CART HELP
. How To Use
. View All Products
. Who We Are
. Contact Us

Drinking Water (DW) Product Categories
. Case Studies
. Design
. Finance
. General Information
. Management
. On Tap
. O & M
. Public Education
. Regulations
. Research
. Tech Briefs
. Training

Waste Water (WW) Product Categories
. Case Studies
. Design
. Finance
. General Information
. Management
. O & M
. Pipeline
. Public Education
. Regulations
. Research
. Small Flows
. Tech Overviews
. Training

Moving Our Inventory to Better Serve You

Because moving our inventory online is a work in progress, you may not find everything you want or need today. You may see a message that says, No products are currently available in this category. But don't worry! You can still use our current list and order as usual while our shelves are being filled. To order from the catalog, Download the 2010 NESC Products Catalog pdf file (932 KB in size). Eventually all of our products will be available to you through the Free Shopping Cart. We welcome your comments about this service.



Home » Public Education (DW)

 Checkout
 
21 Water Conservation Measures for Everybody
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This fact sheet explains the importance of water conservation and provides statistics about current water consumption, as well as water wastage. A list of actions for conserving water is included.

DWFSPE60DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1992)

Price: $0.00
 
Giardia: Drinking Water Health Advisory
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Science and Technology; Office of Water

Giardia, a pathogenic microorganism, is transmitted to humans through contaminated water. This document describes Giardia, its transmission to and health effects in humans, treatment for the associated illness, and treatment processes that are required for its removal.

DWBLPE190DL/Booklet: 42 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
A Health Guide for the Public in Disaster Planning and Recovery
State of West Virginia, Department of Health & Human Resources, Bureau for Public Health

Acidity or low pH of drinking water is usually a result of natural geological conditions at the site. This pamphlet informs homeowners of the potential effects of acidic or alkaline pH and offers some tips for corrective actions.

DWBLPE334DL/Booklet: 36 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
A Homeowner's Guide to Your Well
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

Modern wells provide a safe, efficient water supply to more than 42 million people nationwide. For many new homeowners, using and maintaining a well is a novel experience. This brochure provides answers to homeowners questions and includes a checklist for determining a well's condition.

DWBRPE399DL/Brochure: 2pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
A Shared Well Agreement
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

When buying a property with a shared well, a legal agreement is essential, to protect your access to the water supply and to spell out the costs and responsibilities involved in maintaining the system. This fact sheet offers a sample shared well water agreement and includes additional considerations when entering into this type of agreement.

DWBLPE405DL/Fact Sheet: 8pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Activated Carbon Treatment of Drinking Water Suppplies
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Activated carbon filters are used to remove unwanted tastes, odors, radon, and some man-made volatile organic contaminants from drinking water. This fact sheet describes the types of units that are available, their effectiveness, and other considerations to think about before buying a home water treatment system.

DWFSPE287DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Aeration Treatment of Drinking Water Supplies
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Aeration is effective against dissolved gases such as radon, carbon dioxide, some taste and odor problems, such as methane and hydrogen sulfide, as well as volatile organic compounds. It also can be used for precipitation and removal of iron and manganese. Lean how aeration works and about water treatment equipment that can be installed in the home.

DWFSPE292DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Aging Water Infrastructure Research Program: Addressing the Challenge Through Innovation
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development

The Aging Water Infrastructure Research Program is a new effort by the EPA to generate the science and engineering needed to address our aging water network. This fact sheet describes the issues, details the current state of technology and introduces some of the new research being initiated by this program.

DWFSPE395DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Answers to your Questions about Groundwater
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Drinking Water and Groundwater

Groundwater, the supply of fresh water located beneath the earth's surface, is a major source of drinking water. This brochure answers questions about groundwater contamination and private wells and offers suggestions for how to protect the groundwater around your community.

DWBLPE124DL/Booklet: 16pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Answers to Your Questions on Well Abandonment
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Drinking Water and Groundwater

Unused and improperly abandoned wells are a significant threat to groundwater quality. This illustrated booklet explains the threats imposed by abandoned wells, steps to take and materials to use to properly close and fill wells when they are no longer in service, who can perform the work, and what administrative procedures should be followed to complete the process.

DWBLPE130DL/Booklet: 8 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00


 
Answers to Your Questions on Well Filling and Sealing
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resource, Bureau of Drinking Water and Groundwater

Water passing through improperly filled wells will not undergo the natural treatment that occurs when it passes through natural soil formations. This document explains when and how to properly abandon wells and suggests various materials that can be used to fill wells. Sources of information are included.

DWBLPE158DL/Booklet: 8 pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00
 
Arsenic in Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Arsenic occurs naturally in the soil and bedrock throughout many parts of the U.S. Several types of home treatment systems are available for removing or reducing the amounty of arsenic in water. This fact sheet discusses potential health effects of arsenic poisoning, testing for its presence, and corrective actions to take to remove it from drinking water.

DWFSPE289DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Arsenic In Your Drinking Water
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water & Drinking Water

Arsenic is a toxic chemical element found in the Earth's crust in soil and rocks and can enter drinking water through the ground or as runoff into surface water sources. This fact sheet gives consumers important information about this element and if they should be concerned about arsenic in their drinking water.

DWFSPE355DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Arsenic Rule Implementation Guidance for Maryland Public Water Systems
Maryland Department of the Environment, Water Supply Program

On January 23, 2001, the EPA finalized the arsenic rule. All community and nontransient noncommunity water systems were required to comply with this new standard by 1/23/06. This booklet was developed to help public water systems to comply with the new standards. Compliance requirements and compliance options are described. Also included is information about arsenic waste disposal and funding and technical resources for small community systems.

DWBLPE321DL/Booklet: 19 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Assessing the Risk of Groundwater Contamination from Drinking Water Well Condition
Vermont Natural Resources Conservation Districts

About 95 percent of this country’s rural residents use groundwater for their drinking water and farmstead needs. Wells are designed to provide clean water, but must be properly constructed and maintained to avoid contamination. This worksheet will take you step by step through your drinking water well condition and management practices.

DWFSPE338DL/Fact Sheet: 6 pp. (1997)

Price: $0.00
 
Atrazine
Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division of Environmental Quality, Public Drinking Water Program

Atrazine is one of the most widely used agricultural pesticides in the U.S. This factsheet describes atrizine, its potential adverse health effects, its fate in the environment, and what steps the U.S. EPA has taken to protect public health. It specifically discusses atrizine’s presence in drinking water in Missouri.

DWFSPE188DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00


 
Bacteria in Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Private well owners are responsible for the quality of their drinking water. Bacterial contamination cannot be detected by sight, smell, or taste. This fact sheet discusses health effects due to the presence of bacteria, where they come from, testing of private well water, and disinfection treatment to correct problems.

DWFSPE291DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Bacteria in Your Water : What You Need to Know
National Groundwater Association

Private well owners control their own water supply. With this benefit comes responsibility. This fact sheet briefly outlines bacterial contamination problems in well water and suggests actions to take to correct them.

DWFSPE265DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Bacteriological Contamination of Drinking Water
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Drinking Water and Groundwater

Wells can become contaminated a number of ways. This illustrated fact sheet lists several of them, plus gives an overview of testing, tells how to locate possible contamination sources, and describes the means of disinfecting home water supplies.

DWFSPE140DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Best Management Practices for Private Water Systems: A Guide to Proper Maintenance of Private Water Wells
Penn State University, College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

Improperly constructed or poorly maintained wells can create a pathway for pollutants into your home drinking water. This brochure has information about proper well maintenance, the best line of defense against a polluted water source.

DWBRPE267DL/Brochure: 2pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Better Homes & Groundwater
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

Homeowners need to be groundwater smart. The suggestions in this booklet for lawn and garden care, household chemical use and disposal, and well and septic system maintenance can help keep pollutants from entering streams, lakes, and rivers.

DWBLPE129DL/Booklet: 24 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
Border 2012 Accomplishments Report (2010-2012) U.S.-Mexico Environmental Program
Border 2012 Accomplishments Report (2010-2012) U.S.-Mexico Environmental Program
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The Border 2012 Environmental Program has become a model for bi-national programs set on improving conditions on the U.S.-Mexico border. The program uses a community-based approach that focuses on the environmental needs of the people who live and work there. This booklet discuses border projects, including scrap tire removals, watershed cleanups, air quality monitoring, stormwater harvesting, soil sampling, and community health worker training.

DWBLPE443DL/Booklet: 28pp. (2012)

Price: $0.00


 
Bottled Water: Helpful Facts and Information
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Intended for the general public, this brochure describes how the Food and Drug Administration regulates the bottled water industry. It contains helpful hints about using bottled water with, or in place of, public or private water supplies.

DWBRPE04DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (1990)

Price: $0.00
 
Buying a Home with a Well
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

This fact sheet gives first-time well owners clear guidance about how to inspect a well.

DWFSPE404DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


Careers in Water Quality
Careers in Water Quality
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

In this video produced by the Water Pollution Control Federation, a teacher and his students explore water quality careers as they work on a class project. They interview people in various water-related professions, including scientists, computer specialists, engineers, attorneys, and government officials. The students realize that pursuing a career in the water quality field can make a worthwhile contribution to the environment and be personally rewarding as well.

DWDVPE25DL/Video: 0 pp. (2005)

*** For video downloading and viewing instructions, please use this link

Price: $0.00
 
Children and Drinking Water Standards
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

People want to know that their children drink safe tap water. This EPA booklet explains how national standards contribute to drinking water safety and helps readers make informed choices about their drinking water. The booklet includes a list of contaminants, acceptable concentrations, their source, and contaminants' effects on children's health. DWBRPE104DL/Booklet: 16 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Citizen Monitoring: Recommendations to Household Well Users
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Many people receive their drinking water from individually owned and operated sources such as household wells, cisterns, and springs. As private sources, system owners are solely responsible for the quality of the water provided. This booklet provides information about drinking water issues and steps consumers might use to protect their wells from contamination.

DWBLPE32DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (1990)

Price: $0.00
 
Citizen's Guide to Ground-Water Protection
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This document introduces the natural cycle of groundwater and how groundwater can become contaminated. It examines ways to protect groundwater supplies and describes the roles that individuals and communities can play in protecting groundwater supplies.

DWBLPE37DL/Booklet: 34 pp. (1990)

Price: $0.00


 
Class V Injection Wells and Your Drinking Water
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

More than 89 percent of U.S. public water supplies come from groundwater sources. These water supplies are vulnerable to contamination from liquid waste disposal sites called "Class V" wells. This brochure explains what Class V wells are, where they are located, and what to do if you have a Class V well located on your property.

DWBRPE103DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (1994)

Price: $0.00
 
Clean Water: It's Time to Learn the Facts
Lakehead Region Conservation Authority

A model source protection plan safeguards our health and health of our families, ensures that safe, clean drinking water is available and protects current and future sources of drinking water. This pamphlet describes the protection area of the Lakehead Region Conservation Authority (that abuts Lake Superior) and educates residents on their role.

DWBRPE359DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Cleaner Water Through Conservation
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wetlands, Oceans & Watersheds

This book explains the relationship between water quantity and quality and how people can improve water quality in general by conserving.

DWBKPE53DL/Book: 67 pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00
 
Closing an Abandoned Well
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

Abandoned wells may be full of contaminants threatening the water quality in nearby wells. Large diameter open wells also pose a threat to children and animals. This fact sheet describes the risks of abandoned wells, how to find lost wells and provides details on how to seal an abandoned well.

DWFSPE402DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Consider the Source: A Pocket Guide to Protecting Your Drinking Water
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

Virtually every stream, lake, river, and aquifer in this country is used as a drinking water source. Protecting these source waters from contaminants is a major national priority. This booklet discusses the Source Water Protection Program and provides suggestions and descriptions for water protection measures that can be used in any community.

DWBLPE136DL/Booklet: 52 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00
 
Consider the Source: An Interactive Guide to Protecting America's Drinking Wtaer
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This download provides users with a picture of how water gets to consumers, following its journey for source to tap—describing virtually everything that happens along the way.

DWCDPE393DL/Multiple Zip Files 2.3 MB: 0 pp. (2004)

*Mac users start by opening source.swf with a Flash media viewer.

Price: $0.00


 
Consumer Fact Sheet on Cyanide
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

Cyanide may cause health problems if found in amounts greater than the health standard set by the U.S. EPA. This fact sheet describes cyanide, its health effects, and how it occurs in the environment, including some public or private drinking water supplies.

DWFSPE230DL/Fact Sheet: 3 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00
 
Contaminants and Drinking-Water Sources in 2001: Recent Findings of the U.S. Geological Survey
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey studies numerous issues related to contamination of drinking water. They monitor distribution, sources, transport, transformations, and the fate of contaminants, and they assess the vulnerability of source waters. This booklet discusses the outcome of their research and includes examples of drinking water related projects completed or underway at the USGS.

DWBLPE117DL/Booklet: 13 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Coping with Low Water Levels
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

This fact sheet gives homeowners tips for coping with low water levels in their private well. Information is included about why water levels change, how to measure water levels and options for making an existing well more efficient.

DWFSPE403DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Copper in Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Copper rarely occurs naturally in drinking water but my be present as a result of corrosion from the plumbing system. Indications of copper, testing for its presence and corrective actions to take are discussed in this fact sheet.

DWFSPE290DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Copper, Drinking Water, and You
Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities and the National Drinking Water Clearinghouse

This factsheet explains how copper enters drinking water and the effects it can have on people if consumed. EPA’s maximum contaminant level for copper in drinking water is discussed, as well as ways consumers can obtain safe water.

DWFSPE30DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (1993)

Price: $0.00
 
Cryptosporidiosis and Drinking Water—Information for Individuals with Weakened Immune Systems Due to: Cancer Treatment, Organ Transplants, Inherited Diseases, or HIV/AIDS
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Division of Epidemiology, Environmental and Occupational Health Consumer and Environmental Health Services

This brochure provides information about cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness caused by Cryptosporidium parvum, a microscopic parasite sometimes found in drinking water. It provides an overview of the illness and provides information about how to avoid getting sick, as well as how to detect and treat the illness.

DWBRPE201DL/Brochure: 2pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Cryptosporidium and Drinking Water
Arizona Department of Environmental Quality

Cryptosporidium parvum is an intestinal parasite that can cause diarrhea, nausea, cramps, and other symptoms. This fact sheet discusses the illness cryptosporidiosis, how the parasites get into water, and how public drinking water can be protected.

DWBRPE162DL/Brochure: 2pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00
 
Cryptosporidium and Drinking Water (Spanish)
Arizona Department of Environmental Quality

Cryptosporidium parvum is an intestinal parasite that can cause diarrhea, nausea, cramps, and other symptoms. This brochure discusses the illness cryptosporidiosis, how the parasites get into water, and how public drinking water can be protected.

DWBRPE173DL/Brochure: 2 pp. (1995)

Price: $0.00


 
Cryptosporidium in Drinking Water
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Servics, Division of Epidemiology, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, Consumer and Environmental Health Services

Cryptosporidium is a microscopic parasite capable of living in the intestines of humans and animals. This booklet discusses how the parasite is passed to humans from contaminated drinking water and provides information about related health concerns. It also includes information about preventing and treating Cryptosporidium outbreaks.

DWBLPE212DL/Fact Sheet: 16 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Cryptosporidium: Drinking Water Health Advisory
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water

Chryptosporidium, a pathogenic protozoan, is common in untreated water and can persist for months in this environment. Common water disinfection practices, such as chlorination, are ineffective, but a well-operated water filtration system can remove 99 percent of the oocysts. This booklet describes the organism, avenues of transmission to humans, and the regulations regarding its elimination from drinking water.

DWBLPE193DL/Booklet: 31 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00


 
Determining the Depth of a Well
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

The quality and quantity of water from your well depends on the geology and hydrology of the area. This fact sheet gives homeowners information about basic well construction and how to estimate the depth of a private well.

DWFSPE401DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Determining the Yield of a Well
Water Systems Council

Homeowners need to know the yield of their well to ensure that it can sustain them in demanding times. Many communities require a yield test when property is transferred. This fact sheet defines a well yield test and describes how to conduct one.

DWFSPE400DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Disinfecting Your Well
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

Shock chlorination is an easy way to disinfect your well by destryoing unhealthy bacteria and microorganisms and removing dissolved iron, manganese and hydrogen sulfide. This fact sheet describes the process for homeowners.

DWFSPE412DL/Fact Sheet: 6pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Disinfection of a Well Water Supply
State of Connecticut, Department of Public Health, Drinking Water Division

All new or repaired drinking water wells should be disinfected prior to use of the water systems. This fact sheet describes step-by-step the proper procedure for disinfection. Tables are included that calculate the volume of water per foot of pipe and the chlorine dosage required for various volumes of water. Examples of the calculations necessary for proper disinfection are provided.

DWFSPE397DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Disposal of Water Treatment Backwash at Single Family or Duplex Residences
State of New Hampshire, Department of Environmental Services

In the process of home water treatment, filters and treatment media require regular backwashing to clear out debris and to regenerate the media. This fact sheet discusses wastewater that is created through residential water treatment, why it can be a problem, and methods for its safe return to the environment.

DWFSPE200DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Distillation For Home Water Treatment
Michigan State University, Cooperative Extension Service

Purifying drinking water by using home distillation units, although not common, is one option for people with a water quality problem. This illustrated factsheet describes distillation units; the treatment process and contaminants that can be removed; and operation, cost, and maintenance factors of the units.

DWFSPE144DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (1990)

Price: $0.00


 
Distillation Treatment of Drinking Water Supplies
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Distillation is effective in eliminating heavy metals, dissolved solids, some bacteria and viruses, inorganic materials and some toxic organic chemicals. How the process works and types of units are discussed in this illustrated fact sheet.

DWFSPE288DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Do you know what's in the water? Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs)
National Environmental Services Center, Rural Community Assistance Partnership

This factsheet, developed through a partnership between the National Environmental Services Center and the Rural Community Assistance Partnership, provides an overview of pharmaceuticals and personal care products, how they impact water quality, and how to properly dispose of them.

DWFSPE424DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Doing Business in a Wellhead Protection Area
Thuston County Public Health and Social Services, Environmental Health Division

Communities across the country are realizing that preventing groundwater contamination is everyone’s best interest. This fact sheet is used to educate business owners and their employees how their work activities could affect local waters and the importance of developing a spill prevention and response plan.

DWFSPE357DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
Drinking Water and Health: What You Need to Know!
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Drinking water quality varies from place to place, depending on the condition of the source water from which it is drawn and the treatment it receives. This simple booklet tells where drinking water comes from, what contaminants may be found, how water is treated, and more. Plus, it gives a list of other EPA publications that answer further questions.

DWBLPE123DL/Booklet: 11 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00


 
Drinking Water and MTBE: A Guide for Private Well Owners
University of Wisconsin, Extension Center for Environment and Energy

This brochure informs private well owners about the gasoline additive methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE). Sections include detecting MTBE in a water supply, why it is a concern, a checklist for identifying MTBE problems, and how to protect yourself and your family. Additional sources for information are listed.

DWBLPE184DL/Booklet: 6 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00
 
Drinking Water Chlorination: A Review of Disinfection Practices and Issues
Chlorine Chemistry Council

Waterborne diseases continue to present challenges to public health officials and water suppliers. Prevention and control through source water protection and proper treatment techniques are critically important. This booklet discusses the benefits of chlorination, risks from disinfection by-products, and alternative treatment processes.

DWBLPE114DL/Booklet: 30pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Drinking Water Consumer Information
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This download contains extensive information to homeowners about their drinking water. Categories include bottled water basics, household wells, home water testing, and what to do after a flood (wells and septic systems. These articles are provided in several different languages besides English including Arabic and Vietnamese.

DWCDPE424DL/Multiple Zip Files 15.8 MB: 0 pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Drinking Water From Household Wells
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

About 15 percent of the U.S. population relies on individually owned and operated drinking water sources. This document discusses what threatens the safety of wells and groundwater, the health risks contaminated water may pose, and where people can turn for help or advice.

DWBLPE05DL/Booklet: 24 pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Drinking Water Monitoring, Compliance, and Enforcement
U.S. Environmental Protection Agnecy, Office of Water

Water systems, states, and the U.S. EPA each have a role in monitoring and assuring drinking water quality. This fact sheet explains federal requirements for testing drinking water and which water systems must be tested. Overviews of compliance issues, such as recordkeeping and reporting violations are included, plus where systems can get help in complying with regulations.

DWFSPE131DL/Fact Sheet: 20 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Drinking Water Protection Series: Nitrate Contamination--What is the Cost?
State of Minnesota, Department of Agriculture

Groundwater is a highly prized natural resource which quenches the thirst of over 70% of Minnesota’s 5 million residents. But these shallow aquifers are vulnerable to impacts from land use activities, especially nitrogen contamination. This fact sheet, describes some corrective actions used by communities to mitigate nitrate contamination and their associated costs.

DWFSPE347DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Drinking Water Quality in Indian Country: Protecting Your Sources
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This free fact sheet provides an overview of the EPA publication, Protecting Drinking Water: A Workbook for Tribes, which is available on-line. This document briefly outlines steps for assessing water resources, including mapping the source water area, identifying potential contaminant sources, and determining the susceptibility of the water supply to contaminants. The importance of informing the public is also discussed. The document includes a list of resources and contacts for those interested in conducting source water assessments.

DWFSPE329DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2008)

Price: $0.00
 
Drinking Water Quality in Indian County: Protecting Your Sources
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Many tribes have seen treatment costs rise in the last decade, and contaminant threats continue to increase as old infrastructures deteriorate. This fact sheet outlines threats to drinking water, some solutions to the problem, and resources to learn more about protecting drinking water on tribal lands.

DWFSPE118DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00


 
Drinking Water Standards
University of Arizona, College of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension

Drinking water standards set by the EPA protect public health and ensure that drinking water is of good quality. This fact sheet discusses primary and secondary drinking water standards, maximum contaminant levels and goals, and how they are determined.

DWFSPE241DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Drinking Water Standards
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Standards for drinking water quality protect consumers from microbial contaminants, radioactive elements, and toxic chemicals. This fact sheet discusses these standards and how they are set by the U.S. EPA for public drinking water.

DWFSPE293DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Drinking Water Testing
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

Well water should be routinely tested for quality. This fact sheet provides well-owners with facts about how often to test, how to choose a testing lab, what tests are recommended for specific conditions and contaminants, how to take a water sample and how to understand the test results.

DWFSPE418DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Drinking Water Treatment
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

While public water systems may vary in size and design, they all share the same goal: providing safe, reliable drinking water to the communities they serve. This fact sheet describes the different processes that may be used in water treatment to the general public. Illustrations further clarify treatment, from the source to the finished product.

DWFSPE219DL/Booklet: 3 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00


 
Drinking Water Treatments
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

Private well owners are responsible for selecting a treatment option for correcting a water contamination event. This fact sheet offers information about choosing the best treatment option for any given situation. Tables provide information about specific contaminants and the treatment recommended for its removal and the estimated costs associated with these options.

DWFSPE419DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00
 
Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

When you turn on the faucet to get a drink or to take a shower, do you know where your water comes from? Over 100,000 Rhode Islanders drinking groundwater supplied by a private well on their property and as an individual well owner, you are responsible for the quality of your own water. This fact sheet, part of Private Wells Series provides homeowners with information about the construction of wells and six important ways to protect your drinking water well.

DWFSPE247DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Drinking Water: Past, Present, and Future
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

During the 1800s, scientists began to gain an understanding of the sources and effects of drinking water contaminants, especially those that weren't visible to the naked eye. We've come a long way since then, solving many of the problems associated with waterborne pathogens through drinking water treatment technologies. This fact sheet outlines highlights of the Safe Drinking Water Act and discusses regulations, compliance issues, and future challenges.

DWFSPE122DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Eight Tools of Watershed Protection in Developing Areas
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Center for Watershed Protection

Adapted from an on-line training module of the EPA's Watershed Academy Web, this booklet helps watershed managers with their critical decision-making. The strategies described in this publication can help managers determine such things as which mix of stewardship programs is best for their community, who are the best targets for watershed education and how to pay for a stewardship program. A glossary and self-test are included.

DWBLPE394DL/Booklet: 30 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
El Agua Potable y la Salud: lo que usted debe saber
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Drinking Water quality varies from place to place, depending on the condition of the source water from which it is drawn and the treatment it recieves. This simple booklet tells where drinking water comes from, what contaminents may be found, how water is treated, and more. Plus, it gives a list of other EPA publications that answer further questions.

DWBLPE209DL/Booklet: 11 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Emergency Disinfection of Drinking Water
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

When the home water supply is interrupted by natural or other forms of disaster, you can disinfect water to make it safe for drinking. This fact sheet outlines steps to take to make water potable.

DWFSPE243DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00


 
Emergency Disinfection of Drinking Water (Spanish Version)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

(Spanish Version) When the home water supply is interrupted by natural or other forms of disaster, you can disinfect water to make it safe for drinking. This fact sheet outlines steps to take to make water potable.

DWFSPE245DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2006)

Price: $0.00
 
Emergency Disinfection of Water Supplies
Ohio State University, Agricultural Engineering Department

Floods, storms, and extended power failures can make private water supplies unsafe to drink. This fact sheet provides tips on disinfecting contaminated water in emergencies.

DWFSPE57DL/Fact Sheet: 1pp. (1991)

Price: $0.00


 
Emerging Water Contaminants
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

New studies are revealing the presence of drugs, personal care products and other substances we use everyday are now present in our drinking water. These substances are commonly referred to as emerging contaminants. This fact sheet explains to well-owners some of the possible health effects of these chemicals and the appropriate water treatment methods for removing them.

DWFSPE421DL/Fact Sheet: 2pp. (2005)

Price: $0.00
 
Environmental Education: Non-Point Source Pollution
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This classroom activity for children in grades 4-7 demonstrates what an average storm drain collects when it rain and how the water from storm drains can impact water quality and the aquatic environment of local streams, rivers, and bays.

DWFSPE270DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Environmental Education: Role of Plants in Water Filtration
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This experiment shows how a plume of dissolved materials can move through soil and enter a groundwater aquifer. Depending on whether materials are dissolved or suspended in the water, soils and plant roots can remove some or all of this material as the water moves down through the soil.

DWFSPE226DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00
 
Environmental Education: Water Purification by Evaporation and Condensation
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This activity demonstrates how the water cycle helps to purify water by using simple materials that can be assembled in the classroom.

DWFSPE225DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
EPA Safewater: Tap Into It!
U.S. Envrionmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water & Drinking Water

An important part of the 1996 Reauthorization of the Safe Drinking Water Act was to increase emphasis on public information, citizen involvement, and community partnerships. The EPA created this info packet to help people learn about national drinking water programs, the Safe Drinking Water Act, and more. Plus, it offers facts about U.S. water systems.

DWPKPE116DL/Package: 15 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
EPA's Healthy Watersheds Initiative
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

This factsheet encourages state and local governments, local organizations, and others to engage in watershed protection as a way to protect high-quality waters and prevent future impairments.

DWFSPE425DL/Fact Sheet: 4 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00


 
Estableciendo estandarews para agua potable segura
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

EPA sets standards that, when combined with protecting groundwater and surface water, are critical to ensuring safe drinking water. This booklet describes what the standards are, how they protect public health, and how the standards are established.

DWBLPE194DL/Fact Sheet: 7 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00
 
Estandares del Reglamento Nacional Primario de Agua Potable (National Primary Drinking Water Standards) (Spanish)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

This factsheet describes the National Primary Drinking Water Standards along with the maximum contamination level goal (MCLG) and the maximum contamination level (MCL). Possible health effects due to exposure higher than the MCL for each contaminant and the common contamination sources for each is included.

DWBLPE197DL/Fact Sheet: 5 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Estimating Water Use and Savings in Your Home
Penn State University, College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

This fact sheet helps determine how much water we use in our homes. Simple calculations show how more efficient appliances and water-conserving devices will save water as well as money.

DWBLPE300DL/Booklet: 6pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00
 
Extension Extra: Drinking Water Standards—Health Advisory Levels
South Dakota State University, Cooperative Extension Service

Drinking water with contaminant levels above acceptable health standards may cause adverse health effects over time. For this reason, EPA has established health advisory levels to help state and local officials in determining levels of chemical concentrations that are acceptable in drinking water. This guide provides a list of contaminants, as well as related health effects and advisory levels established by EPA as of August 1994.

DWFSPE203DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2002)

Price: $0.00


 
Extension Extra: Water for Emergency Use
South Dakota State University, Cooperative Extension Service

When a storm or other natural disaster strikes, access to water, food, and electricity may end for days or even weeks. Having enough clean drinking water in storage can make life a lot easier in an emergency. This publication explains how to safely store water and how to make impure water safe to drink in an emergency situation.

DWFSPE204DL/Fact Sheet: 3pp. (2010)

Price: $0.00
 
Fact Sheet On Home Drinking Water Treatment
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region IX

This fact sheet explains the most common types of home water treatment units and their capabilities. Technologies, such as filters, softeners, activated carbon filtration, reverse osmosis, and UV disinfection, are discussed.

DWBLPE96DL/Fact Sheet: 8 pp. (1988)

Price: $0.00


 
Facts About... Well Protection in Flood Prone Areas
Maryland Department of the Environment, Water Management Administration

This fact sheet is intended to supplement flood precautions issued by the local health departments. Recommended actions for homeowners in case their well is flooded is presented. Contact information for agencies that can help with sampling and testing the well water is included.

DWFSPE316DL/Fact Sheet: 3 pp. (2004)

Price: $0.00
 
Fluoride in Private Drinking Water Wells
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Fluoride, in the right amount, promotes the development of strong teeth and is beneficial for children under age 12. But, too much fluoride can be detrimental. This fact sheet explains on how to interpret water test results for fluoride levels in private water supplies and also suggests some corrective actions.

DWFSPE303DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Frequently Asked CCR Questions
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Have questions about your system's consumer confidence report? Don't worry; you're not alone. This report answers several of those that are commonly asked.

DWBLPE199DL/Booklet: 6 pp. (1999)

Price: $0.00
 
Frequently Asked Questions About Bottled Water
University of Rhode Island, Cooperative Extension

Each year consumers spend about $4 billion on bottled water. Their reasons run the gamut from convenience to avoiding a contamination problem. This fact sheet answers questions about regulations for suppliers, types, safety, and lists sources for more information.

DWFSPE249DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2003)

Price: $0.00


 
Frequently Asked Technical Questions
Water Systems Council, wellcare® Program

This fact sheet answers some of the most common questions from well-owners about typical well problems. This knowledge can help you when discussing the problem with a well contractor or pump installer when you when you contact them for help or repair.

DWFSPE413DL/Fact Sheet: 4pp. (2007)

Price: $0.00
 
Getting up to Speed: The Water Cycle and Water Conservation
U.S. Environmental Protection agency, Office of Ground Water & Drinking Water

This teachers guide contains a series of lessons and activities for secondary students. Topics include groundwater resources and protection, water distribution systems, groundwater contamination, and wellhead protection programs.

DWBKPE216DL/Book: 70 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Giardia Infection: Giardiasis
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; National Center for Infectious Diseases , Division of Parasitic Diseases

Contaminated water can lead to several illnesses.This fact sheet discusses giardiasis, an illness caused by the microscopic Giardia parasite that lives in the intestine of humans and animals.

DWFSPE172DL/Fact Sheet: 5 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00
 
Giardia: Drinking Water Fact Sheet
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Giardia, an infectious, intestinal parasite, is distributed worldwide in lakes, ponds, rivers, and streams. Municipal wastewater probably always contain Giardia cysts. This fact sheet discusses Giardia in the environment, its human health effects and treatment, who is at risk, prevention through water treatment, and who to contact if contamination is suspected.

DWFSPE213DL/Fact Sheet: 5 pp. (2000)

Price: $0.00


 
Giardiasis (Spanish)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Infectious Diseases Division of Parsitic Diseases

Contaminated water can lead to several illnesses.This Spanish-language fact sheet discusses giardiasis, an illness caused by the microscopic Giardia parasite that lives in the intestine of humans and animals.

DWFSPE171DL/Booklet: 5 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00
 
Give Water A Hand Action Guide
U.S. Department of Agriculture Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service

Helping young people learn about water supplies and conservation is one of the best ways to ensure healthy communities. This two-book set offers students fun activities and tips that get them started thinking about protecting water resources.

DWPKPE49DL/Book: 72 pp. (N/A)

Price: $0.00


 
Good Water Habits: What You Need to Know
National Groundwater Association

Whether you use well water or a public drinking water supply, you can take measures to make sure yur water is safe. This fact sheet answers several questions about about water contaminants and suggests things to do at home to keep your water safe.

DWFSPE261DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (2009)

Price: $0.00
 
Ground Water and Surface Water: A Single Resource
Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey

Nearly all surface water features interact with groundwater. This illustrated book gives an overview of the relationship between groundwater and surface water. It is intended to help build a foundation for policies governing the management and protection of aquifers and watersheds.

DWBKPE115DL/Book: 87 pp. (1998)

Price: $0.00


 
Ground Water Protection: A Citizen's Action Checklist
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water

Americans have some of the safest drinking water supplies in the world, but it takes a tremendous amount of work to ensure that this remains true. This fact sheet lists a number of actions individuals may take to help keep drinking water supplies safe.

DWFSPE36DL/Fact Sheet: 2 pp. (1992)

Price: $0.00
 
Ground Water Protection: What You Need to Know
National Groundwater Association

This fact sheet answers several of the most frequently asked questions about groundwater and offers tips on protecting this source of drinking water for 47 percent of the U.S. population.

DWFSPE266DL/Fact Sheet: 1 pp. (2001)

Price: $0.00

« Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | »


   
NESC Logo

The National Environmental Services Center (NESC)
(phone) 800-624-8301 (e-mail) info@mail.nesc.wvu.edu
(web) www.nesc.wvu.edu

© Copyright 2010, NESC All Rights Reserved.

Survey Software powered by SurveyMethods.com used for NESC Customer Questionnaire.