CART HELP
. How To Use
. View All Products
. Who We Are
. Contact Us

Drinking Water (DW) Product Categories
. Case Studies
. Design
. Finance
. General Information
. Management
. On Tap
. O & M
. Public Education
. Regulations
. Research
. Tech Briefs
. Training

Waste Water (WW) Product Categories
. Case Studies
. Design
. Finance
. General Information
. Management
. O & M
. Pipeline
. Public Education
. Regulations
. Research
. Small Flows
. Tech Overviews
. Training

Moving Our Inventory to Better Serve You

Because moving our inventory online is a work in progress, you may not find everything you want or need today. You may see a message that says, No products are currently available in this category. But don't worry! You can still use our current list and order as usual while our shelves are being filled. To order from the catalog, Download the 2010 NESC Products Catalog pdf file (932 KB in size). Eventually all of our products will be available to you through the Free Shopping Cart. We welcome your comments about this service.



Home » Pipeline

 Checkout
 
Aerobic Treatment Units: An Alternative to Septic Systems
National Environmental Services Center

This Pipeline issue is an update to the winter 1996 issue. The focus is on individual home aerobic units as an alternative for onsite wastewater treatment. How aerobic treatment works and the importance of routine maintenance are discussed.

SFPLNL42DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Alternative Dispersal Options
National Environmental Services Center

If a building site is not-quite-perfect, the homeowner may choose from a number of alternative systems. The Fall 2002 Pipeline explains why an alternative to the conventional septic system may be desirable. Several alternative onsite systems are discussed and illustrated, including the contour system, drip irrigation, gravelless and chamber systems, mound system/at grade, evapotranspiration, and a pressure/low pressure pipe system. Comparison of cost and non-cost factors of septic system alternatives is presented in table form. This information could be very helpful to the homeowner who seeks alternatives to the conventional septic system, and could be easily used as part of an overall educational program by community leaders, local officials, and public health officials.

SFPLNL31DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Alternative Sewers: A Good Option for Many Communities
National Environmental Services Center

The Fall 1996 Pipeline presents various alternative sewer technologies and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Because they don’t require deep excavation, alternative sewers may be a more practical and economical choice for small communities and residential developments than conventional gravity sewers. The newsletter discusses technologies such as pressure sewers, septic tank effluent pump systems, grinder pumps, small diameter gravity sewers, and vacuum sewers.

SFPLNL07DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00
 
Alternative Toilets Options for Conservation and Specific Site Conditions
National Environmental Services Center

The Summer 2000 Pipeline describes many types of alternative toilets that can be used in homes and public restroom facilities. The newsletter summarizes the operation, maintenance, advantages, and disadvantages of each type. Two case studies show how alternative toilet systems helped to resolve wastewater disposal problems.

SFPLNL22DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Alternatives to Gravel Drainfields
National Environmental Services Center

This issue of Pipeline investigates the use of crushed glass, broken concrete, and rubber tire chips to reduce gravel in areas where the supply of gravel has become scarce or expensive to use as the media in soil absorption systems. Gravelless and chamber systems as additional options are also presented.

SFPLNL41DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Basic Wastewater Characteristics
National Environmental Services Center

The Fall 1997 Pipeline features basic information about wastewater components and characteristics. Wastewater temperature, flow, and pH are discussed. This newsletter highlights a California resort that dramatically reduced the amount of wastewater it generated by implementing water conservation methods.

SFPLNL11DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00


 
Choose the Right Consultant for Your Wastewater Project
National Environmental Services Center

The Winter 1997 Pipeline offers suggestions and information for small communities planning to hire a wastewater consultant. Topics include sending requests for proposals (RFPs), conducting interviews, and negotiating contracts. The newsletter includes an article about how two small communities joined forces for a rural Pennsylvania wastewater project.

SFPLNL08DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs)—A Priority for Small Communities
National Environmental Services Center

The Spring 1995 Pipeline focuses on combined sewer overflow (CSO) issues for small communities. It describes what a CSO is and why CSO controls are important. The newsletter also discusses control policies and guidance documents available to assist communities with controlling CSOs. The newsletter includes two case studies featuring small communities and how they are working to solve CSO problems.

SFPLNL01DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00


 
Constructed Wetlands: A Natural Treatment Alternative
National Environmental Services Center

The Summer 1998 Pipeline presents the advantages and disadvantages of two types of constructed wetlands: surface flow and subsurface flow systems. Articles explain how wetland systems function and how they can be used with community systems and individual onsite systems to treat wastewater. A case study describes how an Ohio community used subsurface flow wetlands for onsite wastewater treatment.

SFPLNL14DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Systems
National Environmental Services Center

The Fall 2000 Pipeline discusses using a decentralized approach (as opposed to a centralized treatment facility) when a small community needs to upgrade or replace its existing wastewater treatment system. This newsletter examines how a combination of onsite systems and cluster systems can perform just as well and less expensively than a centralized system. Case studies describing treatment methods, management strategies, and funding issues show how other towns have resolved their wastewater problems.

SFPLNL23DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Drainfield Rehabilitation
National Environmental Services Center

Failure of soil absorption systems occurs for many reasons, ranging from improper siting, design, or construction to overuse of water. It is important to determine the exact cause of failure before attempting to remediate or repair the onsite system. This issue of Pipeline will discuss the process for correcting system failure, including gathering information about the system, determining the cause of failure, and designing the corrective action.

SFPLNL40DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
EPA's Voluntary Management Guidelines: Models 1, 2, and 3
National Environmental Services Center

In response to concerns about the performance of onsite wastewater treatment systems EPA recently published a set of management models designed to help state, tribal, and local authorities meet water quality standards. This issue of Pipeline interprets the three models into simple terms. A case study about a county in Virginia that are putting parts of these models into use is included.

SFPLNL44DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
EPA's Voluntary Management Guidelines: Models 4 and 5
National Environmental Services Center

In response to concerns about the performance of onsite wastewater treatment systems EPA recently published a set of management models designed to help state, tribal, and local authorities meet water quality standards. This issue of Pipeline provides a detailed look at Models 4 and 5 and includes a case study where elements of these models are put into practice.

SFPLNL45DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
EPA's Voluntary Management Guidelines—An Overview
National Environmental Services Center

In response to concerns about the performance of onsite wastewater treatment systems EPA recently published a set of management models designed to help state, tribal, and local authorities meet water quality standards. This issue of Pipeline interprets these voluntary guidelines into simple terms. The guidelines are also presented in a two-page chart format for further clarity.

SFPLNL43DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Evapotranspiration Systems
National Environmental Services Center

The Winter 2000 Pipeline focuses on two versions of evapotranspiration systems:

• the lined system that disposes of wastewater without permitting effluent to move into the soil, and

• the evapotranspiration/absorption system that is constructed without a liner to permit a very slow rate of seepage into the ground.

This newsletter describes how the systems are designed, how they treat wastewater effluent, and what climate and soil situations warrant their use. Advantages and disadvantages are included.

SFPLNL20DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Explaining the Activated Sludge Process
National Environmental Services Center

This issue of Pipeline explains the activated sludge process and discusses the three most common variations: extended aeration, sequencing batch readers, and oxidation ditches. A chart for advantages and disadvantages for each variation is provided, as well as a checklist for safety considerations and problem/effect table.

SFPLNL33DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
First Aid for a Flooded Septic System
National Environmental Services Center

This issue of Pipeline provides recommendations for homeowners for keeping their septic system functioning before, during and after flooding situations.

SFPLNL46DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Funding Sources Are Available for Wastewater Projects
National Environmental Services Center

The Fall 1999 Pipeline highlights funding sources for homeowners or small communities wanting to install or repair onsite wastewater treatment systems. It outlines commonly used sources of funding from the EPA and other federal agencies, as well as less-known avenues of funding, such as regional programs and nonprofit organizations. A case study summarizes how one small community secured funding for its wastewater treatment project.

SFPLNL19DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Gravelless and Chamber Systems: Alternative Drainfield Designs
National Environmental Services Center

The Summer 2001 Pipeline presents an overview of gravelless and contour drainfield systems for onsite wastewater treatment and dispersal. The newsletter compares the two technologies with conventional drainfields. It also discusses operation and maintenance and advantages and disadvantages. The newsletter includes a case study about a chamber system used in a West Virginia School.

SFPLNL26DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Graywater: Safe Reuse and Recycling
National Environmental Services Center

The Winter 2002 Pipeline discusses the state of graywater use in the U.S. Graywater is generally defined as all wastewater generated from household activities except that produced from the toilet and kitchen sink. As clean water resources become more scarce, the concept of separating out the graywater from a home's waste stream and using it to supplement the family's water demand is becoming increasingly appealing. The newsletter evaluates the safety and legality of graywater use.

SFPLNL28DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
High-strength flows—not your average wastewater
National Environmental Services Center

This Pipeline offers appropriate onsite treatment solutions and a case study, which looks at a Connecticut restaurant's experience with high BOD and TSS loads and how a new recirculation tank and sand filter provided improved treatment. A brief summation of US EPA's Class V Injection Wells ruling is also included. This issue describes the characteristics of wastewater produced by various nonresidential sources such as RV dumping stations, restaurants, car washes, beauty shops, and personal care homes that are often located in rural areas and use onsite systems for wastewater treatment.

SFPLNL34DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Homeowner's Guide to Onsite System Regulations
National Environmental Services Center

The Winter 1998 Pipeline examines common onsite wastewater system regulations and how they affect property transfers, professional qualifications, operation and maintenance, and system changes and repairs. The newsletter outlines steps that homeowners and others typically must take to have systems approved. The newsletter highlights health officials' roles and responsibilities, citing an example of a health inspector in rural Kentucky who helps install onsite wastewater systems.

SFPLNL12DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
How to Keep Your Water 'Well'
National Environmental Services Center

It is important to ensure a safe drinking water supply. The Summer 2002 Pipeline informs us how to keep our water ‘well.’ Groundwater quality, private wells, well placement, identification of contaminants, and septic systems are all covered in this newsletter. Also included are recommended steps to protect groundwater supplies and minimum horizontal separations between drinking water sources and wastewater disposal systems.

SFPLNL30DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Infiltration and Inflow Can Be Costly for Communities
National Environmental Services Center

The Spring 1999 Pipeline describes common causes of inflow/infiltration (I/I) problems and how they impact sewer systems, public health, and the environment in small communities. The newsletter discusses methods to identify I/I, such as smoke testing and closed-circuit television inspection. Common rehabilitation methods are described. The newsletter includes a case study from a small Alaskan community and contacts and resources to help small communities that struggle with I/I problems.

SFPLNL17DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Inspections Equal Preventative Care for Onsite Systems
National Environmental Services Center

The Spring 1998 Pipeline focuses on the advantages of having regular onsite wastewater system inspections. It explains what occurs during an inspection, when and how often systems should be inspected, and how to locate a qualified inspector. The newsletter lists questions homeowners may be asked about their systems and discusses the homeowner's role in the process. A Delaware inspector shares his experiences and offers advice to homeowners.

SFPLNL13DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Lagoon Systems Can Provide Low-Cost Wastewater Treatment
National Environmental Services Center

The Spring 1997 Pipeline explores how lagoon systems use natural and energy-efficient processes to provide low-cost wastewater treatment for communities and individual residences. The newsletter describes how different types of wastewater treatment lagoons work and includes a chart to help identify lagoon problems. It also contains profiles of communities that use lagoons.

SFPLNL09DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00


 
Maintaining Your Septic System—A Guide for Homeowners
National Environmental Services Center

This update to the Fall 1995 Pipeline focuses on educating homeowners about proper septic system operation and maintenance. Topics include groundwater pollution, system inspections, and the use of additives and cleaners. The newsletter includes a handy list of important septic system do's and don'ts.

SFPLNL39DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Management Programs Can Help Small Communities
National Environmental Services Center

The Spring 1996 Pipeline offers strategies for developing centralized programs for operating, maintaining, or monitoring decentralized systems. It explains how management programs give communities more control over their wastewater treatment. The newsletter includes tools and strategies for setting up and maintaining a management program and two examples of established management programs.

SFPLNL05DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00


 
Managing Biosolids in Small Communities
National Environmental Services Center

The Fall 1998 Pipeline presents a brief overview of small community options for managing biosolids. Articles explain how residual wastes from wastewater treatment processes (such as domestic septage and sewage sludge) are stabilized to produce biosolids. The newsletter discusses the safety and benefits of biosolids recycling and some of the requirements of the 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 503 standards. A list of contacts is provided.

SFPLNL15DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Mounds: A Septic System Alternative
National Environmental Services Center

The Summer 1999 Pipeline offers basic information for homeowners and community leaders about mound systems. Mounds were developed to overcome natural conditions that prohibit the use of traditional subsurface absorption systems. The newsletter summarizes how a mound system works, its advantages and disadvantages, how to properly maintain a mound, and ways that a homeowner can landscape a mound system.

SFPLNL18DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Paying for Onsite System Management
National Environmental Services Center

The Fall 2001 Pipeline discusses ways small communities can finance the centralized management of onsite wastewater treatment systems to ensure their performance. The newsletter outlines many funding options and resources. It includes a case study of how one small community funds their onsite system management program.

SFPLNL27DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products: An Overview
National Environmental Services Center

Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) include such things as antibiotics and hormones that are turning up in our waterways. Research is only beginning to understand the possible health effects of these chemicals. This article includes a detailed diagram showing the origins and fate of PPCPs in the environmment and gives tips on how homeowners can prevent them from entering the system.

SFPLNL47DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Planning Is Essential for Successful Onsite System Management
National Environmental Services Center

The Spring 2001 Pipeline outlines many factors that community leaders need to consider when planning onsite system management. The newsletter promotes centralized management as a way for communities to ensure that local onsite systems are adequately monitored and maintained and that public health and the environment are protected. Most of the information is adapted or taken directly from a prepublication draft of the new EPA Design Manual.

SFPLNL25DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Preparing for the Unexpected: An Assessment Process for Small Wastewater Systems
National Environmental Services Center

This issue is intended to serve as a guide for decision makers when considering the vulnerability of their wastewater treatment system. Also discussed are recognizing your system's assets, identifying potential threats, defining the system's vulnerability to these threats, and developing a plan of action in response to the emergency. The end result of this process is an improved ability to prioritize and implement effective actions, safeguarding your community's public health, economic assets, and environment.

SFPLNL32DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Protecting Your Source Water—Volunteers Help Get the Job Done
National Environmental Services Center

Small communities should take advantage of local volunteers to complete environmental projects that help protect local waters. This issue gives local leaders tips on recruiting, training and advice on how to fully utilize their local volunteer workforce.

SFPLNL51DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
Quality Control for Homeowners
National Environmental Services Center

Most septic system failures can be attributed to poor design and improper installation. This issue of Pipeline provides tips for homeowners to ensure that the installation of their septic system is done properly.

SFPLNL48DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Residential Runoff—Slow it Down, Keep it Clean
National Environmental Services Center

According to the National Water Quality Inventory, urban and suburban runoff (water flowing away from homes and buildings that passes over pavement and other solid surfaces) is the leading source of all water degradation. This Pipeline shows you how to minimize the runoff from your home through appropriate landscaping, rain gardens, septic tank maintenance, and reduction in chemicals.

SFPLNL52DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00
 
Sand Filters Provide Quality, Low-Maintenance Treatment
National Environmental Services Center

The Summer 1997 Pipeline features information about sand filters. These onsite wastewater treatment systems are often used to provide high-quality treatment for environmentally sensitive areas or additional treatment where septic tank/soil absorption systems have failed. This newsletter describes open, buried, and recirculating sand filters; how they work; and how to operate and maintain them.

SFPLNL10DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00


 
Septic Systems and Source Water Protection
National Environmental Services Center

If you own an onsite wastewater system, such as a septic system, you plan an important role in protecting your community’s water quality. Unfortunately, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports that one of the biggest causes of water pollution is onsite wastewater systems that aren’t working correctly. This Pipeline provides information about how you can maintain your system and help assure good, clean water for your community.

SFPLNL49DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Septic Systems—A Practical Alternative for Small Communities
National Environmental Services Center

This issue is an update of the Spring 1995 issue of Pipeline and presents basic information on septic tank systems, how they work, and where homeowners and community leaders can find further information and assistance. Discussions on landscaping septic systems, siphons, and alternating and interlacing drainfields are included, as well as advantages and disadvantages of septic systems. Drawings of a typical residential septic system, pump system, and siphon are given.

SFPLNL38DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Septic Tank Enhancements
National Environmental Services Center

This issue of Pipeline investigates some of the options available to enhance the efficiency of your septic tank or to make maintenance more convenient.

SFPLNL35DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Site Evaluations
National Environmental Services Center

The Spring 2000 Pipeline explains the importance of a site evaluation prior to installing an onsite wastewater system. The newsletter discusses planning for an onsite system and how testing determines which type of system is appropriate for a particular site. Topics include the preliminary site evaluation, soil properties and surveys, field testing, landscape contour and subsurface drainage, and water movement. The newsletter offers suggested site evaluation procedures and tips.

SFPLNL21DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Soil Characteristics - Demystifying Dirt
National Environmental Services Center

The Spring 2002 Pipeline focuses on soil characteristics, conditions, and components. Soil evaluation procedures are outlined, and textural properties (feeling and appearance) of mineral soils are explained. Dispersal selection methods are noted under various site constraints. A case study in Indiana describes how Wells and Allen Counties evaluated soils to correct failing systems. This information is accessible to the general public, and could be useful as part of a homeowner or community education program.

SFPLNL29DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Source Water Protection for Local Officials
National Environmental Services Center

Your drinking water sources are valuable assets to you and the people you serve. Keeping these source water clean is a smart practice. This issue focuses on onsite wastewater system issues related to source water protection.

SFPLNL50DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Spray and Drip Irrigation for Wastewater Reuse, Disposal
National Environmental Services Center

The Winter 1999 Pipeline explains how treated wastewater can be recycled and applied to land through spray and drip irrigation. It presents some of the benefits of reuse for small communities, farms, businesses, and individual homeowners. The newsletter discusses system design and advantages and disadvantages. A case study describes a drip system at a Wisconsin elementary school.

SFPLNL16DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
The Attached Growth Process—An old technology takes on new forms
National Environmental Services Center

This issue of Pipeline describes some of the more common types of attached growth filters: sand, peat, and textile; trickling filters and rotating biological contractors (RBC's); and subsurface flow from wetlands. Each of these systems are explained along with advantages and disadvantages of each.

SFPLNL36DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
The Disinfection Question—Answers for Onsite Systems
National Environmental Services Center

This issue investigates the option of disinfection, what it means, how it works, and what method might be right for a given onsite situation. Chlorination and UV disinfection are discussed in detail, including chlorine dose design guidelines and typical UV system design parameters. Also included is a table of infectious agents potentially present in untreated domestic wastewater.

SFPLNL37DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Wastewater Treatment Protects Small Community Life, Health
National Environmental Services Center

The Summer 1996 Pipeline examines the importance of wastewater treatment for safeguarding the health and environment of small communities. It identifies potential health and environmental risks posed by inadequate treatment. This newsletter discusses the diseases commonly caused by untreated wastewater and how they spread.

SFPLNL06DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (1996)

Price: $0.00


 
Water Softener Use Raises Questions for System Owners
National Environmental Services Center

People question whether water softeners can cause problems in septic systems. The Winter 2001 Pipeline examines water softening regeneration brine disposal and the controversy over possible effects brine flows may have on septic systems. In addition to presenting differing expert opinions on the subject, the newsletter discusses an alternative to sodium chloride as the softening agent. A case study outlining a golf course community’s switch to this alternative shows positive results from the change.

SFPLNL24DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Watershed Management: An Overview
National Environmental Services Center

Clean water is of vital importance to our health and our economy. And all of our activities can impact its purity. This issue of Pipeline explains how watersheds work and details how watershed-based protection management plans operate. Several case studies are included.

SFPLNL53DL/Newsletter: 8pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


   
NESC Logo

The National Environmental Services Center (NESC)
(phone) 800-624-8301 (e-mail) info@mail.nesc.wvu.edu
(web) www.nesc.wvu.edu

© Copyright 2010, NESC All Rights Reserved.

Survey Software powered by SurveyMethods.com used for NESC Customer Questionnaire.