for the last section of conclusions.

WWBKMG21DL/Book: 77pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Achieving Environmental Excellence: An Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Handbook for Wastewater Utilities
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Global Environment and Technology Foundation

EMS is not a substitute for regulatory compliance. It is a system that enables a program/organization to perform above-minimal compliance and address environmental impacts that may not be regulated. Examples from several organizations and utilities are provided throughout this handbook to help guide the users in all phases of the EMS development process.

WWBKMG55DL/Book: 171pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Application of Simulation-Optimization Methods for Management of Nitrate Loading to Ground Water From Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Systems near La Pine, Oregon
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a method to estimate the optimal loading of nitrate from decentralized wastewater treatment systems to an aquifer method utilizing a stimulation-optimization approach in which a nitrate fate and transport simulation model is linked to an optimization model. Using this method, maximum sustainable loading rates that meet constraints on groundwater discharge can be determined. This method enhances the value of a simulation model as a decision-support tool in developing performance-based standards for onsite systems that will protect the quality of groundwater resources. This method was demonstrated in conjunction with National Onsite Demonstration Project (NODP) in the community of La Pine, Oregon.

WWBKMG49DL/Book: 63pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Area Residents Keep Shelburne Beach Open Unnamed Tributary to Shelburne Beach, VT
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Bacteria leaking from residential septic systems caused the level of E. coli to exceed Vermont’s regulatory criteria for the bacteria in a tributary to Shelburne Beach, resulting in occasional beach closures. As a result, Vermont placed the one-mile unnamed tributary on its section 303(d) list for E. coli in 1998. The town of Shelburne identified the potential source of the bacteria, prompting improvements to?a number of residential septic systems along the stream. Subsequent monitoring data showed that the stream and beach consistently met water quality standards, and the tributary was removed from the state’s 303(d) list in 2004.

WWFSMG76DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Asset Management for Sewer Collection Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wastewater Management

Asset management is a way to oversee capital assets in an effective and cost-saving fashion. Long practiced by larger utilities, this fact sheet shows how smaller wastewater systems can implement an asset management plan, including the various components in the process.

WWFSMG66DL/Fact Sheet: 16 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Biological Nutrient Removal Project: Demonstrating Practical Tools For Watershed Management Through the National Estuary Program
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet contains information concerning a complex system of the Long Island Sound's circulation patterns and bottom topography which obscures the impact of discharges creating excessive levels of nirtogen. Excessive levels of nitrogen from point and nonpoint sources have contributed to a decrease in the amount of available oxygen in the Long Island Sound. Therefore, it became necessary to search for new, cost-effective techniques for removing nitrogen from the waste stream. Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) technology was tested at two sewage treatment plants that discharge directly into the Sound.

WWFSMG30DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00


 
Buttermilk Bay Coliform Control Project: Demonstrating Practical Tools for Watershed Management Through the National Estuary Program
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Located at the north end of Buzzard's Bay, is Buttermilk Bay, a recreational, tidal embayment where many residents and visitors sun bathe, boat and fish. This fact sheet features the Buttermilk Bay Demonstration Project which was designed to control the discharge of fecal coliform into the bay. Project objectives included identifying sources of fecal coliform, employing Best Management Practices (BMPs) to control runoff, and implementing local regulations t control coliform. Results of the project are detailed along with several lessons learned during the implantation phases of the project.

WWFSMG28DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00
 
Buzzards Bay "SepTrack" Initiative: Demonstrating Practical Tools for Watershed Management Through the National Estuary Program
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Buzzard's Bay Watershed includes 432 square miles and a population of nearly 236,000. Approximately half the homes utilize onsite systems to treat wastewater. Problematic onsite systems have lead to the contamination of waters resulting in the closure of shellfish beds and other water-contact recreation activities. Local boards of health typically lack the ability to efficiently and effectively monitor septic system permits, inspection, and maintenance information due to insufficient staffing and information-processing equipment and systems.

The SepTrack Demonstration Project provided computers and specialized software to communities to allow them to better manage information related to onsite systems, thereby freeing staff time for better design review and enforcement and to identify patterns of failure. Success stories along with lessons learned from the project are included in this overview of the Buzzards Bay "SepTrack" Initiative. This product could be useful to anyone involved with the management of septic systems, local officials, public health officials, state regulatory agencies, managers, state officials and the general public.

WWFSMG29DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00


 
Cluster Wastewater Systems Planning Handbook
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This manual has two objectives. First, it outlines a comprehensive wastewater management planning process that allows communities to assess where and how cluster systems are appropriate, and thereby enabling the development of an optimized, decentralized wastewater management plan. Second, it provides technical and planning information to assist land use planners, engineers, developers, and other stakeholders in developing and implementing cluster wastewater systems.

WWBKMG33DL/Book: 174pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Combined Sewer Overflow Management Fact Sheet: Pollution Prevention
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet provides information about combined sewer overflows management with a focus on pollution prevention best management practices.

WWFSMG69DL/Fact Sheet: 9 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


Community Onsite Options and Approaches to Onsite Management Videos on DVD
Community Onsite Options and Approaches to Onsite Management Videos on DVD
National Environmental Services Center

This video discusses the need for an implementation of onsite management systems (OMS) in five communities. Wastewater professionals from each of the communities explain why their community instituted an OMS, the approach they took, how it is administered, and its benefits. Ongoing, competent maintenance, monitoring, and management are emphasized, as well as discussion of advanced treatment systems, such as aerobic treatment units, sand filters, and cluster systems.

DPDVMG56DL/17 Minute Video: 0 pp. (0)

*** For video downloading and viewing instructions, please use this link

Price: $0.00
 
Creative Community Design and Wastewater Management
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This manual demonstrates how advanced decentralized wastewater treatment systems can be used to support more compact land use patterns that would otherwise be infeasible with conventional wastewater treatment systems. The manual also informs how decentralized technologies can be powerful tools in directing sustainable community development while protecting local water resources. Developers, wastewater treatment system designers and installers, and homeowners will also find ideas on fitting septic systems into landscapes in ways that retain natural features and unique architectural elements of a community and add value to properties.

WWBKMG27DL/Book: 200pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Decentralized Wastewater System Reliability Analysis Handbook
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

Understanding how to improve the performance of decentralized systems is crucial to allocating the often scarce resources available for hardware and management. Developing a framework through which a practitioner may select appropriate asset management and reliability assessment tools represents the critical elements of the project. This handbook was developed to allow the results of this work to be easily incorporated into the decision-making communities, regulators, and the design community. Real-life examples and fictional case studies are interspersed throughout the document to assist the reader in further understanding the framework and tools.

WWBKMG46DL/Book: 183pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Emerging Technologies for Wastewater Treatment and In-Plant Wet Weather Management
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wastewater Management

This manual provides information about emerging wastewater treatment and in-plant wet weather management technologies. With respect to technologies, the manual is divided into four categories: (1) embryonic, (2) innovative, (3) established, and (4) innovative uses of established processes.

WWBKMG68DL/Book: 190 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00


 
Environmental Planning for Communities: A Guide to the Environmental Visioning Process Utilizing a Geographic Information System (GIS)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

As an essential step in community-based environmental protection, community leaders, residents, and planners develop an environmental vision of their preferred “green” community. One important tool to develop such a vision is the geographic information system (GIS) computer software. This book explains how communities can use GIS to produce maps, support scientific analysis, and depict environmental data in relation to the geography and capacity to model the landscape as it may evolve over time. The book provides introductory material for those unfamiliar with GIS and advanced material for more experienced GIS users.

GNBKMG13DL/Book: 58 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
EPA Guidelines for Management of Onsite/Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

How onsite and other decentralized wastewater treatment systems perform is a national issue of great concern. This U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) brochure discusses the guidelines for managing decentralized treatment systems. The brochure includes a detailed description of the guidelines, why they are needed, and it explains about their voluntary adoption. The brochure explains what the guidelines are, defines model management programs, and outlines the next steps for EPA. Wastewater professionals involved in following regulatory guidelines will be most interested in this information, but it is also useful and applicable to the general public.

WWFSMG19DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Evaluating Customer Response to Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Options
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This manual presents the results of a study conducted in 2000 designed to help the National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project (NDWRCDP) gauge user attitudes and preferences toward distributed wastewater treatment systems and management options. The study’s objectives include the following:

· Identify customer attitudes regarding water quality and the adequacy of their current septic systems, alternative wastewater solutions, and who has primary responsibility for wastewater issues.

· Identify the contextual factors affecting customer attitudes and preferences related to water quality and wastewater issues.

· Identify tradeoffs customers make between septic systems and connecting to sewer systems and their willingness to pay for third-party septic system management.

· Identify how different types of customers would make decisions about wastewater solutions differently.

Data from The Septic System Survey 2000, conducted by North Carolina State University, was analyzed to help address the research objectives.

Despite the lack of market penetration achieved by advanced wastewater treatment technologies and the current uncertainty regarding future adoption of these systems and of management and maintenance services, the survey analysis indicates there are future opportunities for decentralized wastewater treatment technologies and related services.

The study also identifies opportunities for future NDWRCDP research. This product will be of interest to public health officials, local officials, planners, researchers, state officials, and the state regulatory agencies

WWBKMG22DL/Book: 72pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Expanding Communication in Communities Addressing Wastewater Needs
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

The Green Mountain Institute for Environmental Democracy (GMI) completed a one-year project to improve the availability of information and tools for communities working toward a solution for their wastewater needs. The goals of the project were to help interested community members build motivation of others to participate in the project and to help build a project structure that identifies and describes the public process components necessary to move their project from planning to action. This document discusses the materials of the project and pilot tests the material in four communities. Each case study is presented in detail along with outcomes and recommendations.

WWCDMG48DL/Multiple Files: 53pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Fixing On-site Sewage Systems Restores Popular New Orleans Area Rivers
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

High bacteria counts in the Tchefuncte River and its tributary, the Bogue Falaya River, prompted the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) to add a segment of each water body to Louisiana’s 1992 Clean Water Act (CWA) section 303(d) list of impaired waters. LDEQ and the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation (LPBF) formed partnerships with St. Tammany Parish and surrounding communities to implement education and corrective programs. Bacteria counts decreased, and LDEQ removed both segments from the 2008 CWA section 303(d) list of impaired waters for fecal coliform.

WWFSMG79DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
From Problems to Solutions: Planning and Management of Onsite Wastewater Systems
National Association of Counties

A septic system (which is the most common type of onsite decentralized wastewater treatment system) is a self contained, underground wastewater treatment system. This booklet describes how to plan and manage to avoid problems and offers solutions for when problems do arise.

WWBLMG74DL/Booklet: 16pp.

Price: $0.00


 
Guidance Specifying Management Measures for Sources of Nonpoint Pollution in Coastal Waters
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This book contains guidance specifying management measures for sources of nonpoint pollution in coastal waters. It addresses five source categories of nonpoint pollution as well as a suite of management measures for each source category. In addition to this management measures guidance, EPA and NOAA have jointly published final guidance for the approval of state programs that implement management measures, explaining more fully how the management guidance will be implemented in state programs.

WWBKMG40DL/Book: 845 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Guiding Principles for Constructed Treatment Wetlands: Providing for Water Quality and Wildlife Habitat
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wetlands Oceans and Watersheds

The number of constructed treatment wetland projects receiving wastewater from municipal, industrial, agricultural and storm water sources has increased to more than 600 active projects across the U.S. This user guide promotes the development of environmentally beneficial constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment system by providing information on the legal, policy, and technical issues associated with these systems. It serves as a guide for those developing and managing constructed treatment wetlands. Information about the principles for planning, siting, design, construction, operation, maintenance, and monitoring of municipal wastewater treatment constructed weltands is provided as well as information on current EPA policies, permits, regulations, and resources. The user guide also includes commonly asked questions with answers, and the appendices offer definitions, references, and other helpful information.

WWBLMG31DL/Booklet: 25pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Handbook for Managing Onsite and Clustered (Decentralized) Wastewater Treatment Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Although decentralized systems offer many benefits, they are not without problems. Each community must carefully evaluate its situation and management needs to develop a management program that is supported by residents, protects public health and environment, and allows the community to grow and prosper. This booklet recommends the basic format for developing an effective onsite sewage management program based on the principles in EPA’s Voluntary National Guidelines for Managing Onsite and Clustered (Decentralized) Wastewater Treatment Systems.

WWBLMG57DL/Book: 66 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Homeowners and Agricultural Community Reduce Bacteria Levels in Oconee County Watersheds
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Livestock operations and failing septic systems caused excessive fecal coliform levels in two rural South Carolina creeks. In 1998 the state placed three sites along the Coneross and Beaverdam Creeks on its 303(d) list for violating bacterial indicator water quality standards. The three watersheds represented by these sites did not support recreational uses because of the bacterial impairment. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) developed total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) for fecal coliform for Beaverdam Creek and two sites within Coneross Creek. Public and private partners met these TMDLs by implementing several best management practices (BMPs) designed, in part, to help the creeks meet state water quality standards for fecal coliform. At the close of the project in December 2005, all three sites were meeting South Carolina’s water quality standards for fecal coliform.

WWFSMG77DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Hunters Point Shipyard Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Study
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission investigated various decentralized wastewater treatment technologies for use at Hunters Point Shipyard in San Francisco. The conclusion of this study, as well as important technical and cost information considered in the citywide Clean Water Master Plan, is discussed.

WWCDMG34DL/Multiple Files: 127pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Integrated Risk Assessment for Individual Onsite Wastewater Systems
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

The book illustrates a risk-based approach to decision-making for individual wastewater treatment (OWT) systems. This framework integrates four different interdependent types of risk analyses: engineering, public health, ecological, and socioeconomic. Researcher used the three stages of risk assessment to structure the framework: problem formation and a planning process; and analysis of site-specific exposure and effects; and risk characterization.

WWBKMG39DL/Book: 221 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Iowa Handbook for Enabling Legal Mechanisms for Wastewater Management
National Environmental Services Center

This handbook covers the applicable laws and administrative rules that govern the use of onsite systems in Iowa (2004). The handbook includes financing options, management structures, and other considerations for onsite wastewater treatment systems.

DPBLMG36DL/Booklet: 44 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Kentucky Handbook Enabling Mechanisms for Wastewater Management
National Environmental Services Center

Approximately 60 to 70 percent of Kentucky residents rely on sewage disposal systems. These systems are being blamed for polluting many of the rivers and streams throughout Kentucky. This book discusses the Kentucky State laws and administrative rules governing the use of wastewater treatment management systems. Topics on financial and managerial options for citizens to build and maintain an onsite wastewater treatment system are also discussed.

DPBLMG52DL/Booklet: 49pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Local Groups Key to Mousam Lake Restoration
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

For decades, Maine’s Mousam Lake received increased stormwater runoff from shoreland development, lawns, roads and aging septic systems. Phosphorus in the stormwater led to increased algal growth and subsequent impairments to water quality, including decreased water clarity and dissolved oxygen. Following 10 years of intensive nonpoint source (NPS) pollution control projects, water clarity in Mousam is three feet deeper, and the lake now attains water quality standards. The Maine Department of Environmental Protection (MDEP) removed Mousam Lake from its section 303(d) impaired waters list in 2006.

WWFSMG78DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Local Limits Development Guidance
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wastewater Management

This manual provides guidance to municipalities about the development and implementation controls or limits on discharges to publicly owned treatment works (POTW). It also replaces the Guidance Manual on the Development and Implementation of Local Discharge Limitations Under the Pretreatment program that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released in December 1987. This updated version provides POTW personnel with practical guidance for determining which pollutants are of most concern, how to collect and analyze data, designing and implementing local limits, as well as providing other practical assistance.

WWBKMG43DL/Book: 262 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Managing Holding Tanks
The Ohio State University

Some remote building sites have underlying soils that prevent the use of septic systems for onsite wastewater treatment. In these special cases, some states allow holding tanks to be used for the temporary storage of household waste. This fact sheet describes how to use holding tanks safely.

WWFSMG65DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Managing Septic Tank-Mound Systems
The Ohio State University

Septic tank-mound systems consist of three parts: a septic tank, a secondary dosing tank and the mound area. This fact sheet explains how this type of system works and gives siting tips and maintenance suggestions.

WWFSMG64DL/Fact Sheet: 5pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Managing Septic Tank-Sand Bioreactor Systems
The Ohio State University, Extension

This brief fact sheet illustrates and describes step-by-step the proper management of a septic tank-sand bioreactor filtration system. When a rural home is planned for an area with shallow or very permeable soils, or in an area with a high seasonal water table, special sand bioreactors can be used to provide the necessary wastewater treatment. A septic tank-sand bioreactor system is composed of four parts: the septic tank, a dosing tank, a sand bioreactor, and a disinfected system. Wastewater flows from the septic tank into the dosing tank, is then pumped into the sand bioreactor, and then disinfected before it can be discharged to a stream or dispersed on a lot through an irrigation system. Those wastewater professionals whose work involves alternatives to the conventional septic system may find this information useful.

WWFSMG18DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Methods for Comparing Wastewater Treatment Options
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project (NDWRCDP) Research Project

Many communities face decisions regarding centralized versus decentralized wastewater treatment and the various strategies available within the sectors. In this report, analytical tools and methos are evaluated that have the potential to capture the environmental penalty of such wastewater options in non-monetary units fo rU.S. communities. Methods are classified into environmental impact assessment, open wastewater planning, and life cycle assessment. The strengths and weaknesses of each nethod, as well as ways to streamline data needs while still reliably answering quesitons about wastewater treatment alternatives are described.

WWBKMG41DL/Book: 206 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Micro-Scale Evaluation of Phosphorus Management: Alternative Wastewater Systems Evaluation
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

Understanding and reducing sources of phosphorus pollution in the landscape includes evaluating and minimizing the phosphorus contribution from onsite systems to surface waters. Many phosphorus management methods have been developed and tested for use in decentralized wastewater treatment. This project gathered information about the application, performance, cost-effectiveness, and other factors associated with each method. Results from the project proved that nearly all methods require some form of long-term management program in order to successfully address phosphorus. This finding has important implications in managing phosphorus from decentralized wastewater treatment systems.

WWBKMG45DL/Book: 255pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
National Management Measures to Control Nonpoint Source Pollution from Urban Areas
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Our nation's aquatic resources are among its most valuable assets. But these water bodies continue to be affected by urban runoff that is inadequately controlled or treated. This extensive document from the EPA provides technical assistance to state and local program managers on the best and most economical means of managing urban runoff.

WWBKMG63DL/Book: 513pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
National Management Measures to Protect and Restore Wetlands and Riparian Areas for the Abatement of Nonpoint Source Pollution
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Protecting and restoring wetlands can be a valuable tool in combating nonpoint source pollution. This guidance manual provides information about nonpoint source pollution and how this pollution can be reduced at the watershed level.

WWBKMG67DL/Book: 186 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
New Mexico Handbook for Enabling Legal Mechanisms for Wastewater Management
National Environmental Services Center

New Mexico relies heavily on groundwater as a source of drinking water. As a result, the prevention of groundwater pollution from wastewater discharge is important. New Mexico has many avenues for both incorporated and unincorporated communities to pursue wastewater funding. This handbook discusses the financing options for wastewater treatment and the potential organization structures available to manage community wastewater treatment systems.

DPBLMG37DL/Booklet: 48pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Nonpoint Source Program and Grants Guidelines for States and Territories
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet describes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s revised guidelines to states, territories, and the District of Columbia for the award of § 319 grants under the Clean Water Act for the implementation of nonpoint source (NPS) management programs, which help restore impaired waters and protect unimpaired/high quality waters. These guidelines provide the framework for using § 319 funds to achieve the specific goals, objectives, and milestones established in a state’s approved NPS management program. These new guidelines recognize annual variability in appropriations for the § 319 program, and require a revised set aside of at least 50 percent of a state’s allocation for watershed projects to provide an appropriate balance between implementation of water-shed plans and other important planning, assessment, management, and statewide NPS programs and projects. This 50 percent set aside is referred to as watershed project funds. The remaining funds are referred to as NPS program funds. Funding appropriated under § 319 can be used to implement state NPS programs including, as appropriate, non-regulatory or regulatory programs for enforcement, technical assistance, financial assistance, education, training, technology transfer, and demonstration projects to achieve implementation of best management practices and water quality goals.

WWBKMG75DL/Book: 78pp. (2013)

Price: $0.00
 
On-Site Wastewater Management Systems and their Environmental Impacts
The Ohio State University, Extension

In 1972, the U.S. Congress passed the Federal Water Pollution Control Act and set the goal of eliminating pollutant discharge into the nation’s waters. This fact sheet outlines options available to small communities and rural areas, including: • collect wastewater, treat it, and release to stream; • collect wastewater and treat before reuse through irrigation; and • build and operate small treatment systems for each individual home. The third option is generally most attractive to small communities and rural areas because it is less costly. The fact sheet emphasizes the need for onsite wastewater system management and includes a table of minimum technology and management recommendations suited to the natural resource available.

DPFSMG01DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Onsite Wastewater Management: Cost and Financing
The Ohio State University , Extension

This fact sheet gives an overview of how onsite wastewater management can help provide sewage treatment service without the high cost of building sewers and treatment plants. Many factors affect the costs of managing an onsite wastewater system, including local soil conditions and the wastewater treatment technologies used. However, most of the costs come from the wastewater operators’ salary benefits. Several approaches are currently used to collect the necessary funds to maintain an onsite wastewater management system, and most communities use a combination of financing approaches. This fact sheet highlights four methods: tax support, utility bills, annual operating permits, and payment for services.

DPFSMG02DL/Fact Sheet: 3 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Opportunities to Advance Sustainability in California's Clean Water State Revolving Fund Program: Steps Toward Implementation
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Ensuring that communities make wise clean water infrastructure investments is critical to their sustainability. Decisions about where to provide public wastewater infrastructure affect development patterns and influence where and how a community will grow. Because these issues are so important, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency partnered with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Department of Transportation to help improve access to affordable housing, provide more transportation options, and lower transportation costs while protecting the environment in communities nationwide. This report focuses on the second phase of California’s participation in a pilot project under this partnership. In the first phase, the state gathered ideas about sustainability. In this second phase, it translated those ideas into program materials that include program application items, planning flowcharts, and materials about local financing options. These materials may be used to advance implementation. Other states could use these documents as examples for how community sustainability could be incorporated into their own SRF programs.

WWBLMG82DL/Booklet: 33 pp. (2013)

Price: $0.00


 
Organic Wastewater Comounds, Pharmaceuticals, and Coliphage in Groundwater Receiving Discharge from Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems Near La Pine, Oregon: Occurence and Implications for Transport
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This project involved documenting the occurrence of organic wastewater compounds, pharmaceuticals, and coliphage in onsite wastewater. These contaminants were also documented in a shallow, unconfined, sandy aquifer that serves as the primary source of drinking water for most residents near La Pine, Oregon. Results of the documentary are reported, including views on samples taken that may prove to be useful indicators of the presence of human waste in the environment.

WWBKMG47DL/Book: 181pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Planning for Septic Systems: Use of Onsite Decentralized Wastewater Systems in Developing Areas—A guide for county decision makers, planners, and local public health officials
National Association of County Planners

An onsite management plan promotes and protects environmental quality, public health, homeowner investment, community investment, and the local tax base. Proper management of onsite systems is essential to a county's planning and zoning decision-making process regarding water quality protection. This fact sheet is an introduction to small community onsite wastewater treatment management plans to be used in developing a comprehensive management approach for the proper design, installation, operation and maintenance of onsite systems.

WWFSMG42DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Soft Path Integrated Water Resource Management: Training, Research and Development Needs
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

Water resource management in the U.S. has been dominated in recent decades by "hard path" centralized infrastructure solutions that has led to unintentional consequences and environmental damage such as depleted aquifers dried-up streambeds, and salt-water intrusion in coastal zones. This document focuses on the soft path approach on managing and protecting wastewater resources near the point of use. This report stems from a February 2002 workshop and contains information on implications for training, research, and development needs and priorities to advance the practice and use of integrated water resource management and soft path approaches.

WWBLMG25DL Booklet: 33 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Soft Path Integrated Water Resource Management: Update on: Training, Res. & Dev. Activities of the NDWRCP, Opportunities for New Projects & Collaboration
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

In February 2002, the National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project co-sponsored a national workshop, "Distributed and Nonstructural Water and Wastewater Systems: Charting 'Soft Path' to Integrated Water Resource Management." Two reports based on the discussion and conclusion of the workshop have already been released; the first outlines recommendations for federal policies, and the second describes funding, training, research and development needs. This report summarizes the training and research and development activities funded by the NDWRCDP and related Naitonal Community Decentralized Wastewater Demonstration Projects funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This report also describes opportunities for new projects and collaborations with other organizations related to soft-path integrated water resource management. These potential projects have been identified by the author subsequent to the workshop and have been reviewed and discussed by the NDWRCDP Project Steering Committee.

WWBLMG32DL/Booklet: 25pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Source Water Protection Practices Bullegin - Managing Sanitary Sewer Overflows and Combined Sewer Overflows to Prevent Contamination of Drinking Water
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet discusses preventative measures to address sanitary sewage and combined sewer overflows, including monitoring and maintenance programs, employee training, public educaiton, visual inspection of the collection system, elimination of direct pathways of overflows to source water, and incorporation of combined sewer overflow control technologies as required.

WWFSMG44DL/Fact Sheet: 5 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
South Carolina Handbook Enabling Mechanisms for Wastewater Management
National Environmental Services Center

This book covers the applicable South Carolina State laws and administrative rules governing the use of wastewater treatment management systems. Topics covered include financing options for onsite wastewater treatment and the possible management structures possible for private citizens to organize, build, and cooperatively maintain a multi-home onsite wastewater treatment system.

DPBLMG51DL/Booklet: 43pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Tribal Management of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9

To protect public health and water quality, states and local governments establish regulations for the safe and appropriate use of onsite wastewater treatment systems. This document is intended to help tribal nations determine what level of management or tribal regulation will work best to ensure public health and protect the environment.

WWFSMG62DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Using Smart Growth Techniques as: Stormwater Best Management Practices
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Development, Community and Environment Division

While land development necessarily involves the creation of impervious surfaces, how and where development takes place can influence the degree of environmental impact from runoff from streets, rooftops and yards. Water professionals now look for opportunities to lessen the volume of stormwater generated through site design practices. This book provides answers to communities questions about using smart growth techniques to integrate stormwater planning and compliance into their current development strategies.

FMBKMG59DL/Book: 112pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Utah Handbook Enabling Mechanisms for Wastewater Management
National Environmental Services Center

Utah has scarce water resources and is therefore committed to protecting and enhancing their water sources. Several state agencies are involved in the regulation of wastewater treatment systems, which filters down to local levels of authority to ensure that public and environmental health are maintained. This document details the trickling down from the state agencies to the local level on issues such as permits, oversight, licensing, enforcement, and design and management. Also discussed are sources of funding for community wastewater projects, as well as funds that may be available to individual homeowners for an onsite system.

DPBKMG50DL/Book: 59pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Voluntary National Guidelines for Management of Onsite and Clustered (Decentralized) Wastewater Treatment Systems
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This book provides an overview of the U.S. EPA's voluntary national management guidelines. Also highlighted are the five management models as presented by the U.S. EPA. The models that have been identified include homeowner awareness, maintenance contracts, operating permits, responsible management entity (RME) operation and maintenance, and RME ownership. These five models are detailed within the publication's appendices.

WWBKMG23DL Book: 62 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Wastewater Management Fact Sheet: Energy Conservation
Office of Water, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Continual increases in energy costs in the United States affect wastewater treatment plants. This fact sheet describes ways to reduce energy costs in these facilities.

WWFSMG72DL/Fact Sheet: 7pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Wastewater Planning Handbook: Mapping Onsite Treatment Needs, Pollution Risks, and Management Options Using GIS
National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project

This handbook is designed as a guide to wastewater management planning for small communities using geographical information systems (GIS). The intent of this handbook is to present methods that will provide the tools needed to foster tangile outcomes which will engable communities to take action to meet wastewater treatment needs while protecting local water resources. Case studies of how communities in Rhode Island have used this needs assessment method to overcome oniste wastewater treatment problems are included.

WWBKMG26DL/Book: 211pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Watershed Management: A Policy-Making Primer
Cornell University, Cooperative Extension

This booklet prepares the way for a formal watershed management plan. It provides an overview of watershed management policy making in which responsibilities are shared cooperatively. The booklet highlights questions for policy makers, such as:

• How can conflicts be resolved or mediated?

• Why is an educational program needed?

• What management tools or methods may be applied?

• What are common obstacles?

WWBLMG12DL/Booklet: 12 pp. (1992)

Price: $0.00
 
Watershed-scale Effort Removes Bacteria Sources
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

The Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) added numerous segments in the lower Skokomish River watershed to the state’s 1998 Clean Water Act (CWA) section 303(d) list of impaired waters because of high levels of fecal coliform (FC) bacteria. Bacteria from agriculture and other sources impaired recreation use and raised concerns about the health of shellfish beds at the mouth of the river. Local residents and tribal, local and state governments removed high-risk septic systems and installed numerous best management practices (BMPs). FC levels dropped throughout the watershed. Data from a long-term ambient monitoring station on the Skokomish River have shown consistent compliance with water quality standards, prompting Ecology to remove that segment from Washington’s 2008 list of impaired waters. Recent monitoring indicates that seven additional segments in the Skokomish River watershed are meeting water quality standards and might be proposed for delisting in the near future.

WWFSMG80DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Watershed-scale Efforts Reduce Bacteria Levels
Watershed-scale Efforts Reduce Bacteria Levels U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

In the mid-1990s, high fecal coliform (FC) bacteria levels in Washington’s lower Nooksack River Basin violated water quality standards, prompting the Washington Department of Ecology to add numerous segments of the river basin to the state’s Clean Water Act (CWA) section 303(d) list of impaired waters. The high FC also polluted Portage Bay shellfish beds, causing the Lummi Nation to voluntarily close the shellfish beds to harvesting. To address the pollution concerns, basin stakeholders completed a FC total maximum daily load (TMDL) study, prompting them to implement best management practices, including nutrient management planning, upgrading septic systems and excluding livestock from streams. Since then, FC levels have dropped, allowing all shellfish beds to be reopened for harvest. Three Nooksack River tributary segments have met water quality standards and TMDL load reduction targets for the past few years, thus enabling them to be removed from the list of impaired waters in 2008.

WWFSMG81DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
West Virginia Handbook for Enabling Legal Mechanisms for Wastewater Management
National Environmental Services Center

With a substantial rural population and rugged terrain, West Virginia makes extensive use of onsite sewage disposal. Forty percent of West Virginia's housing units use septic tanks, while 55 percent use public sewers. The last five percent use other methods of sewage disposal. West Virginia has state laws and rules governing the use of onsite treatment systems. These laws and rules are discussed, as well as financial options and public and private management of wastewater.

DPBLMG35DL/Booklet: 48pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


   
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